Lessons http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/8/Not-Specified en Robert Johnson Lesson: How to Unlock the Guitar Mysteries of the Delta Blues Great http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-unlocking-guitar-mysteries-delta-blues-great-robert-johnson <!--paging_filter--><p>Delta blues giant Robert Johnson (May 8, 1911–August 16, 1938) is one of the most fascinating and mysterious performers in music history. </p> <p>He created an essential body of blues guitar music, recording 29 songs in 1936 and 1937 that would exert a powerful influence on the likes of Eric Clapton, Jimi Hendrix, Keith Richards, Johnny Winter and many others. </p> <p>In this edition of In Deep, we’ll examine the variety of picking techniques and tunings that Johnson used to craft his timeless, deeply emotional music.</p> <p>One of the staples of Johnson’s style is his ability to sound at times like two guitar players, combining driving rhythms on the lower strings with melodic figures on the higher strings. Due to the fact that his recordings were intentionally sped up when first released, definitive analyses of his tunings and capo positions is near impossible. That said, the interpretations offered here are practical and easily achieved. </p> <p>Johnson’s tunings can be broken down into four categories: standard tuning, open G, open D and drop D. Some of the songs interpreted as open G or open D may have in fact been performed in open A or open E, respectively. </p> <p>Let’s start with standard tuning, which is the tuning Johnson used for the recordings “Kind Hearted Woman Blues,” “I’m a Steady Rollin’ Man,” “Love in Vain” and “Sweet Home Chicago.” The last song was performed in standard tuning with a capo at the second fret. A complete transcription of “Sweet Home Chicago” begins on page 126 (note that all tab numbers represent the distance from the capo; i.e., “12” represents 12 frets above the capo, though the note is actually played at the 14th fret). </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience906500703001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="906500703001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> The intro is a “turnaround,” normally found in the last two bars of a 12-bar blues progression. Johnson started many of his songs in this way: through bars 1 and 2, the high E tonic note is used as a pedal tone while other notes descend the D string. At the end of bar 2 into bar 3, he transitions to B7, the five chord. </p> <p>The verse is initiated at bar 3, and at this point Johnson creates the sound of two “voices” by playing a solid rhythm on the bottom two strings, alternating between root-fifth, root-sixth and root-flatted seventh chords while adding melodic notes on the G and high E strings. In bars 13 and 14, he performs a different turnaround, alternating between descending two-note figures on the G and B strings and the open high E. </p> <p>Johnson achieved great definition between the low and high string parts by fingerpicking and using a thumb pick. I perform these licks using hybrid picking, holding a pick between the thumb and index fingers and using the other pick-hand fingers, primarily the middle and ring, to fingerpick.</p> <p>Played in the same tuning and capo position, “When You’ve Got a Good Friend” features a similar intro, albeit one slightly more complex in the fingerpicking pattern. Here, Johnson incorporates irregular bar lengths, a common practice among country blues guitarists. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 1</strong> includes a bar of 3/8 at the end of the intro, which functions as a pick-up for singing. In evidence again is the inclusion of simple melodic additions on the G and high E strings played against the driving rhythm of the low strings. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience906477013001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="906477013001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep0411_1.jpg" /></p> <p>“Love in Vain” was performed in standard tuning in the key of G, with the capo at the first fret, as approximated in <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>. This excerpt starts with a turnaround consisting of chromatically descending double-stops (two-note figures), thirds apart and played on the top two strings. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience906477002001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="906477002001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep0411_2.jpg" /></p> <p>In the verse section, the strong rhythm is maintained on the bottom strings while harmonic interest is added through subtle changes in chord voicings on the top two strings. </p> <p>While these high notes are allowed to ring, the lower notes should be slightly palm muted and played with staccato accents. Bar 9 offers a twist, with a shift to the II7 (two-dominant seventh) chord, A7, before resolving to the five chord, D7/F#, for which the low F# bass note is thumb-fretted.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep0411_3.jpg" /></p> <p>Johnson employed open G tuning (low to high, D G D G B D: see <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>) for tunes such as “Crossroad Blues,” “Walkin’ Blues” and “Come on in My Kitchen.” He utilized specific chord voicings designed to work with open tunings, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>, akin to “Stones in My Passway.” The example begins with slide guitar (Johnson wore a metal slide on his pinkie), before switching to chord voicings made up of all open strings combined with notes fretted on the top two strings. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep0411_5.jpg" /></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience906500682001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="906500682001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> The verse section (bar 5) features classic Johnson chord voicings for G6 and G7 on the downbeats of beats two, three and four. In bar 5, the four chord, C7, is sounded by barring across the top three strings at the fifth fret, adding and removing a high Bf note at the eighth fret of the first string. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep0411_7.jpg" /></p> <p>The final example is played in open D tuning (low to high: D A D Fs A D), illustrated in <strong>FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7</strong> offers an example in the style of “Ramblin’ on My Mind” and features slide guitar extensively. The example begins with slide figures, positioned on the top four strings at the 12th fret and played against the open low-string “rhythm” part. When playing these slide licks and vibratos, position the slide directly over the fretwire for proper intonation.</p> <p>The verse (bar 6) consists of four bars of the one chord, followed by two bars on the four chord, G7, fretted at the fifth fret. Likewise, the five chord, A7 (bar 14) is positioned at the seventh fret. </p> <p>Each Robert Johnson composition offers an invaluable lesson in country blues guitar. Hopefully this column has shed light on his playing style and will inspire you to investigate his music further. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience906500673001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="906500673001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience906492203001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="906492203001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/robert-johnson">Robert Johnson</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-unlocking-guitar-mysteries-delta-blues-great-robert-johnson#comments April 2011 In Deep Robert Johnson Videos Blogs Lessons Magazine Tue, 04 Aug 2015 18:10:18 +0000 Andy Aledort 17333 at http://www.guitarworld.com How to Incorporate Suspended Chords into Heavy Metal Rhythm Guitar Parts http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-incorporating-suspended-chords-metal-rhythm-parts <!--paging_filter--><p> One of the coolest things about contemporary metal is that its harmonic palette is wide open. </p> <p>It’s not uncommon for a great metal riff to jump back and forth from one type of harmonic environment to another, such as from the natural minor scale to the Phrygian mode to the Mixolydian mode to the blues scale. </p> <p>Countless examples abound in the music of such great bands as Metallica, Megadeth, Pantera, At the Gates, In Flames and others. </p> <p>This month, I’d like to demonstrate a few different examples of rhythm-guitar ideas that jump around harmonically and also feature the incorporation of suspended chords, namely sus2 and sus4 chords.</p> <p>With sus2 and sus4 chords, the third is replaced by the second or fourth, respectively, each substitution giving the chord a mysterious quality that is neither major nor minor. <strong>FIGURES 1</strong> and <strong>2</strong> are built from shifting two-note chord forms played against pedal tones. In <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, I begin with a two-note root-fifth A5 power chord on the D and G strings and proceed to play descending two-note shapes against an open A-string pedal tone. </p> <p>After striking the A5 power chord in bar 1, the next two-note chord is A(b5). Keeping the A root note in place, the E note on the G string shifts down one fret, to Eb, the flatted fifth. In bar 2, I move these shapes down a whole step, two frets, so now the first two-note chord is A7sus4 (or G5/A), followed by A7. </p> <p>In bars 3 and 4, I move the fretted shapes over to the A and D strings, and bar 4 includes three different two-note chord types: A5, Asus2 and Am7. Bars 1 and 2 then repeat, after which I wrap up the figure with B5 and C5 power chords. The last phrase (bar 8) is based on quick hammer-ons and pull-offs on the bottom two strings that move from the index finger and pinkie to the open string.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 2</strong> has us alternating between root-fifth chords and root-sixth and root-sharp-five chords. Once again, the lower note in each chord is used as a repeating pedal tone. In bar 4 of this example, I additionally include an index-finger barre across the A and D strings to sound F5/C, which can also be analyzed as Csus4. This rhythm part ends with a “Crazy Train”-type single-note line built from a steady ascension from the starting note in each subsequent bar.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 3</strong> is a single-note idea based on the D Mixolydian mode (D E F# G A B C), with reference made to Dsus4, via the consistent use of the G note, which is the fourth of D. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Urw2_de1dUA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-08-03%20at%2012.19.10%20PM.png" width="620" height="479" alt="Screen shot 2015-08-03 at 12.19.10 PM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-08-03%20at%2012.20.01%20PM.png" width="620" height="370" alt="Screen shot 2015-08-03 at 12.20.01 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-incorporating-suspended-chords-metal-rhythm-parts#comments Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak November 2014 Videos Lessons Magazine Tue, 04 Aug 2015 17:03:27 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak 22317 at http://www.guitarworld.com How Guitarists Can Build Super-Human Legato Chops http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-how-build-super-human-legato-chops <!--paging_filter--><p>An essential element in soloing for all guitarists is the use of legato techniques. </p> <p>The term legato is defined as “smooth and connected,” and a legato sound is generally achieved on the guitar through the incorporation of hammer-ons, pull-offs and finger slides. </p> <p>In most of my previous columns, we have focused on pick-hand techniques involving downstrokes, upstrokes, alternate picking and economy picking. This month, I’ve designed a series of exercises to get your fret-hand chops in shape and develop excellent fretboard “traction.” </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/metalforlife1010_1.jpg" /></p> <p>In <Strong>FIGURE 1,</strong> I play repeated descending figures based on the E Phrygian mode (E F G A B C D), sticking with a steady rhythm of eighth-note triplets. Each eighth-note triplet incorporates a double pull-off. On beat one, I start with my fret-hand pinkie on the high E string’s 12th fret and pick that note with a downstroke. I then pull off to the 10th fret, fretted with the middle finger, followed by an additional pull-off to the eighth fret, fretted with the index finger. </p> <p>As you can see, a wide stretch is required to execute these double pull-offs, so position your fret-hand thumb squarely on the back of the neck to allow as great a reach as possible with the fretting fingers. Work through each group of notes carefully, and then focus on making clean position shifts down the fretboard as the riff progresses.</p> <p>When pulling off, it is essential that the note you’re pulling off to is fretted in advance, or “pre-fretted,” so as to be ready to “catch” the pull-off. Also, as you pull off, you’ll need to literally pull the string slightly sideways, in toward the palm, as you release it. This will ensure a sufficient amount of volume and projection.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/v2Cg7Sw1LIg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/metalforlife1010_2.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>FIGURE 2</strong> raises the bar, so to speak, in a variety of ways. First, the example is not based on any specific scale; rather, it’s built from symmetrical fretboard patterns that move across all of the strings. I begin on beat one with a pull-off/hammer-on eighth-note triplet shape followed by a straight double pull-off. I then alternate between these two melodic “cells” as the riff progresses, with some quick descending slides thrown in at the end of each bar to accommodate the many position shifts. </p> <p>Again, work through the figure slowly and strive for an even and clean execution of the pull-offs, as well as the shifts. </p> <p>Our final example, shown in <strong>FIGURE 3,</strong> is purely symmetrical throughout: ascending across three adjacent strings repeatedly, I use a wide fret-hand stretch to sound four notes per string, starting on the sixth string and followed by the fifth and fourth. I then move back to the fifth string and repeat the pattern, starting from the fifth string and moving up to the fourth and third. </p> <p>This pattern is repeated across the remaining trios of adjacent strings. Remember that we’re picking only the first note on each string (to initiate the vibration) then using hammers and pulls to sound the subsequent notes. Make sure your hammer-ons are firm and strong, and practice the phrases slowly until you can execute them at shred speeds.</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-how-build-super-human-legato-chops#comments Metal For Life Metal Mike Metal Mike Chlasciak October 2012 2012 Videos Blogs Lessons Magazine Tue, 04 Aug 2015 16:47:19 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak 16553 at http://www.guitarworld.com Get a Free '20 Essential Acoustic Rock Licks' Lesson at the 'Guitar World Lessons' Store — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/get-free-20-essential-acoustic-rock-licks-andy-aledort-lesson-guitar-world-lessons-store-video/25149 <!--paging_filter--><p>Want to master the ins and outs of acoustic rock guitar and learn the techniques of players like Pete Townshend, Jimmy Page, Neil Young and Bob Dylan?</p> <p><em><a href="https://guitarworldlessons.com/product/5AC6E1C6-40FA-E9A3-26DB-9525AB3F440C?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=20acoustic">20 Essential Acoustic Rock Licks</a></em> will teach you how to play versatile rhythm patterns, arpeggiated open chords, open suspended chords and hammers and pulls. </p> <p>Plus, you’ll learn the basics of playing in the styles of rockabilly, early rock and roll, the Beatles, Delta blues and more!</p> <p><em><a href="https://guitarworldlessons.com/product/5AC6E1C6-40FA-E9A3-26DB-9525AB3F440C?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=20acoustic">20 Essential Acoustic Rock Licks</a></em> is now available through the through the Guitar World Lessons <a href="https://guitarworldlessons.com/product/5AC6E1C6-40FA-E9A3-26DB-9525AB3F440C?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=20acoustic">Webstore</a>. It joins the ranks of the many lessons already available through <a href="https://guitarworldlessons.com/product/5AC6E1C6-40FA-E9A3-26DB-9525AB3F440C?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=20acoustic">Guitar World Lessons</a>. </p> <p>To celebrate this new release, <em>Guitar World</em> is offering the first <em>20 Essential Acoustic Rock Licks</em> lesson, "Lick 1 – Basic Rhythm Pattern in C," as a FREE download! Note that all 20 <em>20 Essential Acoustic Rock Licks</em> lessons are available—as a package—for only $14.99.</p> <p><strong>For more information, visit the Guitar World Lessons <a href="https://guitarworldlessons.com/product/5AC6E1C6-40FA-E9A3-26DB-9525AB3F440C?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=20acoustic">Webstore</a> and download the <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/guitar-world-lessons/id942720009?mt=8">App</a> now.</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/QsM38GthQIM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/get-free-20-essential-acoustic-rock-licks-andy-aledort-lesson-guitar-world-lessons-store-video/25149#comments 20 Essential Acoustic Rock Licks Andy Aledort Guitar World Lessons Videos News Lessons Fri, 31 Jul 2015 17:20:55 +0000 Guitar World Staff 25149 at http://www.guitarworld.com Exotic Scales Lesson: Around the World in Seven Scales — with Tab http://www.guitarworld.com/exotic-scales-lesson-around-world-seven-scales-tab/25145 <!--paging_filter--><p>Musicians on this side of the pond often get caught in a rut, concocting tunes and solos in a typical Westernized manner. </p> <p>But there’s a great big world out there, full of music from other countries and cultures that can be easily added to your repertoire.</p> <p>Ethnic, or exotic, scales can add an intriguing twist to your playing, giving you the sounds of the Far East, Middle East, Eastern Bloc and Latin America, You can hear many of these tonalities in the ax work of players like John McLaughlin, Al Di Meola, Marty Friedman and Yngwie Malmsteen This lesson will serve as a guided musical tour of select world sounds.<br /> <br /><br /> <strong>HARMONIC MINOR</strong><br /> (1-2b3-4-5-b6-7)</p> <p>Pioneered in the Seventies by Michael Schenker, Ritchie Blackmore and Ulrich Roth, neoclassical metal rose to the rock forefront in the mid Eighties when chopsmeister Yngwie Malmsteen stepped onto the scene. The Bach rocker’s scale of choice was harmonic minor, played in <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> in the key of G# minor (G#-A#-B-C#-D#-E-G). Anchor your hand in 7th position for the duration of the figure, and use alternate picking (down, up, down, etc.) throughout.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-07-31%20at%2010.39.43%20AM.png" width="620" height="194" alt="Screen Shot 2015-07-31 at 10.39.43 AM.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>JAPANESE</strong><br /> 1-b2-4-5-b6</p> <p>Lacking a 3rd or 7th, and therefore tonally ambiguous, the versatile Japanese scale works well in a variety of situations, including major- and minor-key progressions, as well as Phrygian-based contexts. <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> is based on the E Japanese scale (E-F-A-B-C). Take a rubato approach here—that is, let the tempo fluctuate, altering your phrasing in a way that feels right to you.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-07-31%20at%2010.41.48%20AM.png" width="620" height="215" alt="Screen Shot 2015-07-31 at 10.41.48 AM.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>CHINESE</strong><br /> 1-2-3-5-6</p> <p>Many of you are already familiar with the Chinese scale. You just know it by its Western name: major Pentatonic. In the Western world, this sound is heard perhaps most famously in the work of the Allman Brothers. <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, on the other hand, has a distinctly non-Western sound, courtesy of the timbre (sound quality) of its notes and how they’re phrased. </p> <p>Derived from the B Chinese scale (B-C#-D#-F#-G#), this ethereal line uses harp harmonics to evoke the sound of the zither, a traditional stringed instrument. To execute each harmonic, lightly rest your pick hand’s 1st finger on the octave of the pre-fretted note (i.e. 12 frets higher), and pluck the string with your pick-hand’s thumb.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-07-31%20at%2010.43.22%20AM.png" width="620" height="217" alt="Screen Shot 2015-07-31 at 10.43.22 AM.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>PHRYGIAN DOMINANT</strong><br /> 1-b2-3-4-5-b6-b7</p> <p>The fifth mode of the harmonic minor scale, Phrygian dominant provides the exotic ambience heard in Al Di Meola’s “Egyptian Danza” and Iron Maiden’s “Powerslave.” The G-rooted (G-Ab-B-C-D-Eb-F) lick in <strong>FIGURE 4</strong> combines slurred note groupings with static open-string drones to create a distinctly Egyptian sound. Make sure you pay close attention to the fret-hand shifts here. Measure 1 is played in 3rd position, while measure 2 dips into 1st position.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-07-31%20at%2010.45.36%20AM.png" width="620" height="242" alt="Screen Shot 2015-07-31 at 10.45.36 AM.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>GYPSY</strong><br /> 1-b2-3-4-5-b6-7</p> <p>The Gypsy scale differs from the Phrygian dominant by using a major rather than a minor 7th for additional color. Both the Phrygian dominant and the Gypsy scale provide excellent soloing options over chord progressions containing major chords a half step apart. For example, try playing the E Gypsy scale over an E-F vamp. The E-rooted (E-F-G#-A-B-C-D#) riff in <strong>FIGURE 5</strong> calls to mind Rainbow’s “Gates of Babylon,” on which Ritchie Blackmore takes the listener on a magic carpet ride by way of the Gypsy scale. Be sure to palm-mute the 6th string throughout, so that the above melodic line really comes across.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-07-31%20at%2010.47.51%20AM.png" width="620" height="255" alt="Screen Shot 2015-07-31 at 10.47.51 AM.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>HUNGARIAN MINOR</strong><br /> 1-2-b3-#4-5-b6-7</p> <p>If you’ve been searching for a cool scale to play over a minor(maj7) chord, then the Hungarian minor scale is just what you need. The majority of the A Hungarian minor (A-B-C-D#-E-F-G#) passage in <strong>FIGURE 6</strong> is rooted in 7th position, with the exception of the closing chromatic phrase, which sits in 11th position. In learning this figure, you might want to first isolate the 16th-note slur on beat 3 of bar 4. To get this legato turn to sound as smoothly as possible, use your 2nd, 3rd and 1st fingers, respectively, on frets 12, 13 and 11.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-07-31%20at%2010.48.02%20AM.png" width="620" height="238" alt="Screen Shot 2015-07-31 at 10.48.02 AM.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>PERSIAN</strong><br /> 1-b2-3-4-b5-b6-7</p> <p>We’ll close things out with the E Persian scale (E-F-G#-A-Bb-C-D3), which gets its dark Middle Eastern vibe from its b5, or tritone, interval. Because it contains both a major 3rd and a major 7th, the Persian scale serves as an interesting option for Lydian-based chords (maj7#11). But it can also be used as a basis for sinister metal riffs like the one in <strong>FIGURE 7</strong>, For the last two beats of bar 2, use your fret hand’s 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th fingers in consecutive order.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-07-31%20at%2010.48.10%20AM.png" width="620" height="211" alt="Screen Shot 2015-07-31 at 10.48.10 AM.png" /> </p> http://www.guitarworld.com/exotic-scales-lesson-around-world-seven-scales-tab/25145#comments Guitar One Lessons Fri, 31 Jul 2015 14:54:41 +0000 Guitar World Staff 25145 at http://www.guitarworld.com Wild Stringdom with John Petrucci: Recognizing Repetitive Fretboard Shapes on All String Groups http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-recognizing-repetitive-fretboard-shapes-all-string-groups <!--paging_filter--><p>Hello, and welcome to my new <em>Guitar World</em> instructional column. </p> <p>In the coming months, I’ll share with you some of the guitar-playing concepts and approaches that have helped me develop my technique and overall playing style. I’d like to start off with an examination of ascending scalar shapes that, by design, cover the majority of the fretboard. </p> <p>I have found such patterns to be very useful for both melodic and shred-style playing and also very helpful in regard to the “greater mission,” which is to gain a fuller and deeper understanding of the construction of musical ideas within the framework of the guitar’s fretboard. </p> <p>The following examples are built from phrases made up of three notes per string that are played across two strings, resulting in various six-note shapes. I play these shapes in a rhythm of straight 16th notes, however, so there is an inherent “threes on twos” kind of rhythm that is alluded to throughout. </p> <p>All of the phrases in this lesson are based on the E natural minor scale (E F# G A B C D), also known as the E Aeolian mode. </p> <p>In <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, using alternate (down-up-downup) picking throughout, I ascend the D and G strings, beginning on the note E on the D string’s second fret, fretted with the index finger. I follow with two more notes on the D string, fretted with the ring finger and pinkie, and then I move over to the G string and play three ascending notes fretted in exactly the same manner—index to ring to pinkie.</p> <p>On the upbeat of beat two, I shift up to the next fretboard position of E natural minor and use my index finger, middle finger and pinkie to sound three notes per string on the D and G strings. A third six-note shape then appears when we move up one more time, with the index finger, middle finger and pinkie employed for the wider stretch needed for the subsequent pair of three-note shapes.</p> <p>Notice that, as you ascend through this riff, there are slight variances in the shapes used on each specific string in order to accommodate the notes of E natural minor. If we move the idea down to the bottom two strings, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, we find that the same fretting shapes are used, albeit in a different sequence. </p> <p>And the same is true when we move the idea up to the top two strings, as illustrated in <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>. Only three different physical shapes are used to form the three-note patterns, and this is good, because it enables one to develop muscle memory in the fret-hand, which is immeasurably beneficial.</p> <p>The only exception to this consistency of shapes occurs when playing similar patterns on the G and B strings. That’s because these two strings are tuned a major third apart, whereas the adjacent strings in the other pairs are tuned a perfect fourth apart. </p> <p>As shown in <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>, one must move up an additional half step—one fret—when crossing from the G string to the B. <strong>FIGURE 5</strong> offers a clearer representation of this B-string shift within a longer example that moves across all of the strings. Once you have these shapes under your fingers, experiment with moving them to every area of the fretboard, and then transpose the patterns to all 12 keys.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-03-13%20at%2011.10.34%20AM.png" width="620" height="530" alt="Screen Shot 2014-03-13 at 11.10.34 AM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-03-13%20at%2011.10.45%20AM.png" width="620" height="305" alt="Screen Shot 2014-03-13 at 11.10.45 AM.png" /></p> <p><strong>PART ONE</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/e3qIi5FA7AQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>PART TWO</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2717386885001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2717386885001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-recognizing-repetitive-fretboard-shapes-all-string-groups#comments December 2013 Dream Theater John Petrucci Wild Stringdom Blogs News Lessons Magazine Wed, 29 Jul 2015 14:58:05 +0000 John Petrucci 19402 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep Lesson with Andy Aledort: How to Play "Little Wing" by Jimi Hendrix http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-jimi-hendrixs-little-wing <!--paging_filter--><p>Jimi Hendrix's stature as rock's greatest guitarist is by now an absolute and indisputable fact. In this month's edition of "In Deep," I'll examine his genius within the realm of rhythm guitar.</p> <p>Let’s begin with a breakdown of the intro to the live version of “Little Wing,” transcribed in this issue [see page 136 of the December 2011 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>]. Before we begin, keep in mind that, as was his nature, Jimi never played any song exactly the same way twice. </p> <p>Live or in the studio, he always strove for spontaneously inspired performances of every song. For guitarists, this offers a vast treasure of musical lessons to be learned when studying any one of Hendrix’s compositions.</p> <p>This version of “Little Wing,” recorded at what is acknowledged as the Jimi Hendrix Experience’s greatest live performance—on February 24, 1969, at London’s Albert Hall—differs in many subtle but fascinating ways from the studio track heard on <em>Axis: Bold as Love</em>. </p> <p>In the pickup and through bar 1, Jimi first strikes muted strings by lightly laying his fret hand across the fretboard. This is followed by an expressive slide down from the 12th fret; Jimi barres across the top two strings while lightly fretting the sixth string at the 12th fret by wrapping his thumb over the top of the fretboard.</p> <p>Across beats three and four, he works off a 12th-position Em7 chord shape, striking different pairs of strings in conjunction with single notes to create a “chord/melody” effect.</p> <p>In bar 2, Jimi plays a third-position G major chord by fretting the sixth-string bass note with his thumb and choosing not to barre the index finger across all six strings or fret the A string with the ring finger, which frees up his pinkie to embellish the chord with fast hammer-ons and pull-offs on the G and high E strings. The same approach is used for bar 3 over Am.</p> <p>Notice how he moves smoothly from sounding pairs of strings to single notes while weaving an evolving and forward-moving rhythm part. Back over Em7 on bar 4, Jimi uses the seventh-position shape to execute a series of delicate hammer-ons and pull-offs, setting up the chord change to Bm in the next bar, which is also played in seventh position.</p> <p>Using Bf to shift down to Am in fifth position, on beat two he begins with a ring-finger barre across the D, G and B strings at the seventh fret to hammer up to the ninth fret on the D string with the pinkie. This is followed by a full arpeggiation of C on beat three into incorporation of C/E on beat four, sliding up to E on the A string’s seventh fret.</p> <p>Bar 7 features Hendrix’s signature “sliding sus2” voicings, as Gsus2 slides up to Asus2 and then down to Fsus2. Though the thumb is used to fret the low bass notes throughout, keep this finger loose as to limit the amount of pressure that the palm of the hand exerts against the back of the neck. In bars 8 and 9, Jimi utilizes fifth-string-root voicings of C and D major, wrapping up the intro with chord-melody figures based on D/Fs.</p> <p>Let’s now expand on the rhythm techniques Jimi uses on this version of “Little Wing.” In <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, I begin with the same G major voicing found in bar 2, but I incorporate more elaborate hammer-ons and pull-offs on the top three strings as well as utilize quick finger slides and hammer-ons based on the G major pentatonic scale (G A B D E).</p> <p>Another great example of Jimi’s inventiveness with this chord form is heard on his Monterey Pop version of Bob Dylan’s “Like a Rolling Stone.” In <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, I fret only the sixth, fourth and second strings while sliding between G and Fsus2 chord voicings, incorporating the open G string throughout to provide a powerful sustaining quality.</p> <p>Similar in execution is Jimi’s rhythm part to the intro and verse sections of “Love or Confusion” from Are You Experienced. In <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, I emulate this part by adding quick hammerons and pull-offs on the B and G strings within both the G5 and Fsus2 voicings. The “sliding sus2” chords of “Little Wing,” alluded to in <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>, also appear in another great Hendrix ballad, “Castles Made of Sand.” <strong>FIGURE 5</strong> offers an extended version of sliding these chord forms up and down the fretboard.</p> <p>Now let’s apply these techniques to a few chord progressions. In <strong>FIGURE 6</strong>, I move from sixth-string-root G, Am, Bm and C voicings back to G while adding quick hammers and pulls within each voicing. In <strong>FIGURE 7</strong>, a similar approach is taken for C-Bf-F along the lines of Hendrix’s classic “The Wind Cries Mary.” Live versions of this song reveal great inventiveness over the one chord, F, along the lines of <strong>FIGURES 8 and 9.</strong></p> <p>In <strong>FIGURE 10</strong>, fifth-string-root voicings are used to illustrate other chord embellishment ideas. As always, feel free to experiment with your own inventions once you have these techniques firmly under your fingers.</p> <p>The last example, <strong>FIGURE 11</strong>, illustrates a few more commonly used Hendrix techniques for embellishing a sixth-string-root chord, with quick hammer/pulls on the G string followed by a chord resolution to A/Cs. You’ll hear great examples of this on Jimi’s “Bold as Love.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="370" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/XKSjRfDfP5A?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-01-13%20at%202.50.48%20PM.png" width="620" height="723" alt="Screen Shot 2015-01-13 at 2.50.48 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-01-13%20at%202.50.58%20PM.png" width="620" height="272" alt="Screen Shot 2015-01-13 at 2.50.58 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-01-13%20at%202.56.11%20PM.png" width="620" height="730" alt="Screen Shot 2015-01-13 at 2.56.11 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-01-13%20at%202.56.20%20PM.png" width="620" height="407" alt="Screen Shot 2015-01-13 at 2.56.20 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimi-hendrix">Jimi Hendrix</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-jimi-hendrixs-little-wing#comments 2011 Andy Aledort December December 2011 In Deep Jimi Hendrix In Deep with Andy Aledort News Lessons Magazine Wed, 29 Jul 2015 13:07:40 +0000 Andy Aledort 13150 at http://www.guitarworld.com Quick Lick: Metallica — "Ride the Lightning" http://www.guitarworld.com/quick-lick-metallica-ride-lightning <!--paging_filter--><p><em>Quick Licks brings you short, bite-sized video lessons that show you how to play classic riffs from your favorite songs.</em></p> <p>In the following video, <em>Guitar World</em>'s Matt Scharfglass shows you how to play the post-chorus riff to the title track off Metallica's sophomore album, <em>Ride the Lightning</em>.</p> <p>Check it out below!</p> <p>And while you're at it, you might enjoy <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/metallicas-kirk-hammett-talks-ride-lightning-cliff-burton-and-benefits-taking-guitar-lessons-joe-satriani">Metallica's Kirk Hammett Talks 'Ride the Lightning,' Cliff Burton and Benefits of Taking Guitar Lessons from Joe Satriani.</a></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1107825890001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1107825890001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/metallica">Metallica</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/quick-lick-metallica-ride-lightning#comments Big Four Metallica Ride the Lightning Videos Features Lessons Tue, 28 Jul 2015 17:38:43 +0000 Matt Scharfglass 12600 at http://www.guitarworld.com Bent Out of Shape: Add Some "Speed" to Your Playing with a Simple Shred-Style Lick http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-add-some-speed-your-playing-simple-shred-style-lick <!--paging_filter--><p>If you've read my previous columns, you might have caught on to the fact that I'm not a fan of purely technique-based solos. I prefer a more melodic approach to lead guitar playing. </p> <p>However, sometimes in rock and metal, there are moments when fast, "shred style" licks are appropriate. Most of my previous lessons focus on the melodic side of my playing, so I wanted to switch things up and give you a simple "shred" lick that's easy to learn and has many applications. </p> <p>In its most basic form, the lick is a sequence of six notes played as a sextuplet or two sets of triplets (depending on the tempo). The notes are played on the same string, which makes it very easy to alternate-pick and build speed. </p> <p>Once you have mastered the basic pattern, you can apply the lick to different scales and positions to give an almost endless amount of variations. </p> <p>I'm going to guide you through the basic form and then show you a few more of my favorite ideas.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F110358844"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab1_3.jpg" width="620" height="70" alt="tab1_3.jpg" /></p> <p>The basic form is played using the first three notes of the E minor scale on the high E string at the 12th fret. Memorize the pattern, then loop it up to create an alternate picking exercise. As with any other speed-building exercise, use a metronome to track your progress.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab2_4.jpg" width="620" height="70" alt="tab2_4.jpg" /></p> <p>When you are comfortable with the pattern, try moving it through every set of three notes within the E minor scale starting on the fifth fret of the B string. This is a nice ascending pattern that will help you memorize how to play entire scales on one string.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab3_3.jpg" width="620" height="70" alt="tab3_3.jpg" /></p> <p>This is the same approach, but it utilizes switching strings to expand the range of the pattern. An accomplished musician will be able to play any scale vertically and horizontally across the neck and be able to switch between the two at any position within the scale. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab4_1.jpg" width="620" height="70" alt="tab4_1.jpg" /></p> <p>You don't have to stay with just groups of three notes. This idea expands the original pattern into an E minor arpeggio. Yngwie Malmsteen uses a similar lick in "Far Beyond the Sun."</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab5.jpg" width="620" height="70" alt="tab5.jpg" /></p> <p>This final idea is taken from one one of my own solos where I change the feel of the pattern by switching to 16th notes. I change the sequence slightly to make a pattern of 16th notes to fit nicely into a bar. To do this, I play the original six-note pattern twice and then play an additional four notes to complete the bar. This creates an interesting dynamic and makes the lick sound less like an exercise.</p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England who now lives in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and toured Japan, the U.S. and Canada in 2012. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-add-some-speed-your-playing-simple-shred-style-lick#comments Bent Out of Shape Will Wallner Blogs Lessons Tue, 28 Jul 2015 16:10:32 +0000 Will Wallner 19252 at http://www.guitarworld.com Time to Burn with Michael Angelo Batio: Applying Sweep Picking to Chord Progressions, Part 2 — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/time-burn-michael-angelo-batio-applying-sweep-picking-chord-progressions-part-2-video/24934 <!--paging_filter--><p>Last month, I introduced the concept of applying different sweep-picked arpeggio shapes to a series of chords within a repeating progression. </p> <p>This month, I’d like to expand our view to a greater variety of sweep-picked shapes, as well as a more complex, ambitious chord progression.</p> <p>To quickly review, a sweep—also often referred to as a rake—is the term used to describe dragging the pick across a series of adjacent strings in a single stroke, either a downstroke or an upstroke. Ascending melodies are played with downstroke sweeps and descending melodies are played with upstroke sweeps.</p> <p>Sweep picking is the most effective guitar technique for replicating the fast arpeggio-based lines often heard in classical piano and violin music. Johann Sebastian Bach, for example, composed a suite of musical etudes (exercises) for violinists called the Sonatas and Partitas for Solo Violin, many of which feature long passages of arpeggios that melodically outline a chord progression using only single notes, with no accompaniment. </p> <p>A common progression heard in these pieces is one that moves through the cycle of fourths. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 1</strong> offers a seven-bar exercise that does this in the key of D minor: starting on Dm, the progression moves up a fourth to Gm, followed by C, F, and Bb, each arpeggio being rooted a fourth above (or a fifth below) the previous chord. In bar 6, I move from Bb down to A7b9 as a means to set up a V-i (five to one-minor) resolution back to Dm. This A7b9 chord may also be analyzed as Edim7, Gdim7, Bbdim7 or C#dim7, superimposed over an A root note. Once I resolve the diminished-type sound of A7b9 to A major, I then resolve back to Dm.</p> <p>For virtually every chord in the progression, a sweep arpeggio based on a steady rhythm of 16th-note triplets is employed, with an upbeat “pickup” used on the preceding eighth-note upbeat, so that the highest note of each arpeggio shape falls on the downbeat of beat one or three. Additionally, for each chord, the initial arpeggio shape is played across two beats, followed by a shift to the next higher arpeggio shape, or inversion, for one beat, followed by a return to the previous lower-voiced arpeggio shape. </p> <p>Be sure to follow the pick stroke indications above the tablature, and strive to articulate each note clearly and distinctly. Use fret-hand muting to quickly silence the previous notes you’ve just played so that they don’t ring, or “bleed,” together, which takes away from the melodic sweep effect and makes it sound like you’re just strumming a chord shape.</p> <p>At the very end of bar 5 and into bar 6, I sequence through three different inversions and positions of a diminished-seven shape across the top three strings, starting in 12th position and then quickly shifting down down in minor-third (three-fret) intervals twice, to ninth and sixth positions. At the end of bar 6 and into bar 7, I switch to a larger A major arpeggio shape that spans the top five strings in a faster quintuplet rhythm before finally resolving to Dm on beat two of bar 7. Be sure to play through this long sequence slowly and deliberately before ramping up the tempo. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/l_dx2hkbN6Q" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-07-13%20at%2012.35.37%20PM.png" width="620" height="328" alt="Screen shot 2015-07-13 at 12.35.37 PM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-07-13%20at%2012.35.54%20PM.png" width="620" height="407" alt="Screen shot 2015-07-13 at 12.35.54 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/michael-angelo-batio-0">Michael Angelo Batio</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/time-burn-michael-angelo-batio-applying-sweep-picking-chord-progressions-part-2-video/24934#comments Michael Angelo Batio September 2015 Time to Burn Artist Lessons Videos Lessons Magazine Mon, 27 Jul 2015 13:06:24 +0000 Michael Angelo Batio 24934 at http://www.guitarworld.com Sublime With Rome: "Wherever You Go" Lesson with Rome Ramirez — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/sublime-rome-wherever-you-go-lesson-rome-ramirez-video/25056 <!--paging_filter--><p>Today, GuitarWorld.com presents an exclusive Sublime with Rome lesson video featuring Rome Ramirez.</p> <p>The track, "Wherever You Go," is from the band's new album, <em>Sirens,</em> which was released July 17 via BMG Chrysalis. You can hear the official audio of the track in the YouTube player at the bottom of this story.</p> <p>Co-produced by Paul Leary and Rome, the 11-song album follows the band’s 2011 debut, <em>Yours Truly.</em> Sublime with Rome features original Sublime bassist Eric Wilson, vocalist and guitarist Rome and drummer Josh Freese.</p> <p>The band also just kicked off their biggest North American tour to date. You can check out all the remaining summer dates below the lesson video.</p> <p><strong>For more about Sublime with Rome, visit <a href="http://sublimewithrome.com/">sublimewithrome.com</a> and follow them on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/sublimewithrome?fref=ts">Facebook.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/6I3BeqMpR00" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>SUBLIME WITH ROME – 2015 TOUR DATES:</strong></p> <p>07/23 – Maryland Heights, MO @ Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre<br /> 07/24 – Indianapolis, IN @ Farm Bureau Insurance Lawn at White River State Park<br /> 07/25 – Rochester Hills, MI @ Meadow Brook<br /> 07/26 – Toronto, ON @ TD Echo Beach<br /> 07/28 – Cleveland, OH @ Jacobs Pavilion at Nautica<br /> 07/29 – Cincinnati, OH @ PNC Pavilion<br /> 07/30 – Glen Allen, VA @ Innsbrook After Hours/Innsbrook Pavilion<br /> 07/31 – Philadelphia, PA @ Festival Pier at Penn’s Landing<br /> 08/01 – Mt. Pocono, PA @ Sherman Theatre Summer Stage<br /> 08/02 – Holmdel, NJ @ PNC Bank Arts Center<br /> 08/04 – Canandaigua, NY @ Constellations Brands – Marvin Sands PAC<br /> 08/05 – New York, NY @ JBL Live at Pier 97<br /> 08/06 – Uncasville, CT @ Mohegan Sun Casino<br /> 08/07 – Boston, MA @ Blue Hills Bank Pavilion<br /> 08/08 – Baltimore, MD @ Pier Six Pavilion<br /> 08/10 – Raleigh, NC @ Red Hat Amphitheater<br /> 08/11 – Charlotte, NC @ Uptown Amphitheatre at the Music Factory<br /> 08/12 – Charleston, SC @ Family Circle Cup Stadium<br /> 08/14 – Tampa, FL @ MIDFLORIDA Credit Union Amphitheatre<br /> 08/15 – Miami, FL @ Klipsch Amphitheater at Bayfront Park<br /> 08/16 – St. Augustine, FL @ St. Augustine Amphitheatre<br /> 08/18 – Nashville, TN @ Riverfront Park<br /> 08/19 – Kansas City, MO @ Power &amp; Light District<br /> 08/20 – Chicago, IL @ FirstMerit Bank Pavilion at Northerly Island<br /> 08/22 – Morrison, CO @ Red Rocks Amphitheatre<br /> 08/23 – Salt Lake City, UT @ USANA Amphitheatre<br /> 08/25 – Albuquerque, NM @ Isleta Amphitheatre<br /> 08/27 – Nampa, ID @ Idaho Center Amphitheatre<br /> 08/28 – Eugene, OR @ Cuthbert Amphitheatre<br /> 08/29 – Redmond, WA @ Marymoor Amphitheater<br /> 08/30 – Redmond, WA @ Marymoor Amphitheater<br /> * 09/05 – South Padre Island, TX @ Clayton’s Beach Bar</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/c2vD4vHc4to" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/sublime-rome-wherever-you-go-lesson-rome-ramirez-video/25056#comments Lesson Rome Ramirez Sublime Sublime With Rome Wherever You Go Videos News Lessons Thu, 23 Jul 2015 15:51:54 +0000 Guitar World Staff 25056 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jazz Guitar Corner: Channel Allan Holdsworth with Four-Note-Per-String Scales http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-channel-allan-holdsworth-four-note-string-scales <!--paging_filter--><p>I often get asked about two topics: How to play in a modern style and how to break out of box patterns. Though these are two separate ideas, I often start by giving one answer: Check out four-note-per-string scales.</p> <p>Used by modern players such as Allan Holdsworth, whose playing inspired me to check out these fingerings, four-note-per-string scales can help bring a more modern flavor to your lines, expand your knowledge of the neck and allow you to cover a large amount of fretboard real estate with just one scale shape, all of which are beneficial to players looking to explore non-traditional scale fingerings in their playing. </p> <p>In this week’s article, we’ll be looking at how to play and practice four-note-per-string scales, as well as how to add slurs into the mix in order to get a bit of that “slippery” Holdsworth legato sound into your lines. </p> <p><strong>4 Note Per String Scales</strong></p> <p>These scales are built exactly as their name suggests, by playing four notes on each string as you climb up the neck, then simply reversing this approach on the way down. </p> <p>While these scales lie nicely under the fingers once you get them down, there are two roadblocks many players face when exploring these scales for the first time, finding the notes and finding a fingering that works for you.</p> <p>When first digging into a new four-note-per-string scale, such as the F major scale below, you will need to figure out the notes on the scale and build your fingering up from there. </p> <p>Here is the process I used to work out the notes in the example below. </p> <p>• Pick a scale, in this case F major<br /> • Write out the notes of that scale, F G A Bb C D E<br /> • Start on the tonic, F, and play the first four notes of the scale on the 6th string, F G A Bb<br /> • Then, move to the next note in the scale, C, on the 5th string and play the next four notes, C D E F<br /> • Repeat this process up all 6 strings</p> <p>So the process for learning the fingering for this scale is different from a typical box pattern or in-position two-octave scale, which can make it a bit tricky at first. But it does have the added side effect of shoring up your knowledge of the notes on the neck at the same time that you learn the scale, so it’s a worthwhile exercise for both of these reasons. </p> <p>As far as the fingering is concerned, it will depend on your hand and finger size and dexterity. I play these scales with one finger per note, 1-2-3-4 across each string, but not everyone will feel comfortable with this fingering. </p> <p>If you find that the 1-2-3-4 fingering on each string is uncomfortable, you also can try 1-1-2-4, 1-2-4-4 or other combinations of these fingers that sit well with your hands on the guitar. </p> <p>Check out this scale below, and then take it to as many keys as you can across the neck before moving on to the slur exercises that follow. Depending on how many frets you have, you may be able to get it up to the key of C, if you have 24 or Bb if you have 22. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%201%20JPG_1.jpg" width="620" height="158" alt="Example 1 JPG_1.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Adding 1 Slur To 4NPS Scales</strong></p> <p>Now that you’ve checked out a four-note-per-string fingering on the guitar, we’ll begin to add in slurs, hammers and pull-offs in order to give these scales that “slippery” sound you hear when they’re used by players such as Holdsworth. </p> <p>All of the exercises below are also great for building fretting-hand technique, but they can also be very tiring on the fingers and fretting hand. So go slow with these exercises, and if your hand begins to feel sore or overtired, just take a break, go have a cup of coffee or take the dog for a walk, then come back to this exercise when your hands are fresh. </p> <p>We’ll being the slur exercises with three different ways to add one hammer on the way up the scale and one pull-off on the way down. In the first example you will see a slur added between the first and second notes on each string. </p> <p>When you are coming down the scale, keep that same approach, putting a slur between the first and second notes on each string, but just use a pull-off when descending the scale fingering. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%202%20JPG_1.jpg" width="620" height="158" alt="Example 2 JPG_1.jpg" /></p> <p>The next variation will feature a slur between the second and third notes on each string. Again, use a hammer going up the scale and a pull-off on the way back down. To get the most out of these exercises, make sure to use a metronome, starting at a slow tempo and slowly increasing the speed as you work these scale and slur variations in different keys across the neck. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%203%20JPG_2.jpg" width="620" height="161" alt="Example 3 JPG_2.jpg" /></p> <p>The last one-slur example we’ll check out features a slur between the third and fourth notes. Once you have any/all of these slurs under your fingers, put on a backing track, maybe a static Fmaj7 chord or a ii-V-I progression in the key of F major, then improvise using this scale fingering and slur variations. </p> <p>The best way to see if you have really learned a new concept is to take it out and make some music with it. So, don’t feel like you have to get all of these ideas down before you begin to solo with them, just learn one slur option then go blow with it for a bit over a backing track. Then when that’s comfortable move on to the next slur and repeat the technique-improv loop. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%204%20JPG_1.jpg" width="620" height="163" alt="Example 4 JPG_1.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Adding 2 Slurs to 4 NPS Scales</strong></p> <p>Since there are four notes on every string when using these fingerings, you can also practice adding two slurs in a row on each string of the scale. The concept is the same as when you added one slur, use hammers on the way up and pull-offs on the way down to complete the exercise. </p> <p>In the first example you will be adding a slur between the first, second and third notes on each string. </p> <p>If you are using the 1-1-2-4 fingering instead of 1-2-3-4, you can use a slide between the first two notes so that the slur becomes a slide plus a hammer on the way up and a slide plus a pull-off on the way down. This will allow you to work these slurs into the scale if you use an alternate fingering. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%205%20JPG_0.jpg" width="620" height="161" alt="Example 5 JPG_0.jpg" /></p> <p>You can also add two slurs to the back end of each string but placing a slur between the second, third and fourth notes on each string in the scale. Again, if you are using the 1-2-4-4 fingering for each string, then you could do a hammer plus a slide going up and a pull-off plus a slide going down to achieve the same effect. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%206%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="163" alt="Example 6 JPG.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Adding 3 Slurs to 4 NPS Scales</strong></p> <p>Lastly, you can use slurs on all of the notes on each string, so only picking the first note and then slurring for the rest of the notes on each string in the scale. This type of legato approach is indicative of the Holdsworth style, so if you are going for that sound, this is a variation that you will want to check out and get under your fingers. </p> <p>Since there are more slides than picks, many players tend to lose focus on the time and rhythm with this exercise. A good way to avoid this is to set the metronome to 8th notes and then play one note per click to make sure each note is accurately placed within the bar. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%207%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="163" alt="Example 7 JPG.jpg" /></p> <p>Though not as common as in-position, the CAGED system or three-note-per-string scales, using four notes on each string can help you learn the notes of the neck, add more legato to your lines and break you out of box patterns at the same time. </p> <p>Do you use four-note-per-string scales in your playing or have a favorite way to practice them in the woodshed? Please share your thoughts in the comment section below. </p> <p><em>Photo: Matt Warnock</em></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/PvEs8KvcBmY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com/">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a senior lecturer at the Leeds College of Music and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-channel-allan-holdsworth-four-note-string-scales#comments Allan Holdsworth Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Thu, 23 Jul 2015 15:09:28 +0000 Matt Warnock 15867 at http://www.guitarworld.com Slash Shows You How to Play Guns N' Roses' "Paradise City" — Video Lesson http://www.guitarworld.com/video-lesson-slash-shows-you-how-play-guns-n-roses-paradise-city <!--paging_filter--><p>Around the release of his eponymous debut solo album, Slash took the time out to show us how to play some of his favorite riffs, both new and old. </p> <p>In the <em>Guitar World</em> video below, Slash talks about writing the classic Guns N' Roses tune "Paradise City." He also shows you how to play the key parts of the <em>Appetite for Destruction</em> track.</p> <p>Slash's latest studio album—<em>World on Fire</em>—was counted among <em>Guitar World's</em> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/guitar-worlds-50-best-albums-2014">50 Best Albums of 2014.</a> </p> <p>Enjoy!</p> <p><em>Photo: Robert John</em></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/nEq1tKM4v2k" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/slash">Slash</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/guns-n039-roses">Guns N&#039; Roses</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-lesson-slash-shows-you-how-play-guns-n-roses-paradise-city#comments Guns N' Roses May 2010 Slash Videos News Lessons Magazine Thu, 23 Jul 2015 14:10:48 +0000 Guitar World Staff 15012 at http://www.guitarworld.com Metal for Life: Examining Five Essential Minor Mode Scale Patterns — with Tab and Video http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-modal-citizen-examining-five-essential-minor-mode-scale-patterns <!--paging_filter--><p>This month, we will continue our modal study by focusing on two essential minor modes, Dorian and Aeolian. </p> <p>Both of these modes can be looked at as “extensions” of the scale that is used most prominently for soloing in metal, minor pentatonic. A scale well familiar to most rock, blues and metal players, minor pentatonic is a five-note scale, spelled 1 b3 4 5 b7, in terms of its interval structure. </p> <p>Both the Dorian and Aeolian modes are seven-note scales, and in each case two scale degrees are added to minor pentatonic. Dorian adds the major second (2) and major sixth (6) degrees, resulting in an intervallic structure of 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7. Aeolian adds the major second and minor, or “flat,” sixth (b6) scale degrees and is spelled 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7.</p> <p>Let’s focus on the Dorian mode first, using the key of G minor. In <strong>FIGURES 1–5</strong>, I progress through five fretboard positions of G Dorian (G A Bb C D E F), first hitting a G5 power chord in order to strengthen our connection to the key of G.</p> <p>In <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, I ascend and descend through G Dorian in a pattern that spans second and third positions. The intervals/scale degrees are indicated for the first seven notes below the tab. Recite the names of the scale degrees as you play each note, and strive to memorize each note’s intervallic role as well as the order in which they fall.</p> <p>In <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, I move up to the next scale pattern for G Dorian, for which the index finger is rooted at the fifth fret throughout. Likewise, play this scale ascending and descending several times in order to work it into your fret-hand muscle memory as well as to memorize the scale in this position.</p> <p>In <strong>FIGURES 3–5</strong>, I progressively move up to higher scale positions. <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> is played in seventh-eighth position, <strong>FIGURE 4</strong> spans ninth-10th position, and <strong>FIGURE 5</strong> is played in 12th position. </p> <p>For these patterns, I like to use alternate picking throughout when ascending and descending, playing through each slowly so that every note sounds clearly. Once you have the patterns memorized and comfortable under your fingers, increase the speed while keeping your focus on clear articulation and precision with both hands.</p> <p>The next step is to switch from Dorian to Aeolian, which requires the altering of only one note: the sixth degree of G Dorian, E, moves down one fret, or half step, to Eb. Altering this one note yields the G Aeolian mode (G A Bb C D Eb F), illustrated in five essential fretboard patterns in <strong>FIGURES 6–10</strong>.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/pmv-2VhJPtA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-07-22%20at%201.51.09%20PM.png" width="718" height="510" alt="Screen shot 2015-07-22 at 1.51.09 PM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-07-22%20at%201.51.29%20PM.png" width="620" height="555" alt="Screen shot 2015-07-22 at 1.51.29 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-modal-citizen-examining-five-essential-minor-mode-scale-patterns#comments July 2013 Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak Videos Lessons Magazine Wed, 22 Jul 2015 20:32:16 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak 18428 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jazz Guitar Corner: Using Two-Note Chords to Play the Blues, Part 1 http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-using-two-note-chords-play-blues-part-1 <!--paging_filter--><p>When learning how to play jazz guitar, one of the main items we need to tackle is playing effective, jazzy-sounding chords that properly outline the chord changes all at the same time. </p> <p>While this may seem like a tall order, there are some easy-to-play and effective shapes we can learn in order to quickly and effectively outline any tune or progression we are jamming on in the woodshed or on the bandstand. </p> <p>In today’s lesson, we’ll be looking at some of my favorite chord shapes, 3rds and 7ths, as applied to the third and fourth strings of the guitar, and then played over an A blues chord progression. We will be exploring these shapes further in this series of articles, so make sure to check back for more articles that dig further into two-note chords as applied to various jazz-guitar situations. </p> <p><strong>What Are 3rd and 7th Chords?</strong></p> <p>Before we learn how to apply these shapes to the third and fourth string set on the guitar, let’s take a look at exactly what 3rd and 7th, two-note shapes are and why they work so well when used in a harmonic situation on the guitar. </p> <p>The biggest reason these shapes work so well on the guitar? They are small, easy-to-play shapes—but they still outline the underlying chords and progression at the same time. </p> <p>Here's an example of an A7 chord broken up into an arpeggio and then laid out as a chord, with the 3rd and 7th from each of those shapes extracted in the bar next to the arp and chord. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/3rds%20and%207ths%20A%20Blues%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="156" alt="3rds and 7ths A Blues JPG.jpg" /></p> <p>As you can see, the 3rd and 7th are found in both the A7 arpeggio and chord. You are simply removing the root and 5th of both of those shapes, leaving you with a two-note chord grip on the fretboard. </p> <p>You may be asking yourself, “But if we remove the root, how can we hear the underlying chord?” That’s a good question and something we should address before moving on. </p> <p>Even though there is no root in these shapes, you can still hear the underlying chord and progression when applying it to a tune for the following reasons: </p> <p>01. The 3rd of any chord tells you whether it’s a major- or minor-based chord. </p> <p>02. The 7th of any chord tells you whether a major based chord is a maj7 or 7th chord—and whether a minor based chord is a m7 or mMaj7 chord. </p> <p>So, as you can see, even though the root isn’t in the chord, these two notes can still outline the given harmony very effectively when applied to any tune you know or are working on. </p> <p>There are some situations where you would need another note to fully outline a chord, such as m7b5 or dim7 chord, but for now, we’ll just be looking at m7 and 7th chords over a blues chord progression. We will deal with those shapes in future articles in this series. </p> <p><strong>3rds and 7ths Over A Blues Chords</strong></p> <p>Now that you have an idea of what 3rd and 7th, two-note chord shapes are and how they are built, let’s take a look at how you can apply these fun and cool-sounding chords to an A blues chord progression. </p> <p>Start by playing these chords on your own, with no backing track, so that you can hear how they can sound the harmony of the tune without needing any more accompaniment. </p> <p>From there, try putting on a backing track and using these chords to comp along over an A blues progression to hear how they sound when applied to the underlying harmony. </p> <p>Here's an example of applying 3rd and 7th chords on the third and fourth strings beginning with the notes G and C# for the A7 chord in bar one of the form. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/3rds%20and%207ths%20A%20Blues%202%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="493" alt="3rds and 7ths A Blues 2 JPG.jpg" /></p> <p>And here's an example of applying those same 3rds and 7ths, on the same string set, but this time with C# and G being the starting notes for the A7 chord in bar one of the form.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/3rds%20and%207ths%20A%20Blues%203%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="493" alt="3rds and 7ths A Blues 3 JPG.jpg" /> </p> <p>Though you are only using two notes per chord, when you play through the above examples, you can still hear the harmonic movement and chord progression for the underlying A blues form. </p> <p>This is one of the reasons two-note chords are so important to learn. They perfectly outline a chord progression and they also are very easy to play on the guitar, freeing up your fingers to add extensions and other colors on top of these shapes as you take them further. </p> <p><strong>Practicing 3rds and 7ths Over Blues</strong></p> <p>After sampling the two-note chords in the above examples, here are five exercises you can try in order to take these shapes further in the practice room: </p> <p>01. Sing the root of each chord in an A blues while playing the 3rds and 7ths from the first example on the guitar. </p> <p>02. Sing the root of each chord in an A blues while playing the 3rds and 7ths from the second example on the guitar. </p> <p>03. Comp through an A blues with the shapes from Example 1, varying the rhythms as you move through the changes. </p> <p>04. Comp through an A blues with the shapes from Example 2, varying the rhythms as you move through the changes. </p> <p>05. Repeat the above four exercises in 12 keys and at various tempos on the metronome. </p> <p>There you have it—a brief introduction to using two-note chords to play an A blues on the guitar. Simple, fun to play shapes that are highly effective and sound great when applied to a solo, duo or combo situation. </p> <p>Do you have a question about these two-note chords? Post your thoughts in the COMMENTS section below. </p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a lecturer in Popular Music Performance at the University of Chester and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-using-two-note-chords-play-blues-part-1#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Wed, 22 Jul 2015 17:49:50 +0000 Matt Warnock 18921 at http://www.guitarworld.com