Lessons http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/8/0 en LessonFace with Steve Stine: Spread Fingering — Absolute Fretboard Mastery, Part 7 http://www.guitarworld.com/lessonface-steve-stine-spread-fingering-absolute-fretboard-mastery-part-7 <!--paging_filter--><p><strong>Steve Stine, highly sought-after guitar educator, teaches live online group and private classes at <a href="https://www.lessonface.com/">Lessonface.com</a>.</strong></p> <p>Hey, guys! Welcome back to my ongoing "Absolute Fretboard Mastery" series. </p> <p>In this month’s edition, we’re going to be drawing on the knowledge of chord progressions that we touched on <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/lessonface-steve-stine-absolute-fretboard-mastery-part-6-chord-progressions-video">last month</a> and the pentatonic expansion theories we covered in the months before to finally get into a fully fledged major scale. </p> <p>By the way, be sure to check out all the previous parts of "Absolute Fretboard Mastery" under RELATED CONTENT, which you'll find directly below my photo to the left.</p> <p>So, to start things off, let’s take a look at a C major scale in the following shape: </p> <p>Insert Scale Chart 1</p> <p>This is what is called a "spread fingering shape." When I was first learning my scales, I didn’t learn them in this spread-fingering shape. I learned them in what’s commonly referred to as the "box positions." The same C major scale played using a box position would look like this:</p> <p>Insert Scale Chart 2</p> <p>While these box positions are great for navigating the fretboard, something I've learned with them is that they can feel pretty awkward to play and to speed up — which is why the spread-fingering position made a lot more sense to me when I started learning it. </p> <p>For one thing, the symmetry of the spread fingering position is far easier to process on a visual level. If we were to break up the note groupings on each two strings, they would look like this:</p> <p>Insert Scale Chart 3</p> <p>As you can see, the patterns of notes is the same on the sixth and fifth, fourth and third and second and first strings. This visual symmetry of the spread-fingering shape make it far easier to memorize and also far easier to navigate while playing. Something you also will notice with this spread-fingering shape is that, because you are playing three notes on each string, instead of switching between two and three notes like in the box positions, it is far easier to maintain a consistent picking pattern throughout the scale. This, in turn, makes this shape far smoother to play and far easier to speed up. </p> <p>Another great thing about this spread-fingering shape is that, from a theoretical perspective, it makes it much easier to visualize your scale intervals and to navigate across them. Say, for instance, you want to figure out how your I, III and V intervals sound when played together. You can do so easily by using this spread fingering position. </p> <p>Insert Scale Chart 4</p> <p>When it comes to your soloing, this familiarity with your scale intervals is important because it can help you get a feel of what notes to play and when to play them. Say, for instance, you’re soloing over a C chord. By now you’ll know that the I, III and V intervals of the scale are going to sound comfortable. But ideally at this point you should start experimenting with adding the II, IV and VI notes to add more color to your solos. The visual ease of recognizing these scale intervals with the spread fingering position will make it much easier for you to expand your playing into what we call "intervallic playing" instead of simply playing up and down the scale. </p> <p>You see, memorizing these scale positions and notes is the easy part about playing guitar. The real challenge is in using this knowledge and theory to create actual music. So the first thing I want you to do this month is to learn and memorize this shape, not just in C but across the entire fretboard. The second thing I want you to do is to start experimenting with it over a C major jam track. And while you’re doing that, what I really want you to focus on is going beyond the I, III and V notes and really exploring the sound of the II, IV and VI notes over the jam track. </p> <p>Another small thing I want you to work on this month is learning and memorizing the notes on your G string. If you’ve followed my Absolute Fretboard Mastery series from the beginning (Again, see RELATED CONTENT above), you will remember we’ve already learned and memorized the notes on the sixth, fifth and fourth strings. And like with those strings, remember to cross reference the notes you learn on the G string with the notes on the three strings above it. </p> <p>Insert G String Note Chart </p> <p>The reason I want you to cross reference these notes you learn is because it will help you ultimately visualize the notes across your entire fretboard easily and clearly. And this, along with the scale knowledge that we’ve been working on the past few months, all contribute towards your absolute mastery of the fretboard. So as always, practice hard and have fun with your playing, and I’ll see you next month. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/gRHdQ0zz8b4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Steve Stine is a longtime and sought-after guitar teacher who is professor of Modern Guitar Studies at North Dakota State University. Over the last 27 years, he has taught thousands of students, including established touring musicians, and released numerous video guitar lesson courses via established publishers. A resident of Fargo, North Dakota, today he is more accessible than ever before through the convenience of live online guitar lessons at <a href="http://lessonface.go2cloud.org/aff_c?offer_id=7&amp;aff_id=1001">Lessonface.com.</a></em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/lessonface-steve-stine-spread-fingering-absolute-fretboard-mastery-part-7#comments LessonFace Steve Stine Videos Blogs Lessons Fri, 25 Jul 2014 18:49:09 +0000 Steve Stine http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21948 Big Strokes: A Beginner's Guide to Sweeping http://www.guitarworld.com/big-strokes-beginners-guide-sweeping <!--paging_filter--><p>Although often regarded as a “shredder’s” technique, the notion of sweeping (or raking) the pick across the strings to produce a quick succession of notes has been around since the invention of the pick itself. </p> <p>Jazz players from the Fifties, such as Les Paul, Barney Kessel and Tal Farlow, would use the approach in their improvisations, and country guitar genius Chet Atkins was known to eschew his signature fingerstyle hybrid-picking technique from time to time and rip out sweep-picked arpeggios, proving that the technique is not genre specific. Within rock, Ritchie Blackmore used sweep picking to play arpeggios in Deep Purple’s “April” and Rainbow’s “Kill the King.”</p> <p>Fusion maestro Frank Gambale is widely considered to be the most versatile and innovative sweep picker and the first artist to fully integrate the technique into his style, applying sweeping to arpeggios, pentatonics, heptatonic (seven-note) scales and modes, and beyond. </p> <p>Gambale explains his approach wonderfully in his instructional video, <em>Monster Licks and Speed Picking</em>. Originally released in 1988, it remains a must-watch video for anyone interested in developing a smooth sweep-picking technique.</p> <p>It was Stockholm, Sweden, however that would produce the name most synonymous with sweeping in a rock context, one that gave rise to a guitar movement known as neoclassical heavy metal. </p> <p>Swedish guitar virtuoso Yngwie Malmsteen was influenced by Jimi Hendrix, Ritchie Blackmore and Uli Jon Roth but was also equally enthralled by 19th-century virtuoso violinist Niccolò Paganini. Attempting to emulate on his Fender Stratocaster the fluid, breathtaking passages Paganini would compose and play on violin, Malmsteen concluded that sweep picking was the perfect way to travel quickly from string to string with a smooth, fluid sound much like what a violinist can create with his bow. </p> <p>Malmsteen’s style has since influenced two generations of guitarists, including Tony MacAlpine, Jason Becker, Steve Vai, Mattias “IA” Eklundh, Ritchie Kotzen, Marty Friedman, John Petrucci, Vinnie Moore, Jeff Loomis, Synyster Gates, Alexi Laiho and Tosin Abasi, to name but a few.</p> <p>The first five exercises in this lesson are designed to give you a systematic approach to practicing the component movements of sweep picking: from two-string sweeps to six-string sweeps, and everything in between. Practicing each exercise with a metronome for just two minutes every day will improve your coordination and your confidence to use the technique in your own playing. </p> <p>Work from two strings up to six, keeping your metronome at the same tempo. This means starting with eighth notes, and while this will feel very slow, the technique will become trickier with each successive note grouping: eighth-note triplets, 16th notes, quintuplets and, most difficult of all, 16th-note triplets and their equivalent sextuplets. Focus on synchronizing your hands so that your pick and fretting fingers make contact with the string at exactly the same moment. Only one string should be fretted at any time (this is key!), and any idle strings should be diligently muted with your remaining fingers. </p> <p>If you fail to do this and allow notes on adjacent strings to ring together, it will negate the desired effect and sound like you are simply strumming a chord. When it comes to sweep picking, muting is the key to cleanliness. It is also the aspect that will take the most practice to master.</p> <p>The second set of five exercises handles some common sweep-picking approaches. These are shown in one position and based on one chord type each, thus focusing your attention on the exercise until you have become accustomed to the technique. </p> <p>The final piece helps you tackle the various aspects of sweeping while bolstering your stamina, as the bulk of it consists of nonstop 16th notes, with only a few pauses for “breathing.” Break it down into four-bar sections and practice each with a metronome, gradually building up to the 100-beats-per-minute (100bpm) target tempo. </p> <p><strong>Get the Tone</strong></p> <p>In rock, this technique is best suited to Strat-style guitars, using the neck pickup setting for a warm, round tone. Use a modern tube amp with the gain set to a moderate amount—just enough to give all the notes a uniform volume and sustain, but not so much that string muting becomes an impossible battle. </p> <p>The thickness and sharpness of your pick will hugely impact the tone of your sweep picking. Something with a thickness between one and two millimeters and a rounded tip will provide the right amount of attack and still glide over the strings with ease.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_1_2.jpg" /></p> <p>[FIGURE 1] This Cmaj7 arpeggio on the two middle strings works just as well on the top two or bottom two. Lightly drag your pick across (push down, pull up) the two strings so that there’s very little resistance. This teaches your picking hand to make smooth motions rather than two separate downward or upward strokes.</p> <p>FIGURE 2 is a C7 arpeggio played across three strings. Strive to maintain the same smooth down/up motion with your pick used in the previous example. Focus on the pick strokes that land on downbeats, and allow the in-between, or “offbeat,” notes to naturally fall into place. Every three notes your pick will change direction. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_3.jpg" /></p> <p>Now let’s move on to four strings with this exotic C7 altered-dominant lick, reminiscent of one of Gambale’s fusion forays. Remember, sweep picking is most effective when each note is cleanly separated from the last, so aim to have only one finger in contact with the fretboard at a time in order to keep the notes from ringing together.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_4.jpg" /></p> <p>Now we move on to some five-string shapes, the likes of which you can hear in the playing of Steve Vai and Mattias Eklundh. The phrasing here is 16th-note quintuplets (five notes per beat). Once again, if you focus on nailing the highest and lowest notes along with the beat, the in-between notes should automatically fall into place. Move your pick at a constant speed to ensure the notes are evenly spaced. Say “Hip-po-pot-a-mus” to get the sound of properly performed quintuplets in your mind’s ear.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_5.jpg" /></p> <p>This six-string arpeggio is an A major triad (A Cs E), with the third in the bass and a fifth interval added to the high E string’s 12th fret, so we have the right number of notes for 16th-note triplets (six notes per click). When ascending, use a single motion to pick all six strings, making sure only one note is fretted at a time. The descending section includes a pull-off on the high E string, which, although momentarily disruptive to your picking, is preferable to adding another downstroke.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_6.jpg" /></p> <p>This major triad shape is an essential part of the Yngwie Malmsteen school of sweeping. Pay special attention to the picking directions in both the ascending and descending fragments. The alternating eighth-note triplet and quarter-note phrasing allows you to focus on the picking pattern in small bursts and then rest for a beat.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_7.jpg" /></p> <p>This example includes ascending and descending fragments again, this time played together. Concentrate on the general down-up motion of your picking hand rather than each pick stroke. Once you are comfortable with this shape you can apply the same approach to minor, suspended and diminished-seven arpeggios.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_8.jpg" /> </p> <p>This example is reminiscent of players such as Jason Becker and Jeff Loomis. We start with the three-string shapes from the previous example, followed by the six-string shape from FIGURE 5. This is quite challenging for the picking hand, so start very slowly and remember to keep the hand moving smoothly.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_9.jpg" /></p> <p>Here we utilize two-string sweeps with pentatonic shapes. Use your first finger on the fifth fret and third finger on the seventh fret. Keep your fingers flat against the two-string groups, and transfer pressure between strings using a rolling action to mute inactive strings and prevent notes from ringing together. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_10.jpg" /></p> <p>Economy picking requires that your pick take the shortest journey possible when crossing from string to string. This essentially means that when you play a scale, there will be a two-string mini-sweep whenever you move to an adjacent string. This exercise combines the eight-note B whole-half diminished scale (B Cs D E F G Gs As) and a Bdim7 arpeggio (B D F Gs).</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_11.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_11cont.jpg" /></p> <p>This piece is in the key of A minor. The first part is based around a “V-i” (five-one) progression, with the arpeggios clearly outlining the implied chord changes. We begin with some ascending two-string sweeps using alternating E (E Gs B) and Bf (Bf D F) triads. Next come some A minor triads (A C E), played with a progressively increasing number of strings; this is a great way to build your confidence in sweep picking larger shapes. The Bm7f5 (B D F A) arpeggio in bar 4 has a series of three-string sweeps combined with some challenging string skips. Bar 7 is an A minor pentatonic scale (A C D E G) played in fourths using two-string sweeps/economy picking. </p> <p>The second part of the piece has a more neoclassical approach and begins with some Yngwie-style three-string triads incorporating pull-offs. Be sure to follow the indicated picking directions. Bar 12 is the trickiest part of the piece to play and utilizes some Jason Becker–inspired six-string shapes. If you have problems with string muting or note separation, apply some light palm muting to the notes as they are picked. This is an effective way to improve note clarity. The final bar is based on the A harmonic minor scale (A B C E D F Gs) and incorporates economy picking when traveling from the fifth string to the fourth. </p> http://www.guitarworld.com/big-strokes-beginners-guide-sweeping#comments Avenged Sevenfold Guitar 101 Steve Vai Sweep Picking Tosin Abasi Yngwie Malmsteen News Features Lessons Fri, 25 Jul 2014 17:06:12 +0000 Charlie Griffiths http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17113 Betcha Can't Play This: Building Suspense with Andy Timmons — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-building-suspense-andy-timmons-video <!--paging_filter--><p> Here's a cool, suspenseful-sounding climbing run that’s based on the A minor pentatonic scale [A C D E G] and the A Dorian mode [A B C D E F s G].</p> <p> The concept is to ascend the neck on just two strings—in this case the G and D—using a uniform alternate picking pattern applied to shifting positions. </p> <p> What I’m essentially doing here is stringing together groups of 16th notes played in four-note shapes, or modules, and playing mostly two notes per string, with a couple of exceptions here and there wherein I stay on the G string and repeat the first two notes instead of crossing over to the D string.</p> <p> Notice how the contour of the line climbs and falls—kind of like a statistics graph chart—as I ascend a couple of positions, take a step back and then continue ascending. I find this kind of ‘up two, back one’ or ‘up three, back one’ contour more interesting and dramatic than just a straight ascent. It also enables you to prolong a lick by not running out of fretboard as quickly.</p> <p> One valuable thing about this approach, which I’ve worked on a lot, is that it helps you to learn scales up and down the neck, or horizontally, as opposed to just learning them vertically in separate positions. This way of playing and thinking can help you connect ‘blind spots’ and also enables you to maintain a consistent timbre by staying on the same strings throughout a run.</p> <p> As is almost always the case when you’re playing any kind of fast lick like this, it’s important to try to use both hands to mute the strings you’re not playing on to suppress any sympathetic vibrations, which create noise that distortion unfortunately amplifies. The bass strings are best muted by lightly resting the palm of the picking hand on the bridge saddles as you pick the higher strings, while the treble strings may be muted with the fleshy side of the fret-hand fingers.</p> <p>Equally important is that you resolve a lick smoothly. Notice here how I conclude the run with a bend and a hearty finger vibrato, which serves as the icing on the cake.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/n5p-i-jGc0s?list=PL198C391437BDEA9D" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/andy.jpg" width="620" height="205" alt="andy.jpg" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/andy-timmons">Andy Timmons</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-building-suspense-andy-timmons-video#comments Andy Timmons Betcha Can't Play This February 2009 Videos Betcha Can't Play This News Lessons Magazine Thu, 24 Jul 2014 16:42:40 +0000 Andy Timmons http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21923 Betcha Can't Play This: Bill Hudson's Lydian Cascade http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-bill-hudsons-lydian-cascade <!--paging_filter--><p>This is a scalar run based on the F Lydian mode [F G A B C D E], which is the fifth mode of C major. It incorporates several different lead-playing techniques and sounds cool when played over an F or F5 chord.</p> <p>I start off with an ascending F major triad [F A C] sweep across the top four strings, played in a rhythm of 16th-note triplets. </p> <p>Once I hit the high E string, I switch to legato phrasing, continuing the triplet rhythm and using all four fret-hand fingers, spread out wide, to perform "stacked" hammer-ons and pull-offs, capped off by a pick-hand tap with the middle finger.</p> <p> Once I come back down to the F note at the 13th fret, I skip over to the G string, where I play another legato sequence, this time incorporating a descending finger slide followed by two hammer-ons and three consecutive taps with the pick hand, using the first, second and fourth fingers.</p> <p> When performing this tapping sequence, I temporarily clamp the pick between my thumb and the top side of the fretboard. I then jump back up to the high E string and perform another ascending legato sequence, incorporating taps with the first and third fingers. </p> <p> After the last tapped note, I switch to straight alternate picking and play a descending sequence of cascading 16th notes and 16th-note triplets across the top four strings, followed by an ascending climb that finishes with a high bend. When practicing this lick, be mindful of the different rhythmic subdivisions used.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/9Btp369CEsg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-14%20at%201.08.38%20PM.png" width="620" height="379" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-14 at 1.08.38 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-bill-hudsons-lydian-cascade#comments Betcha Can't Play This Bill Hudson February 2011 Videos Blogs News Lessons Magazine Thu, 24 Jul 2014 16:01:22 +0000 Bill Hudson http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21007 Slash Shows You How to Play Guns N' Roses' "Paradise City" — Video Lesson http://www.guitarworld.com/video-lesson-slash-shows-you-how-play-guns-n-roses-paradise-city <!--paging_filter--><p>Around the release of his eponymous debut solo album, Slash took the time out to show us how to play some of his favorite riffs, both new and old. </p> <p>In the <em>Guitar World</em> video below, Slash talks about writing the classic Guns N' Roses tune "Paradise City." He also shows you how to play the key parts of the <em>Appetite for Destruction</em> track.</p> <p>Slash's new studio album — which is still without a title at this point — will be released later this year. You can watch Slash at work on the new album (courtesy of Ernie Ball) <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/video-slash-and-myles-kennedy-studio-ernie-balls-real-reel-slash-volume-7">right here,</a> in a series of seven behind-the-scenes videos.</p> <p>Enjoy!</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1510754330001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="365" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1510754330001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p> Photo: Robert John</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/slash">Slash</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/guns-n039-roses">Guns N&#039; Roses</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-lesson-slash-shows-you-how-play-guns-n-roses-paradise-city#comments Guns N' Roses May 2010 Slash Videos News Lessons Magazine Wed, 23 Jul 2014 14:49:20 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/15012 "Spring (The Return)": Combine Arpeggios, Octave Displacement and Scales for Gloriously Melodic Results http://www.guitarworld.com/spring-return-combine-arpeggios-octave-displacement-and-scales-gloriously-melodic-results <!--paging_filter--><p>In this lesson, I show you how to play the main theme for my song “Spring (The Return)." </p> <p>Getting this song’s main theme under your fingers will help your right- and left-hand technique by tackling string skipping, octave displacement and large intervals, with the added benefit of helping you visualize how chords and scales work together. </p> <p>I wrote the song’s main theme by adding a melodic element to an arpeggio idea I was exploring, borrowed from guitarists Steve Morse and Eric Johnson. The idea is to arpeggiate barre chords whose roots are on the fifth string, but only play the root, fifth and third — leaving out the octave. </p> <p>This produces an interesting sound where the third degree in the arpeggio is placed an octave higher than normally performed. Instead of barring the chord, I use my left hand’s first finger on the root, third finger on the fifth, and fourth finger on the third. (See the photo below.)</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Galysh%20Fig%201.jpg" width="620" height="451" alt="Galysh Fig 1.jpg" /></p> <p>The song's main theme is a series of sixteenth note triplets in the key of E major. The passage starts on the I chord (E major), moves to the vi chord (C# minor), then to the V chord (B major) and finally to the IV chord (A major). Each part of the passage uses the Root-5th-3rd voicing as the basis for its phase, which adds a melodic element on the B string and E string. Notice in the video, I start the phrases by picking: down-up-up-up-up…</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Spring_%28The_Return%29_Lesson.jpg" width="620" height="661" alt="Spring_(The_Return)_Lesson.jpg" /></p> <p>Start slow, and get used to visualizing the E major scale on the first and second strings to help you anticipate where the melody notes will be in each position. I found that it took some practice to really get the triplets to be right in time and play the melody accurately.</p> <p>The play-along track for “Spring (The Return)” is on my new jam-track album, <em>Stripped</em>, which will be available September 2 at <a href="http://www.adriangalysh.com/">AdrianGalysh.com</a> as well as iTunes, amazon.com and CDBaby.com. </p> <p><strong>In the meantime, GuitarWorld.com online readers can <a href="http://adriangalysh.com/download.html">enjoy a FREE download of the song by clicking HERE.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/oseL5_3Fcgo?list=UULNeEhPB9EghJaSxfIoZyWg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Guitarist Adrian Galysh is a solo artist and education coordinator for Guitar Center Studios. He's the author of the book </em>Progressive Guitar Warmups and Exercises<em>. For more information, visit him at <a href="http://www.adriangalysh.com/">AdrianGalysh.com.</a></em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/spring-return-combine-arpeggios-octave-displacement-and-scales-gloriously-melodic-results#comments Adrian Galysh Videos Blogs Lessons Tue, 22 Jul 2014 17:40:37 +0000 Adrian Galysh http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21888 Betcha Can't Play This: Tapping and Skipping with Andy Wood http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-tapping-and-skipping-andy-wood <!--paging_filter--><p>This is a tapping run that incorporates string skipping and a couple of fret-hand finger slides.</p> <p> It’s based on the A natural minor scale [A B C D E F G], but the notes are organized into arpeggios, which imply some interesting "tall" chord sounds. </p> <p>Although it is played in steady 16th notes, it sounds and feels out of time because of the unusual melodic contour.</p> <p> When skipping to another string, often the first note is hammered on "from nowhere" by one of the fret-hand fingers [indicated by "H"]. Strive for an even attack and volume note to note, making each hammer-on quick and firm. When pulling off, flick the string slightly sideways, in toward the palm. </p> <p>I tap a couple of the notes on the high E string with my ring finger, which makes the jumps across the strings a little easier. Mute the strings you’re not playing on with your pick-hand palm to keep them from ringing.</p> <p> The lick ends with a big bend on the B string, which I perform by tapping the string then bending it upward with both hands, using the fret hand’s fingers to help the tapping finger bend the string.</p> <p> For more on Wood and his band, Down from Up, visit <a href="http://www.andywoodmusic.com/">andywoodmusic.com</a> and <a href="http://www.downfromup.com/">downfromup.com</a>. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/uvyxn2kkEVY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-07%20at%203.43.33%20PM.png" width="620" height="393" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-07 at 3.43.33 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-tapping-and-skipping-andy-wood#comments Andy Wood Betcha Can't Play This Down From Up June 2010 Betcha Can't Play This Blogs News Lessons Magazine Mon, 21 Jul 2014 16:37:02 +0000 Andy Wood http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20956 Wild Stringdom with John Petrucci: Combining Triad Arpeggios to Form Polytonal Chordal Allusions http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-combining-triad-arpeggios-form-polytonal-chordal-allusions <!--paging_filter--><p>As I have discussed in previous columns, I often use triadic arpeggio forms within my riffs and solos as a tool to create rich-sounding, poly-chordal sounds. </p> <p> I’d like to continue in that vein in this month’s column by presenting different ways in which to move from one arpeggio form to another, using a series of specific triads that complement one another well.</p> <p> Let’s start with the triads F# diminished and D major, as shown in <strong>FIGURES 1</strong> and <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, respectively. The F# diminished triad is built from the notes C, F# and A, and the D major triad is built from almost the same set of notes, D, F# and A. Both FIGURES 1 and 2 show these triads as played in fifth position for comparison. </p> <p> If I wanted to get a bluesy vibe, I’d use the D major triad and combine it with the F# diminished triad, as demonstrated in <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>. Here, the C note is heard as the b7 (flat seventh) of D, implying a D dominant-seven tonality.</p> <p> Now let’s try combining the F# diminished arpeggio with an A minor arpeggio—A C E—as shown in <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>. The combination of these two sets of notes gives an F#m7b5 arpeggio (F# A C E: see <strong>FIGURE 5</strong>). These licks work well over an Am chord, as the inclusion of the F# note, the major sixth of A, implies an Am6, A Dorian–mode type of sound.</p> <p> As you probably have noticed, all of these arpeggios are played on the top three strings, and I often like to incorporate sweep picking when using arpeggios like this. <strong>FIGURE 6</strong> illustrates a combination of an Em7 arpeggio—E G B D—and a Gmaj7 arpeggio—G B D F#. As denoted in the example, in order to sweep pick these arpeggio shapes properly, begin with an upstroke on the first note and then use a single down-stroke to rake across the top three strings to play the next three notes. </p> <p> The form ends with another upstroke. I then slide up to 10th position and reverse the process, beginning with a down-stroke and then using a single upstroke to rake across the top three strings, moving from high to low. <strong>FIGURE 7</strong> offers an example of applying this approach to the chord progression Em7 Am9 F#m7b5 Gmaj7.</p> <p> This is the last installment of Wild Stringdom for now. I hope these columns have been useful to you and have served to broaden your knowledge of the guitar while building up your chops. Thanks for reading, and I’ll see you out on the road!</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3250126572001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="365" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3250126572001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-30%20at%2010.38.33%20AM.png" width="620" height="693" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-30 at 10.38.33 AM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-30%20at%2010.39.19%20AM.png" width="620" height="339" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-30 at 10.39.19 AM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-combining-triad-arpeggios-form-polytonal-chordal-allusions#comments April 2014 Dream Theater John Petrucci Wild Stringdom Blogs News Lessons Magazine Fri, 18 Jul 2014 18:25:55 +0000 John Petrucci http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20542 Full Shred with Marty Friedman: Using Various Articulation Techniques to Expressively Interpret a Melody — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/full-shred-marty-friedman-using-various-articulation-techniques-expressively-interpret-melody-video <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the September 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-september-2014-the-black-keys/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=SeptemberVideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>An essential element of guitar soloing, one that to me separates the grownups from the kids, is the player’s ability to interpret single-note melodies in a musical way, with emotion and expression. </p> <p>There are countless ways in which one could play a note or series of notes on the guitar, and if you do not focus on being in control of how each note sounds, you’re wasting an opportunity for expression, via articulation, which is the one of the most important tools that is available to you as a soloist. </p> <p>The little details in the manner by which you choose to play each note in a melody is what will give you the opportunity to sound different than any other guitar player and develop a unique sound and musical “voice.” </p> <p>Using articulation as an expressive element is the one thing I concentrate on the most when playing live or recording, simply because there are so many options. The way in which you ultimately interpret a melody is the way you reveal your musical personality, which, to me, is the whole point in making music in the first place! </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3676486982001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3676486982001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/marty-friedman">Marty Friedman</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/full-shred-marty-friedman-using-various-articulation-techniques-expressively-interpret-melody-video#comments Full Shred Marty Friedman September 2014 Artist Lessons Videos News Lessons Magazine Wed, 16 Jul 2014 09:06:22 +0000 Marty Friedman http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21798 Full Shred with Marty Friedman: Finding Your Path to Musical Individuality — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/full-shred-marty-friedman-finding-your-path-musical-individuality-video <!--paging_filter--><p>When it comes to evaluating a musician, individuality is the characteristic that I hold in highest regard. We all have our heroes and favorite players from whom we’ve learned a great deal through trying to emulate their playing styles. </p> <p>In rock, for example, most players list Jimi Hendrix, Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page as major influences, and in metal it’s not uncommon to hear the names Eddie Van Halen, Randy Rhoads, Zakk Wylde or Dimebag Darrell mentioned as primary influences. </p> <p> In that sense, many of us have learned from the same sources. The trick is to take those influences and push yourself in your own unique and distinct direction. Though it may be easier to learn other people’s solos—which is fine if that’s the goal you’re pursuing—I believe it’s much more rewarding to go out on a limb and take some musical chances, just to see what new and different sounds you can discover in the pursuit of forming a style that you can eventually call your own.</p> <p> For example, playing fast is not the be-all and end-all of anything. In fact, it’s utterly unimportant. But if you are like most guitar players, you’ll want to be able to play fast, because everyone wants to play fast. So to my mind, you might as well try to do it in a way that’s cool and different from everyone else.</p> <p> The first step to playing fast in a unique way is to find things that are easy for you to play. For this, I suggest using patterns rather than things that you hear on recordings or have found in a book or magazine. <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> is a pattern built from four notes—D Cs Bf A—that is played between the B and G strings quickly, using hammer-ons and pull-offs, and can be thought of as something one might play over an A chord.</p> <p> Notice that the order of the notes is altered slightly as the lick progresses, which gives it its “unpredictable” sound. Just the fact that this phrase is not constructed from an identifiable repeated pattern makes it appealing to me right away.</p> <p> If we use this type of idea as a jumping off point, we can move it up the fretboard and change one of the notes in the pattern. <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> is played in fifth position and can be thought of as working over a C chord, Am or even A7. The one twist I add here is to alternately change one of the notes on the B string from F to G. My penchant is to constantly change the order of the notes to create a random feeling and sound.</p> <p> In <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, I elaborate on the idea of using F to E and Df to C by playing lines based on the C Phrygian-dominant mode (C Db E F G Ab Bb). In <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>, I take a simple idea based around a B7 arpeggio (B D# F# A) and add a few passing tones to make the phrase more interesting.</p> <p> It’s fine to copy other players just to learn about the guitar and to see how things tick. Ultimately, though, what’s most important is to find your own musical identity. Hopefully, these examples will help get you on your way.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3578183555001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3578183555001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-07-14%20at%204.29.23%20PM_0.png" width="620" height="635" alt="Screen Shot 2014-07-14 at 4.29.23 PM_0.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-07-14%20at%204.29.40%20PM.png" width="620" height="150" alt="Screen Shot 2014-07-14 at 4.29.40 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/marty-friedman">Marty Friedman</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/full-shred-marty-friedman-finding-your-path-musical-individuality-video#comments Full Shred July 2014 Marty Friedman Artist Lessons Videos News Lessons Magazine Mon, 14 Jul 2014 20:34:53 +0000 Marty Friedman http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21313 Betcha Can't Play This: Luis Carlos Maldonado's Add9 Roller Coaster http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-luis-carlos-maldonados-add9-roller-coaster <!--paging_filter--><p> This is an alternate-picking run based on an add9 arpeggio shape on the top three strings that’s moved up and down the neck to four different positions and tonal centers, with a slight variation in bar 2. </p> <p>It begins in E, moves down to C with a little twist—more on that in a moment—then up to D and finally A.</p> <p> The first thing you’ll notice is that the pinkie is the lead-off finger in each bar and that a five-fret stretch is required between it and the index finger for the first two notes. [Fret-hand fingerings are indicated throughout the run.] </p> <p>Be sure to ease into these stretches and warm up with them in the upper area of the fretboard before attempting them in the lower positions.</p> <p> For bar 2, I felt it sounded more colorful and interesting to alter the basic Cadd9 arpeggio [C D E G] by incorporating the #11, or #4, F#, into it, and in so doing the notes on the B and G strings are played two frets higher than where they would be if I would have simply applied the initial add9 shape from bar 1 to this position. In bar 3, the pinkie does a quick slide up to D, and the initial cell from bar 1 is used again, only a whole step lower.</p> <p> Notice the common tones on the B and G strings in bars 2 and 3. The run concludes with a long pinkie slide up to A at the 17th fret—be careful not to overshoot it—and an Aadd9 arpeggio.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/FVUgmYFhH7Q" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-14%20at%204.32.24%20PM.png" width="620" height="238" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-14 at 4.32.24 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-luis-carlos-maldonados-add9-roller-coaster#comments Betcha Can't Play This Luis Carlos Maldonado May 2010 Videos Blogs News Lessons Magazine Fri, 11 Jul 2014 16:33:07 +0000 Luis Carlos Maldonado http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21011 Bent Out of Shape: Improve Your Fretboard Knowledge with This Arpeggio Exercise http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-improve-your-fretboard-knowledge-arpeggio-exercise <!--paging_filter--><p>In this lesson, I'm going to teach you an arpeggio exercise that will help improve your music theory and knowledge of the fretboard.</p> <p>Players often play exercises only to improve technique, but it's important to vary your exercises to focus on other important parts of guitar playing. Although this exercise is based on arpeggios, it is meant to help you visualize scales differently from the standard "three note per string" shapes. </p> <p>How can learning an arpeggio exercise help with scales? </p> <p>The answer is simple: Arpeggios are derived from scales. A big problem for guitarists is not being able to switch between the two in a musical way. When you listen to solos, particularly in rock/metal, when guitarists play arpeggios, they are usually played with a sweeping or tapping technique, playing exclusively arpeggio sequences. Then when you hear scales, it's the same problem, but usually they are being played as ascending or descending alternate-picked sequences. </p> <p>Hardly ever will you hear a player integrate the two and sound musical and melodic. It all comes back to the age-old problem of guitar players whose solos sound like a bunch of exercises stuck together. There's the metaphor about players who sound like robots. These "robot" guitar players usually have two modes of lead playing: "scale mode" and "arpeggio mode." In the following weeks, I'm going to be working on a series of lessons to help you play less like a robot. </p> <p>My exercise is very simple and based off building arpeggios from scales. A simple way to look at building arpeggios is by stacking third intervals or simply skipping notes within a scale. For example, from the A minor scale (A B C D E F G), you would make an A minor arpeggio (A C E). You skip the B and D notes to make the arpeggio. You can carry on skipping notes within the scale to make larger arpeggios until you have eventually used every note from the scale to make an A minor 13th chord (A C E G B D F).</p> <p>This exercise applies that same system to every note within the key of A minor to make seven different 13th arpeggios. From every note of the A minor scale we build a 13th arpeggio by stacking thirds and play them in order. </p> <p>When playing this exercise, don't just memorize the frets from the tab; learn each note you are playing and visualize how ascending and descending through each arpeggio relates to the key scale of A minor. The way I have arranged the notes on the fretboard is not important, and if you have a good understanding of the theory behind the exercise, you should experiment with your own fretting. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/157832888&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab_8.jpg" width="620" height="279" alt="tab_8.jpg" /></p> <p>The goal of this exercise is to help develop your fretboard knowledge of scales. For that reason, each arpeggio is built strictly using only notes from the A minor scale. Some of the arpeggios in this exercise are not "normal" 13th arpeggios, which would usually involve flattening of certain intervals. However, if you can visualize how an arpeggio is derived from a scale, you can better incorporate them into your solos without relying on arpeggio shapes, which will usually end up sounding like exercises. </p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England who now lives in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and toured Japan, the US and Canada in 2012. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-improve-your-fretboard-knowledge-arpeggio-exercise#comments Bent Out of Shape Will Wallner Blogs Lessons Tue, 08 Jul 2014 21:40:16 +0000 Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21765 Harmonic Minor and Beyond: Great Scales for Heavy Metal Guitar Playing http://www.guitarworld.com/harmonic-minor-and-beyond-great-scales-heavy-metal-guitar-playing <!--paging_filter--><p>For this column, I've responded to a great question from a reader — Zachary in Houston, Texas.</p> <p><em>"Dave: What is your favorite scale to use when playing heavy metal?"</em></p> <p>Thanks for the question! Harmonic minor is always a very cool choice and a favorite of mine. It’s great to use when you’re improvising or coming up with song ideas and lead parts. </p> <p>So many impressive players have made great use of it in their songs — guys like Uli Jon Roth, Yngwie Malmsteen, Ritchie Blackmore, Steve Vai and many others. Mozart also was a big fan.</p> <p>If you want to hear how I use it, check out my song “Devils Roadmap” below: </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/t1nDO69kLxY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>Listen to my guitar solo from 3:22 to 3:40 to hear the scale in action. It’s a fun scale; you can map out crazy three-note-per-string runs all across the fretboard.</p> <p>I also like the pentatonic scale. Pentatonic is huge in metal for a reason: It sounds good in so many situations. Zakk Wylde, Frank Marino and Dave Mustaine are amazing players who have used it to great effect over the decades.</p> <p>• <strong>Pentatonic Scale</strong> (1, b3, 4, 5, b7). For example, in the key of E, that would be E, G, A, B, D.</p> <p>My solo on “I Just Don’t Want to Say Goodbye” is a favorite of mine, and I basically stick to straight-up minor pentatonic. The solo is from 3:26 to 4:37:</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/ObL-XYTdy24" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>Even though I'm a trained musician, I'm still very much a self-taught player in my heart and mind and in the way I think and approach things. </p> <p>I use the approach of just going for it and seeing what happens when I play leads and improvise. Knowledge is great as a guide, but when I’m writing, I just go for it. Usually, my best stuff happens when I'm not over-thinking it.</p> <p>I come from the Marty Friedman school of thought when it comes to scales. Marty had a great instructional DVD out where he talked about how players can get caught up thinking that they need to know tons of scales. He goes on to say you can just make up your own scales.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/uSaTAGsIBEI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>I teach my students to think in this freethinking style. For example, take the simple pentatonic scale and improvise over a riff or chord progression and throw in any chromatic passing tones you like. Practice this approach and see what sounds cool to your ears!</p> <p>The so-called “wrong notes” people might tell you to not play are sometimes the ones that sound amazing against the riff and really make your playing stand out. Take Marty's playing on Megadeth's <em>Rust In Peace.</em> He is throwing in all kinds of exotic scales and interesting note choices all over the place. </p> <p>Below, check out some great scales to add into your arsenal when you're trying to write. I’ll put these in the key of E to keep it easy, but you can move these to any key.</p> <p>• <strong>Harmonic Minor</strong> (1, 2, b3, 4, 5 b6, 7) or (E, F#, G, A, B, C, D#). Like I said, Yngwie Malmsteen and Uli Jon Roth love this scale, but you can hear it from Michael Schenker, Ritchie Blackmore and many others.</p> <p>• <strong>Phrygian Dominant</strong> (1, b2, 3, 4, 5, b6, b7) or (E, F, G#, A, B, C, D). This scale is simply the 5th mode of the harmonic minor scale. If you listen to Iron Maiden’s “Powerslave” you can hear this scale in action: </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/0NYiOHGapRk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>Al Di Meola’s “Egyptian Danza” is another great example of this scale in action. Notice a theme? This scale gets a very Egyptian-type sound! </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/XrO29hsWgto" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>• <strong>Gypsy Scale</strong> (1, b2, 3, 4, 5, b6, 7) or (E, F, G#, A, B, C, D#). This scale is the same as Phrygian dominant except for the natural 7, which this scale has. Any time you are improvising over a chord progression that has major chords that are a half step apart, this scale (as well as the Phrygian dominant) is a good choice. The Gypsy scale is cool to use when you're going for that whole snake-charming, exotic, "magic carpet ride" sound. Blackmore captured it very well on many tunes. “Gates of Babylon” by the Ronnie James Dio-fronted Rainbow is a good example.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/qu8HiZepRWo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>• <strong>Hungarian Minor</strong> (1, 2, b3, #4, 5, b6, 7) or (E, F#, G, A#, B, C, D#). This is a cool-sounding scale. This works well over a minor (major 7) chord. The Hungarian gypsy minor and harmonic minor scales are used on Chris Broderick’s solo on Megadeth's “Head Crusher” from 2:58 to 3:24.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/XurU3TPHjzY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>• <strong>Persian</strong> (1, b2, 3, 4, b5, b6, 7) or (E, F, G#, A, Bb, C, D#). This scale is cool and has that whole dark Middle Eastern feel to it. It’s got the flat 5 or “tri-tone” in there, which is always great for metal. That’s the interval that Marilyn Manson used on “The Beautiful People” or that Black Sabbath used on one of my all-time favorite songs, “Symptom of the Universe." You can get some crazy-sounding metal riffs out of this scale. It also works well for soloing over a (maj 7 #11) chord.</p> <p>• <strong>Japanese Scale</strong> (1, b2, 4, 5, b6) or (E, F, A, B, C). Friedman, Jason Becker and so many other greats have used this one. Give it a try in your soloing. It works well in minor and major key progressions. Also, with the b2 in there, it makes for a good choice when working in a Phrygian-style situation. </p> <p>• <strong>Chinese Scale</strong> (1, 2, 3, 5, 6) or (E, F#, G#, B, C#) In the Western world, we know this scale by its other name: major pentatonic. Bands like the Allman Brothers really dig its sound and use it quite a bit, as well as bluesmen like B.B. King.</p> <p>Don’t forget the different modes of the major scale. These can be very helpful. Learn them and practice how to apply them all over your fretboard. I will put these in C to keep things easy.</p> <p>• Ionian (Major Scale) (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7) or (C, D, E, F, G, A, B)<br /> • Dorian (1, 2, b3, 4, 5, 6, b7) or (D, E, F, G, A, B, C)<br /> • Phrygian (1, b2, b3, 4, 5, b6, b7) or (E, F, G, A, B, C, D)<br /> • Lydian (1, 2, 3, #4, 5, 6, 7) or (F, G, A, B, C, D, E)<br /> • Mixolydian (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, b7) or (G, A, B, C, D, E, F)<br /> • Aeolian (Minor Scale) (1, 2, b3, 4, 5, b6, b7) or (A, B, C, D, E, F, G)<br /> • Locrian (1, b2, b3, 4, b5, b6, b7) or (B, C, D, E, F, G, A)</p> <p>Here's a cool trick someone showed me to help remember what order these modes go in: “I Don’t Punch Like Muhammad A Li.”</p> <p>I= Ionian<br /> Don’t= Dorian<br /> Punch= Phrygian<br /> Like= Lydian<br /> Muhammad= Mixolydian<br /> A= Aeolian<br /> Li= Locrian.</p> <p><em><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Reffett">Dave Reffett</a> is a Berklee College of Music graduate and has worked with some of the best players in rock and metal. He is an instructor at (and the head of) the Hard Rock and Heavy Metal department at The Real School of Music in the metro Boston area. He also is a master clinician and a highly-in-demand private guitar teacher. He teaches lessons in person and worldwide via Skype. As an artist and performer, he is working on some soon-to-be revealed high-profile projects with A-list players in rock and metal. In 2009, he formed the musical project Shredding The Envelope and released the critically acclaimed album The Call Of The Flames. Dave also is an official artist endorsee for companies like Seymour Duncan, Gibson, Eminence and Esoterik Guitars, which in 2011 released a Dave Reffett signature model guitar, the DR-1. Dave has worked in the past at Sanctuary Records and Virgin Records, where he promoting acts like the Rolling Stones, Janet Jackson, Korn and Meat Loaf.</em></p> <p><em>Dave Reffett headshot photo by Yolanda Sutherland</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/deep-purple">Deep Purple</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/metallica">Metallica</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/harmonic-minor-and-beyond-great-scales-heavy-metal-guitar-playing#comments Dave Reffett Blogs Features Lessons Thu, 03 Jul 2014 17:35:42 +0000 Dave Reffett http://www.guitarworld.com/article/12389 JamPlay with Kenny Ray: Enhancing Blues Progressions with Seventh and "Jimi Hendrix" Chords http://www.guitarworld.com/jamplay-kenny-ray-enhancing-blues-progressions-seventh-and-jimi-hendrix-chords <!--paging_filter--><p><strong><em>Kenny "Blue" Ray is a life-long blues musician who has played with greats such as Stevie Ray Vaughan. Kenny also is a <a href="http://www.jamplay.com/">JamPlay</a> instructor who teaches live and pre-recorded classes on blues guitar.</em></strong></p> <p>In this lesson, Kenny discusses 7th chords and how they can be used to enhance any blues progression. </p> <p>He also demonstrates short forms of the chords that can be used for a softer sound. While discussing the 7th chords, he also talks about some of Jimi Hendrix's favorites.</p> <p>Check out the lesson video below — complete with video. For more JamPlay lessons on GuitarWorld.com, check out Andy James' <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/jamplay-andy-james-three-pentatonic-hybrid-picked-runs-increase-speed-and-dexterity">"Three Pentatonic Hybrid-Picked Runs to Increase Speed and Dexterity"</a> and Glen Drover's <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/jamplay-glen-drover-mysterious-harmonic-minor-walk-down-video">Mysterious Harmonic Minor Walk Down.</a></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3654019848001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3654019848001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /></p> <p><strong>PART 1</strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-07-01%20at%204.39.28%20PM.png" width="620" height="762" alt="Screen Shot 2014-07-01 at 4.39.28 PM.png" /></p> <p><strong>PART 2</strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-07-01%20at%204.39.40%20PM.png" width="620" height="699" alt="Screen Shot 2014-07-01 at 4.39.40 PM.png" /></p> <p><strong>PART 3</strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-07-01%20at%204.40.06%20PM.png" width="620" height="791" alt="Screen Shot 2014-07-01 at 4.40.06 PM.png" /></p> <p><strong>PART 4</strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-07-01%20at%204.40.19%20PM.png" width="620" height="348" alt="Screen Shot 2014-07-01 at 4.40.19 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jamplay-kenny-ray-enhancing-blues-progressions-seventh-and-jimi-hendrix-chords#comments JamPlay Kenny Ray Blogs News Lessons Tue, 01 Jul 2014 20:38:50 +0000 Kenny Ray http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21728 JamPlay with Glen Drover: Mysterious Harmonic Minor Walk Down — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/jamplay-glen-drover-mysterious-harmonic-minor-walk-down-video <!--paging_filter--><p><strong><em>Glen Drover is best known as the former guitarist for Megadeth and is now an instructor on <a href="http://www.jamplay.com/">JamPlay</a>. He teaches live and pre-recorded lessons.</em></strong></p> <p>In this lesson, Drover teaches a "mysterious" harmonic minor walk down in the key of E. </p> <p>This lick can be played by using alternate picking, or alternatively as a blazing-fast legato run.</p> <p>Check out the lesson video below — complete with video. For another JamPlay lesson on GuitarWorld.com, check out Andy James' <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/jamplay-andy-james-three-pentatonic-hybrid-picked-runs-increase-speed-and-dexterity">"Three Pentatonic Hybrid-Picked Runs to Increase Speed and Dexterity."</a></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3653966944001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3653966944001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-07-01%20at%203.52.35%20PM.png" width="620" height="633" alt="Screen Shot 2014-07-01 at 3.52.35 PM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-07-01%20at%203.52.48%20PM.png" width="620" height="452" alt="Screen Shot 2014-07-01 at 3.52.48 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jamplay-glen-drover-mysterious-harmonic-minor-walk-down-video#comments Glen Drover JamPlay Videos Blogs News Lessons Tue, 01 Jul 2014 20:02:11 +0000 Glen Drover http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21726