Lessons http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/8/0 en Secrets of Shred with Sammy Boller: Modern Shred Arpeggios — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/secrets-shred-sammy-boller-modern-shred-arpeggios-video <!--paging_filter--><p>In this lesson, I’ll be demonstrating a modern way of playing arpeggios by combining string skipping and tapping. </p> <p>I’ll be showing you three different arpeggio shapes. At the end of the lesson, I’ll give you an example of how you can string them together into a ripping fast progression.</p> <p> Let’s start with <strong>EXAMPLE 1</strong>. This example starts with an Fmaj7 arpeggio with the root of the chord on the A string. I then take this shape and move it to the E string to play a Cmaj7 arpeggio. </p> <p>What I love about this approach is that nearly every arpeggio shape is movable between the A and E strings. For all the examples in this lesson, I play two notes with my left hand and one note with my right hand on every string in the arpeggio.</p> <p> <strong>EXAMPLE 2</strong> is the same approach but this time with Min7 arpeggios. I start with a Dm7 on the A string then move it over to the E string to play an Amin7 arpeggio. Notice I’m using the same fingering between arpeggios.</p> <p> Moving on to <strong>EXAMPLE 3,</strong> I take this approach one step further by playing Dim7 arpeggios. This time, I play Edim7 and Bdim7, respectively. This is probably the trickiest shape to get down in this lesson, but it is also the most useful. Since it is a diminished chord, it can be moved up and down the neck by three frets to achieve the next inversion of the chord. </p> <p><strong>NOTE:</strong> All diminished arpeggio shapes can be moved up and down by three frets, regardless of the technique you’re using: sweep picking, tapping, string skipping, etc. </p> <p> For our final example, <strong>EXAMPLE 4</strong> takes these shapes and strings them together into a progression. The progression is Dm7-C#maj7-G#maj7-Edim7. When I’m practicing something like this, I try to focus on the transitions between each chord. I find the more I focus on the transitions, the faster I get the progression down.</p> <p> These modern shred patterns are my favorite way of playing arpeggios because they have a completely different sound than the standard sweep picking shapes everybody plays. They are also closely related to the most common pentatonic and major scale shapes, so once you get these down, try linking them in with some of your favorite scales. I think you’ll find they are easy to grab all around the neck.</p> <p>And remember there are only two types of breakfast cereals for guitar players: BLUESBERRY CRUNCH and ARPEGGI-O’s. Cheers!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/WY4GZYbkBjo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-04-17%20at%201.16.19%20PM.png" width="620" height="820" alt="Screen Shot 2015-04-17 at 1.16.19 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-04-17%20at%201.16.36%20PM.png" width="620" height="548" alt="Screen Shot 2015-04-17 at 1.16.36 PM.png" /></p> <p><em>Sammy Boller is the guitarist for the Detroit rock band <a href="https://www.facebook.com/citizenzero">Citizen Zero</a>. They’re touring and recording their first full-length album with Al Sutton and Marlon Young (Kid Rock, Bob Seger, Uncle Kracker). In 2012, Boller was selected by Joe Satriani as a winner of Guitar Center’s Master Satriani competition. He studied music at the University of Michigan. For more about Boller, or to ask him a question, write to him at info@sammyboller.com or follow him on <a href="https://twitter.com/sammyboller">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/secrets-shred-sammy-boller-modern-shred-arpeggios-video#comments Sammy Boller Secrets of Shred Videos Blogs News Lessons Fri, 17 Apr 2015 18:06:56 +0000 Sammy Boller http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23950 Betcha Can't Play This: Doug Aldrich's Three-Octave Pentatonic Ascent http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-doug-aldrichs-three-octave-pentatonic-ascent <!--paging_filter--><p>This is a triplet-based run in A minor that starts out in the low register and moves up and across the fretboard, spanning three octaves before settling into a single position and moving back across the strings. </p> <p> I’m using hammer-ons and pull-offs in combination with picking to achieve a fast stream of notes that "pops" and flows. Each pair of triplets in bar 1 is played within a compact four-note shape that I fret with my index and ring fingers. </p> <p> When I get to the top two strings in bar 2, I continue the same phrasing approach and bring the pinkie into play to incorporate wide intervals and big fret-hand stretches and use quick position shifts to ascend the neck. On beat three of bar 2 I melodically outline a Gadd2 chord [G A B D], which creates a nice sense of harmonic movement in an otherwise A minor pentatonic [A C D E G] tonality.</p> <p> Once I get to the high A note at the 17th fret at the end of bar 2, I stay in the 14th-position A minor pentatonic box pattern for the remainder of the lick and work my way back over to the low E string, using double pull-offs in conjunction with chromatic passing tones at the 16th fret on the top two strings. </p> <p>At the end of bar 3, I play a Jeff Beck–inspired move, picking the C note at the 17th fret on the G string followed by a big, one-and-one-half-step "over-bend" up to that same pitch from A, three frets lower, pulling the string downward with my index finger. </p> <p>I also do a little bit of string skipping to disguise the sound of the scale pattern, and I finish the lick by adding the ninth, B, to the scale to suggest an A natural minor [A B C D E F G] sound. As I did with the bend, I add vibrato to the final note by pulling the string down, which is the only way to bend the low E string.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/3O1VfP5cmMM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/doug.jpg" width="620" height="348" alt="doug.jpg" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-doug-aldrichs-three-octave-pentatonic-ascent#comments Betcha Can't Play This Doug Aldrich November 2008 Videos News Lessons Magazine Thu, 16 Apr 2015 21:53:59 +0000 Doug Aldrich http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21256 LessonFace with John Heussenstamm: Introduction to Jazz Guitar http://www.guitarworld.com/lessonface-john-heussenstamm-introduction-jazz-guitar <!--paging_filter--><p><strong>This video and article offer introductory jazz guitar concepts from guitarist and music educator John Heussenstamm. Author and co-author of multiple widely distributed books and videos from major music education publishers, and recipient of more than 10 million views on YouTube, Heussenstamm now can be reached for live online lessons via <a href="http://lessonface.go2cloud.org/SFS">Lessonface.</a></strong></p> <p>How many pianos are there in the world? Millions, right? </p> <p>They all have the same keyboard layout of the C major or A minor scale on the white keys. </p> <p>It must be important or such an instrument wouldn't exist. The jazz guitarist should focus on that and make a thorough study of the C major diatonic scale in all of its positions and discover its significance. </p> <p>In my experience as a teacher, usually the up-and-coming player neglects this area because they feel it's boring and doesn't sound like the wild jazz they're so anxious to hear coming out of their instrument. </p> <p>Since a large part of all the music in the world is based on this sound, every aspect of melody and harmony you learn from your diatonic study can be applied to the more dissonant and outside-the-box sounds. The scales that are more difficult to command are easier to use once you master the more fundamental harmonies.</p> <p>In the three examples below, I've given a different fingering and position for each one with a corresponding melody. The reason it's a good idea to learn more than one position or fingering is because of our physical limitations. </p> <p>Melodies that are too difficult to play in one area might be possible or easier to play in another. My desire as a teacher is not to show what to play but how to go about playing what YOU could play if you were familiar with different positions. MAKE UP YOUR OWN MELODIES ONCE YOU KNOW WHERE THE NOTES ARE!</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Diagram1.jpg" width="620" height="430" alt="Diagram1.jpg" /> </p> <p>Octaves are a popular sound for the jazz guitar. One should listen to Wes Montgomery and George Benson. Study their use of octaves and hear how it really highlights their style and sound.</p> <p>The next line is an exercise I use to help familiarize students with the sound and technique required to play octaves.</p> <p>Octaves based on the E and A strings are two frets apart. Octaves based on the D and G string are three frets apart. The theory of the line is going up in 4ths. A 4th is the interval between all the notes climbing in the music line. Example A B C D = 1 2 3 4. 1 to 4 would be called a 4th. </p> <p>To play octaves on the guitar we have to mute or deaden the strings our fingers aren't pressing. To do that lightly touch the string next to the one you're pressing by leaning into it with that finger. We can also pinch or pluck the octave strings with the thumb and fingers of the right hand. It really helps to have a teacher show you this.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Diagram2.jpg" width="620" height="176" alt="Diagram2.jpg" /> </p> <p>The use of octaves is simply based on fattening or beefing up the sound of each note in a melody. In the following example, I wrote a simple blues melody with bass notes. I then added the higher octave note. We can do this with any melody, but really super-fast jazz lines are difficult or perhaps impossible to play with octaves. There might be someone like Scotty Anderson who can do it.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Diagram3.jpg" width="620" height="140" alt="Diagram3.jpg" /></p> <p>Unlike the trumpet or saxophone, that can only play one note at a time, the guitar can play intervals and chords with more than one note sustained and sounded out simultaneously. Some of my favorite sounds in all of music are jazz chords on the guitar. I particularly like the use of the thumb and fingers of the right hand plucking the strings. You can get piano and harp-like results from a relatively small instrument. George Van Eps used to call his guitar a lap piano.</p> <p>* Notice that all the voicings of the next example consist of four notes designed to be played by the thumb, first, second and third fingers of the right hand.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Diagram4.jpg" width="620" height="150" alt="Diagram4.jpg" /></p> <p>All the theories to develop these kind of results are found in blues and jazz. As I said before and so often do, study music theory and harmony from the perspective that a keyboard offers then organize and label everything that universal way. Then go about breaking all the rules or making up your own rules to come up with your own sound. But first learn the fundamentals!</p> <p>Having several chords cascading down is a wonderful effect in music.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Diagram5.jpg" width="620" height="140" alt="Diagram5.jpg" /> </p> <p>Most of the chords in this upper example relate directly to the key of C. Whenever there is a flat or sharp used you could say you've left the key or you're hearing accidentals. To get smooth transitions back and forth or in and out of keys is a main feature in jazz and it is the responsibility of the jazz musician to learn how to resolve his or her musical ideas smoothly and gracefully.</p> <p>This final example of jazz guitar in this brief lesson touches upon chord melody; having chords and melody notes being played at the same time. You can accompany your own melodies with chords as a soloist. This gives you the ability to work on your own in different venues and events without the need of any other musician backing you up; a triumph for the little guitar man.</p> <p>The sample melody harmonized.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Diagram6.jpg" width="620" height="160" alt="Diagram6.jpg" /></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/I_KQsqCqZk4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>John Heussenstamm offers live online lessons and classes on <a href="http://lessonface.go2cloud.org/SFS">Lessonface.com. Learn more.</a></em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/lessonface-john-heussenstamm-introduction-jazz-guitar#comments John Heussenstamm LessonFace Videos Blogs Lessons Wed, 15 Apr 2015 17:03:48 +0000 John Heussenstamm http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23933 Beyond the Fretboard: Knowing "a Ton of Scales" Made Simple, Part 1 http://www.guitarworld.com/beyond-fretboard-knowing-ton-scales-made-simple-part-1 <!--paging_filter--><p>We all know the true measure of an accomplished guitarist is not dependent upon how many scales he or she can blaze through.</p> <p>Instead, it's much more enjoyable to hear a player who has great command and control over just one or two scales. Many of the greats did not possess encyclopedic knowledge of music theory, and it didn't seem to hinder their progress or creativity. </p> <p>Jimi Hendrix might not have been aware of the Lydian dominant scale—but does that diminish his ability? I think we all know the answer to that question. The man internalized the blues and pentatonic scales to the point where every note he played sounded so tasteful, deliberate and powerful.</p> <p>With all of that being said, I do want to talk about how knowing many scales can be a much less daunting proposition than you might think. The key is in understanding how various concepts in music theory are connected to each other. The more you go down this path, the more you'll realize no piece of music theory truly functions in isolation. And it is these connections that will make the learning of various scales relatively painless.</p> <p>Let's start with the concept of modes. Without getting stuck in the music theory weeds, modes are essentially scales. You can play them over an appropriate chord progression and they will help guide you through your improvisations. What makes modes unique is their relationship with what is sometimes referred to as a parent scale.</p> <p>The best example of this is the major scale. You might've heard the saying that the major scale is the "mother of all scales." This doesn't mean it's the coolest scale, but it is an accurate description of its role in modal structure and music theory as a whole. The role is that of a parental figure.</p> <p>Some of you may know that all music intervals are derived from the clean and pristine numbering system of the major scale. It's a seven-note scale that is simply numbered 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. The eighth note is called the octave, which is always the same note as the root, just higher in pitch. Every other scale that exists will ultimately be compared back to the major scale.</p> <p>For example, the melodic minor scale is almost identical to the major scale, except for the third note in its sequence. Because this third note deviates from our reference point (the major scale), we can't simply label it as "3." Instead, we refer to it as a flat 3rd (or minor 3rd) to indicate that it is a half step lower in pitch than the major scale's third note. This is how the entire intervallic system is constructed, all relating back to the major scale. This example is illustrated in the diagrams below.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/1_4.png" width="620" height="244" alt="1_4.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/2_2.png" width="620" height="246" alt="2_2.png" /></p> <p>Getting back to modes, the major scale also acts as a parental figure in modal construction. Let's say we're playing the major scale in the key of C. The seven notes we'll play will be C, D, E, F, G, A, B. Remember, this is based on "C" being the root note, or the tonal center. It is the focal point of resolution. What if we decided to use a different note as the tonal center while maintaining the same family of seven notes? This is the crucial component to understanding the nature of modes.</p> <p>Let's now use "A" as the root and see what happens. Those same seven notes that now orbit around the tonal center of "A" become the minor scale (also known as the Aeolian mode or natural minor). So you see, the minor scale is not considered a parent scale in this context, which might surprise some of you.</p> <p>In today's climate, we're all used to the major, minor and pentatonic scales being front and center in our musical landscape. But the natural minor and pentatonic scales play a somewhat subordinate role and can be easily derived simply from the major scale. Think about it this way: The natural minor scale can always be found within a major scale by shifting the tonal center to the sixth note in the major scale's sequence. </p> <p>And the minor pentatonic scale is simply a shortened version of the natural minor scale (five notes instead of the full seven). Likewise, the major pentatonic is basically the major scale—minus two notes. This eases the burden of having to memorize four individual scales and instead helps us to use a more cohesive and unified approach. </p> <p>Take a look at how this concept might look in the diagrams below.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202013-07-19%20at%2010.27.12%20AM.png" width="620" height="1033" alt="Screen Shot 2013-07-19 at 10.27.12 AM.png" /></p> <p>In my next column, we'll use this approach to take on what would have been an overwhelming task, but now might seem more manageable: the introduction to more than 20 different scales. To be continued ...</p> <p><em>Chris Breen is a New Jersey-based guitarist with 14 years of experience under his belt. He, along with his brother Jon (on drums) started the two-piece metal project known as <a href="http://www.Facebook.com/scarsicBand">SCARSIC</a> in 2011. Due to a lack of members, Chris tracked guitars, bass and vocals for their self titled four-song demo (available on iTunes, Spotify and Rhapsody). They have recently been joined by bassist Bill Loucas and are writing new material. Chris also is part of an all-acoustic side project known as <a href="http://www.Reverbnation.com/EyesTurnStone">Eyes Turn Stone</a>. Chris teaches guitar lessons as well (in person or via Skype). If you're interested in taking lessons with Chris, visit <a href="http://www.BreenMusicLessons.com">BreenMusicLessons.com</a> for more info.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/beyond-fretboard-knowing-ton-scales-made-simple-part-1#comments Beyond the Fretboard Chris Breen Blogs Lessons Thu, 09 Apr 2015 17:21:50 +0000 Chris Breen http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18853 Hole Notes: The Acoustic Guitar Artistry of The Beatles' George Harrison http://www.guitarworld.com/hole-notes-acoustic-artistry-beatles-george-harrison <!--paging_filter--><p>Of the four Beatles, George Harrison brought to the group an assortment of electric and acoustic guitar approaches, flavors influenced by everyone from Chet Atkins and Carl Perkins to the Byrds and Bob Dylan. </p> <p>Harrison’s pioneering use of the Rickenbacker 360/12 electric 12-string on songs like “A Hard Day’s Night” and “Ticket to Ride” added another dimension to the sound of Beatles music and left an imprint on Sixties-era rock: soon after, the Byrds, Beach Boys and Rolling Stones began to use 12-string guitars. </p> <p>In the mid-Sixties, influenced by Indian culture and Hinduism, Harrison introduced the sitar and exotic scales into the Beatles’ catalog on songs like “Norwegian Wood” and “Within You Without You.” In essence, he played a huge role in stylizing the Beatles’ music. </p> <p>But Harrison also contributed a wealth of guitar-centric hits to the band’s repertoire, many of which center around an acoustic guitar (his Gibson J-200). In this lesson, we’ll look at musical examples inspired by Harrison-penned Beatles classics like “Here Comes the Sun,” “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” and “Something.” </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/holenotes1010_1.jpg" /></p> <p>“While My Guitar Gently Weeps” revolves around strummed versions of the chords in <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>. Much of this song’s emotional power stems from its mostly chromatic (notes one half step apart, the distance of one fret) descending A–G–F#–F bass line. The song also features a famous, inspired solo by Eric Clapton. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/holenotes1010_2.jpg" /></p> <p>Chromatic movement is a characteristic common to many of Harrison’s popular Beatles tracks, among them, “Something,” which informs <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>. While the original Abbey Road version is played on electric guitars (in the key of C), the original demo (key of A) on <em>The Beatles: Anthology 3</em> is a solo performance by Harrison, who plays a hollowbody electric, warranting its relevance here. Use the picking pattern in bar 1 for the A, Amaj7 and A7 chords, and note the descending chromatic line on the G string. Similar chromaticism is also encountered in a later F#m–F#m(maj7)–F#m7 change. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/holenotes1010_3.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/holenotes1010_4.jpg" /></p> <p>Hands down, the most popular acoustic guitar “picking” riff in the Beatles oeuvre is the passage that opens Harrison’s “Here Comes the Sun,” which gets its sparkling quality from the fact that it is capoed at the seventh fret. <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> is a passage inspired by the song’s main riff, containing mostly D, A7 and G chords (use alternate picking throughout, beginning with a downstroke). <strong>FIGURE 4</strong> features a variation on the chords used in the song’s bridge.</p> <p><strong>Part 1</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1783830205001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1783830205001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p> <strong>Part 2</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1783799364001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1783799364001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p> <strong>Part 3</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1783804763001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1783804763001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/george-harrison">George Harrison</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/beatles">The Beatles</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/hole-notes-acoustic-artistry-beatles-george-harrison#comments George Harrison Hole Notes Musicians Institute October 2012 The Beatles 2012 Videos Musicians Institute Video Lessons News Lessons Magazine Thu, 09 Apr 2015 12:05:26 +0000 Dale Turner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/16555 Hole Notes: A Look at the Acoustic Guitar Artistry of Yes Guitarist Steve Howe — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/hole-notes-look-acoustic-techniques-steve-howe <!--paging_filter--><p>While Steve Howe is perhaps best known for his electric and acoustic contributions to the progressive rock band Yes, the über-eclectic axman has also played key roles in bands like Asia and GTR and released well over a dozen solo albums.</p> <p>When Howe joined Yes in 1970, his classical influences, jazz-tinged electric guitar lines and general “experimental” musical nature had a profound impact on the band’s art-rock sound, resulting in a string of classic Seventies-era progressive rock records like <em>The Yes Album, Fragile</em> and <em>Close to the Edge.</em> </p> <p> Furthermore, live Yes photos from this era show Howe wielding “unlikely” rock instruments, including a Gibson ES-175 electric and innumerable steel-, nylon- and 12-string acoustics. In doing so, he made many guitarists reconsider their own perceptions of what makes an “acceptable” rock ax.</p> <p> While Yes has endured many lineup changes since then, the band—with Howe in the fold—is still active today and released their latest album, <em>Heaven &amp; Earth</em> in 2014.</p> <p> Let’s take a closer look at Howe’s acoustic output with this timeless prog act. Howe uses a pick-and-fingers (“hybrid- picking”) technique on “Clap” (<em>The Yes Album,</em> 1970), an acoustic solo piece that informs <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>. </p> <p> Grip your pick between your thumb and index finger and pluck with your middle (m) and ring (a) fingers. Get the D/A pattern together first—downstroke the lowest note, pluck the highest with your ring finger (a) and then downstroke the chord’s middle notes—and pick/pluck the remaining chords in a similar manner. This figure’s last four bars feature E7 chord fragments shifted up the neck, played with a “banjo-rolling” technique and punctuated with a strummed E6/9 chord.</p> <p> Howe’s intro to “Roundabout” (<em>Fragile,</em> 1971), not unlike <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, is also performed using hybrid picking and is played in “free time” (with no discernible pulse) for expressive effect. After sounding the signature harmonics, “pre-fret” the third, fifth and seventh frets along the high E string, and pull off.</p> <p> For Am, G and D/F#, pick the bass notes and pluck the B and G strings with your ring and middle fingers, respectively. Now let’s put the pick aside and focus on Howe’s fingerstyle chops. “Mood for a Day” (<em>Fragile</em>, 1971) is a flamenco-influenced (with Celtic overtones) nylon-string solo piece featuring counterpoint moves—upper-register scalar lines played over shifting bass notes—like those in <strong>FIGURE 3a</strong>. </p> <p> Pluck each bass note with your thumb (p), using your middle and index fingers to sound notes on the top three strings. <strong>FIGURE 3b</strong> is reminiscent of another recurring theme in the piece and requires all four fret-hand fingers for high-E string pull- offs while low open strings sound beneath.</p> <p> Our final examples are inspired by the song “Masquerade” (<em>Union</em>, 1991) and fall in open position, decorating a D chord. </p> <p> Fret Dsus2 in <strong>FIGURE 4a</strong> with your index and middle fingers on the G and B strings, respectively; this frees up your other fingers to add hammer-on/ pull-off ornaments and comfortably grab later chords. <strong>FIGURE 4b</strong> embellishes the open D with sixths intervals (two notes, six scale steps apart), played with hammer-ons and pull-offs and plucked with the index (i) and ring (a) fingers, throughout.</p> <p><strong>Part 1</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1310987072001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1310987072001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <strong>Part 2</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1310916229001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1310916229001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <strong>Part 3</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1310916189001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1310916189001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-04-08%20at%203.50.42%20PM.png" width="620" height="819" alt="Screen Shot 2015-04-08 at 3.50.42 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/steve-howe">Steve Howe</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/yes">Yes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/hole-notes-look-acoustic-techniques-steve-howe#comments Hole Notes January January 2012 Musicians Institute Steve Howe Yes 2012 Videos Musicians Institute Video Lessons News Lessons Magazine Wed, 08 Apr 2015 20:04:10 +0000 Dale Turner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/13820 Yes Guitarist Steve Howe Shows You How to Play "Starship Trooper," "Siberian Khatru" and "Mood for a Day" — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/exclusive-steve-howe-video-lesson <!--paging_filter--><p>In the following video, legendary Yes guitarist Steve Howe shows you how to play the key riffs to several Yes classics, including "Starship Trooper," "Siberian Khatru" and "Mood for a Day."</p> <p>Howe recently stopped by <em>Guitar World</em> HQ to answer readers' questions. </p> <p>To find out more about his vintage guitar collection, the first song he learned to play and much more, head <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-steve-howe-yes-and-asia-answers-guitar-world-readers-questions">here</a>.</p> <p>Yes released their latest studio album, <em>Heaven &amp; Earth</em>, in 2014. </p> <p>Enjoy!</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1729299002001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1729299002001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/steve-howe">Steve Howe</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/yes">Yes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/exclusive-steve-howe-video-lesson#comments Steve Howe Yes Artist Lessons Videos News Lessons Magazine Wed, 08 Apr 2015 14:49:30 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/3225 In Deep with Andy Aledort: Riffs and Licks That Define Rock and Roll Guitar, from Chuck Berry to Joan Jett — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-riffs-and-licks-define-rock-and-roll-guitar-chuck-berry-joan-jett-video <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the May 2015 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-15-joan-jett?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=May2015VideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>When Joan Jett recorded the title track to <em>I Love Rock ’N’ Roll,</em> which was a cover version of a song originally released in 1975 by the British band the Arrows, little did she know that this pagan battle cry would in time earn her status as one of rock’s most iconic figures. </p> <p>Upon its release in 1982, the song stayed at Number One on the Top 100 chart for seven weeks and has since been named Billboard’s 56th greatest rock song of all time. </p> <p>Now, more than three decades later, Joan is still rockin’ hard, and rock and roll is still alive and well. In this extended edition of In Deep, we’ll examine the roots of true rock and roll guitar and its essential, foundational elements that were chiseled into stone by the style’s founding father—the immortal Chuck Berry—the man whose playing would inspire and inform many of the world’s greatest rock bands, from the Beatles and the Rolling Stones to AC/DC.</p> <p> One of the small handful of records regarded as the “first” rock and roll song is “Rocket 88,” recorded in March 1951 by Jackie Brenston and his Delta Cats. Brenston was actually a horn player and singer in guitarist/keyboardist Ike Turner’s band, the Kings of Rhythm, and he is credited with writing “Rocket 88.” </p> <p>roduced by Sam Phillips in Memphis and released on the Chess label, “Rocket 88” went straight to Number One and it’s incredible success enabled Phillips to launch Sun Records. </p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-15-joan-jett?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=May2015VideosPage">For the rest of this column, including the tabs, check out the May 2015 issue of Guitar World.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/LrAI-ikHZUk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/chuck-berry">Chuck Berry</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joan-jett">Joan Jett</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-riffs-and-licks-define-rock-and-roll-guitar-chuck-berry-joan-jett-video#comments Andy Aledort Chuck Berry In Deep Joan Jett May 2015 Videos News Lessons Magazine Wed, 08 Apr 2015 14:44:27 +0000 Andy Aledort http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23802 How to Play Faster Scales, Presented by Guitar Salon International — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-how-play-faster-scales-presented-guitar-salon-international <!--paging_filter--><p>Think you’re fast? </p> <p>I dare you to keep up with monster player Adam del Monte.</p> <p>Here this flamenco master teaches you how to play even faster, addressing right-hand techniques and practice elements.</p> <p>As one of the leading flamenco and classical guitarists/composers of his generation, del Monte has made it his mission to fully express himself in these two genres, transcending labels and convention.</p> <p>Find out more about Adam and his music at <a href="http://www.adamdelmonte.com">adamdelmonte.com.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/9ls9avz03oA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>Guitar Salon International is the world’s largest dealer of fine classical and flamenco guitars since 1983, and the premier online community and resource for guitar-related discussion, entertainment and education. </p> <p>The GSI website offers hundreds of performance videos, thousands of guitar listings in both an active webstore and our museum archive, a news blog and countless reference resources. </p> <p>Find out more at <a href="http://www.guitarsalon.com/">guitarsalon.com.</a> </p> http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-how-play-faster-scales-presented-guitar-salon-international#comments Acoustic Nation Adam del Monte Guitar Salon International Lessons Videos Blogs Videos News Lessons Wed, 08 Apr 2015 11:38:03 +0000 Acoustic Nation http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23887 Metal for Life with Metal Mike: High-Pitched Natural Harmonics — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-high-pitched-natural-harmonics <!--paging_filter--><p>In this month’s column, I’d like to demonstrate several licks that utilize natural harmonics. </p> <p>A natural harmonic (N.H.) is sounded by picking an open string while lightly touching it with a fret-hand finger directly above a given fret. </p> <p>The natural harmonics that are easiest to produce and are most commonly used are those found directly above the 12th, seventh and fifth frets.</p> <p>When executed properly, a natural harmonic should have a bell-like chime that rings clearly and sustains. Let’s begin by lightly resting the ring finger across all six strings directly above the 12th fret and picking each string individually, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 1.</strong></p> <p>I then proceed to do the same thing at the seventh and fifth frets. (Remember, the finger must touch the string directly above the fret.) Some of my favorite natural harmonics—the ones I use most often to create cool-sounding licks—are found on the G string between the second and third frets. </p> <p> As shown in <strong>FIGURE 2,</strong> I rest my ring finger directly above the third fret to sound a high D natural harmonic and move back slightly to a point just ahead of the midpoint between the second and third frets (indicated as 2.6 in the tab) to sound a high F natural harmonic. I then move back a hair more to just behind the midpoint (indicated as 2.4) to sound a G, four octaves higher than the pitch of the open string. I then play the natural harmonic directly above the second fret, which is a very high A. These higher, “stratospheric” natural harmonics are not as loud as those at the 12th, seventh and fifth frets and are more challenging to sound clearly. You can help bring them out by using your guitar’s bridge pickup and lots of gain.</p> <p>For each of these harmonics, I use the whammy bar to add vibrato, which also helps the note to sustain a little longer. I can then depress the bar to get the harmonic to quickly drop, or “dive,” in pitch.</p> <p>A very cool natural-harmonic technique—one that players like Dimebag Darrell, Joe Satriani and Steve Vai have gotten a lot of mileage out of—is to pull off to the open G string while simultaneously dropping the whammy bar, and then lightly touch the string at different points while raising the bar to get a great ascending-harmonic sound.</p> <p>In <strong>FIGURE 3,</strong> I quickly pull off with the index finger at the second fret of the G string to get the string vibrating, dropping the whammy bar simultaneously, after which I lightly touch the string directly above the third fret to sound the natural harmonic located there. This is often referred to as a “touch harmonic” and is indicated by the abbreviation “T.H.” </p> <p>In <strong>FIGURES 4 and 5,</strong> I move slightly behind the third fret (2.6) and to the second fret to sound even higher, screaming natural harmonics.</p> <p>Another great technique is to play the high G harmonic located above the fifth fret of the G string along with the high F# harmonic located above the seventh fret of the B string, as I do in <strong>FIGURE 6.</strong> Notice I again use the whammy bar to shake or lower and raise the pitch of the harmonics.</p> <p>In <strong>FIGURE 7,</strong> I repeatedly pull off to the open G string from different points along the fretboard so I can add natural harmonics at the 12th, ninth, seventh, fifth and fourth frets, as well as just behind the third fret, adding two quick whammy-bar scoops as each harmonic sounds. </p> <p>Lastly, in <strong>FIGURE 8</strong>, I use the same technique to get the G string ringing but quickly “flick” the whammy bar to get a fast warble on each harmonic, followed by a whammy-bar dive.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/DGM5_i7kwd8?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-04-07%20at%203.05.17%20PM.png" width="620" height="747" alt="Screen Shot 2015-04-07 at 3.05.17 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-high-pitched-natural-harmonics#comments 2011 December December 2011 Metal For Life Metal Mike Videos News Lessons Magazine Tue, 07 Apr 2015 19:15:02 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak http://www.guitarworld.com/article/13151 What in the World: Not (Just) Another "Flight of the Bumblebee" Lesson http://www.guitarworld.com/what-world-not-just-another-flight-bumblebee-lesson <!--paging_filter--><p>"Flight of the Bumblebee" has become a popular piece to play to show off technical prowess on the guitar. </p> <p>Originally written for violin, there are many different versions you will find for guitar. There is no, single, master version for guitar, since it wasn't written for the instrument. Learning a few different versions would be a good idea. The different approaches will present varying techniques and interpretations.</p> <p>Most, if not all, of the videos you see of "Flight of the Bumblebee" are performed at lightning-fast speeds. This was the intention of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, the composer of "Flight of the Bumblebee." He wanted to write a piece of music that painted a musical picture of a bee buzzing around, which he very successfully accomplished. </p> <p>That said, if you cannot play the piece at a fast tempo at this time, you shouldn't be discouraged. Even if you're never able to reach your goal, you will have at least gained something from trying and maybe discovered something new in the process. It’s completely up to you to choose to be discouraged or inspired when trying to accomplish something. </p> <p>Don’t compare your progress to someone else’s; that's the surest way to fail. I used to compare myself to my peers and it did nothing for me, except wasted a lot of mental energy when I should have just relaxed and gone with the process of progress. Everyone develops and learns at different rates. If you see something you think at the time is unattainable, don’t be discouraged. Be inspired and know that with enough hard work, you will be able to do it or better one day. There's no reason to not be inspired 100 percent of the time!</p> <p>The best way to approach learning how to play "Flight of the Bumblebee" is to work on memorizing bits of it at a time. A lot of the piece is essentially a main theme with leadups and outs of that theme, chromatically. Work on the main theme separately as a daily exercise, gradually increasing the tempo.</p> <p>Here's an instance of the main theme:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Riff-00003.jpg" width="620" height="205" alt="Riff-00003.jpg" /> </p> <p>The best fingering for this would be: 4-3-2-1 1-4-3-2 4-3-2-1 1-2-3-4. Compositionally, this is a cool call-and-response phrase.</p> <p>At bar 12, I threw in some hybrid picking. Obviously, this wasn't in the original, but since it wasn’t written for guitar, almost anything goes, as I said earlier. I put this part in to help my students work on their hybrid picking as well as being able to quickly transition from standard picking to hybrid picking. To get into the hybrid phrase, I threw in a short legato line, which will allow you to set up your right hand for the hybrid picking.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/hybrid-00001.jpg" width="620" height="103" alt="hybrid-00001.jpg" /></p> <p>Practice "Flight of the Bumblebee" slowly and memorize it. Eventually you can use it as a warmup “exercise." The best exercises are the most musical ones. If any part of it gives you trouble, isolate that one part and work on it slowly until you get it. You might find yourself working on independent parts of the piece as separate exercises. </p> <p>The tempo I played it at in the video below is 180 bpm. Do your best to play it at whatever tempo sounds good to you. It could be slower than mine or faster. The most important thing is that it sounds good and you are relaxed while playing it at all times. If you begin to tense up, slow it down. It’s a long piece, so you will have to build up endurance to play it at challenging tempos. Have fun with it and good luck!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/0m8kyT_o_U0?list=UUozoKYJmat8MUYcdRo40cHA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/bumblebee-00001.jpg" width="620" height="732" alt="bumblebee-00001.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/bumblebee-00002.jpg" width="620" height="760" alt="bumblebee-00002.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/bumblebee-00003.jpg" width="620" height="770" alt="bumblebee-00003.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/bumblebee-00004.jpg" width="620" height="652" alt="bumblebee-00004.jpg" /></p> <p><em>Steve Booke is a composer for film and TV from the New York area. His compositions range from orchestral to metal to world styles from every corner of the earth. A graduate of Berklee College of Music, Steve has played guitar for more than 27 years. He has recorded 10 albums of his own and has played on countless others. He plays gigs in the NY area and tours the East Coast with a variety of bands. He has performed with Ben E. King and members of Mahavishnu Orchestra. He endorses D'Addario/Planet Waves, Larrivee Guitars, Levy's Leathers, Peavey, Stylus Pick, Finale PrintMusic, Pigtronix, Tech 21, Toontrack, Graph Tech, Seymour Duncan, Waves, Studio Devil and L.R. Baggs. His music is available on iTunes and Amazon. He can be contacted at info@stevebooke.com. Visit <a href="http://www.stevebooke.com/">stevebooke.com</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/what-world-not-just-another-flight-bumblebee-lesson#comments Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov Steve Booke What In the World Blogs Lessons Tue, 07 Apr 2015 12:17:01 +0000 Steve Booke http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18202 Exotic Techniques: Reverse Pedal Point Technique http://www.guitarworld.com/exotic-techniques-reverse-pedal-point-technique <!--paging_filter--><p>In this lesson, I will demonstrate an interesting method of utilizing your index finger on your picking hand, which is traditionally used for two-handed tapping. </p> <p>The tablature shows a descending legato run in the key of A natural minor comprised of groupings of eight notes.</p> <p>There are no picked notes whatsoever here, just unassisted hammer-ons and pull-offs. The note that you see notated as being a "tapped" note with the capital "T" symbol is actually fretted with any finger from your picking hand. This allows you to use your fingers on your fretting hand to pull off and hammer onto the "reverse pedal point" (the note being fretted by your picking hand), as I like to call it (for lack of better terms). </p> <p>In essence, this allows you to cross one hand over and behind the other to create this effect. After every bar (every 16 notes) in this example is when I like to move my reverse pedal point to the next string. The most challenging aspect of this technique is keeping the strings from ringing out around the note being fretted. </p> <p>With a little trial and error, you can experiment with your own methods and find a specific angle and position for your left and right hand that will allow you to execute this example without much excess noise. This technique also requires considerable strength from your fretting hand, because the notes being generated are created by the momentum of one hand, rather than being picked and fretted by two hands.</p> <p>Check out the video and figures below.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/Q4_tx7mjz34" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Reverse%20Pedal%20Point%20Technique%20%28smaller%20title%29.jpg" width="620" height="501" alt="Reverse Pedal Point Technique (smaller title).jpg" /></p> <p><em>Cyamak Ashtiani is an award-winning rock/pop guitarist and songwriter who has written, toured and recorded with a multitude of major and indie recording artists. Recently, he has toured with Rockstar: Supernova's Lukas Rossi and country/rap artist Mikel Knight. You can catch his new project with former Dry Cell frontman Jeff Gutt at <a href="http://www.shadesofthevillain.com/">ShadesOfTheVillain.com</a> and his clothing line at <a href="http://www.1251clothing.com/">1251Clothing.com</a>, of which he is a cofounder.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/exotic-techniques-reverse-pedal-point-technique#comments Cyamak Ashtiani Exotic Techniques Blogs Features Lessons Tue, 07 Apr 2015 12:13:45 +0000 Cyamak Ashtiani http://www.guitarworld.com/article/14210 Thrash Course with Dave Davidson: Using Mixed Meters, and How to Play “Labyrinth of Eyes,” Part 2 — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/thrash-course-dave-davidson-using-mixed-meters-and-how-play-labyrinth-eyes-part-2-video <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the May 2015 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-15-joan-jett?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=May2015VideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>Last month, I detailed several of the primary riffs in the Revocation song “Labyrinth of Eyes,” from our 2014 album, <em>Deathless</em>. Those riffs, as you recall, are played in 12/8 meter. </p> <p>This month, I’d like to show you the song’s remaining primary riffs, which introduce an unexpected twist by shifting to two bars of 3/4 followed by a bar of 2/4. </p> <p>One could alternatively count these phrases as being in straight 4/4 time, as two bars of 4/4 totals the same number of beats, eight, but once you play through these figures, I’m sure you’ll appreciate the rhythmic merit of utilizing the shifting meters, which correspond to the phrasing in a more logical way.</p> <p> While maintaining the inherent eighth-note triplet feel of 12/8 meter—three evenly spaced eighth notes per beat—I begin with a phrase based on Abdim7, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 1.</strong></p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-15-joan-jett?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=May2015VideosPage">For the rest of this column, including the tabs, check out the May 2015 issue of Guitar World.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/BLCaT5mLeig" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/thrash-course-dave-davidson-using-mixed-meters-and-how-play-labyrinth-eyes-part-2-video#comments Dave Davidson May 2015 Revocation Thrash Course Videos News Lessons Magazine Tue, 07 Apr 2015 11:41:28 +0000 Dave Davidson http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23799 The Eddie Van Halen Tremolo Mechanic — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/eddie-van-halen-tremolo-mechanic-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Van Halen’s recent <em>Jimmy Kimmel Live</em> performance affords an almost <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/van-halen-perform-hot-teacher-eruption-and-you-really-got-me-jimmy-kimmel-live-video">perfect glimpse of Eddie Van Halen’s legendarily unique approach to tremolo picking.</a></p> <p>The incredible speed and consistency of his take on this technique has been a source of fascination for 35 years. </p> <p>In Van Halen’s approach, the picking hand hangs suspended in mid-air, with no anchoring or muting at all, and uses a middle-index pick grip to generate positively giant picking movements. It really seems to break all the rules. </p> <p>But given Van Halen’s obviously natural gifts for mechanical efficiency, maybe that just means we should re-examine what the rules really are.</p> <p>I'm giving away a free <a href="http://www.troygrady.com/mechanics/">Masters in Mechanics</a> subscription to anyone who can post a tutorial illustrating exactly how it's done! Learn more about <a href="http://www.troygrady.com/mechanics/">Masters in Mechanics here!</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/C40Sj2uKzoE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Troy Grady is the creator of <a href="http://troygrady.com/code/">Cracking the Code</a>, a documentary series with a unique analytical approach to understanding guitar technique. Melding archival footage, in-depth interviews, painstakingly crafted animation and custom soundtrack, it’s a pop-science investigation of an age-old mystery: Why are some players seemingly super-powered?</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/van-halen">Van Halen</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/eddie-van-halen">Eddie Van Halen</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/eddie-van-halen-tremolo-mechanic-video#comments Cracking the Code Eddie Van Halen Troy Grady Van Halen Videos Blogs News Lessons Mon, 06 Apr 2015 16:27:23 +0000 Troy Grady http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23878 Romancing the Fretboard: Chopin Arranged for Guitar, Part 1 http://www.guitarworld.com/romancing-fretboard-chopin-arranged-guitar-part-1 <!--paging_filter--><p>Here's the first installment of Chopin's Piano Concerto in A minor, Opus No. 2. I've arranged it for guitar, and as you can see, it's not for the meek. </p> <p>But if you've been diligently practicing the chromatic exercises from my past few lessons, you should be ready to tackle it.</p> <p>This etude is an excellent study in the use of chromatic tones in a melody. I've included chord symbols above the staff to give you an idea of the melody's harmonic context. These chord symbols reflect the basic underlying harmony originally provided by the left hand part on the piano. </p> <p>Studying classical music, especially pieces from the Romantic period such as this, will give you serious insight into how to use chromatic passages in a composition or improvisation and have them make sense.</p> <p>You might be wondering, how the hell can you use this chromatic stuff in a rock song? All you have to do is listen to some Dream Theater tunes for the answer. </p> <p>For example, "Caught in a Web" has an extended chromatic passage [see the complete transcription in the Jan. '95 issue of Guitar School-Ed.]. The chromatic scale offers great material for writing cool riffs, but, more importantly, it gives you options for smoothly weaving in and out of a key center.</p> <p><img src="http://www.guitarworld.com/files/JPchopin1.gif" /><br /> <img src="http://www.guitarworld.com/files/JPchopin2.gif" /><br /> <img src="http://www.guitarworld.com/files/JPchopin3.gif" /><br /> <img src="http://www.guitarworld.com/files/JPchopin4.gif" /><br /> <img src="http://www.guitarworld.com/files/JPchopin5.gif" /><br /> <img src="http://www.guitarworld.com/files/JPchopin6.gif" /></p> <p>After playing this piece for a while, you should be able to pick up a few chromatic ideas to apply to your own solos. You'll start to see how you don't have to be tied to a particular scale or fingering pattern-you'll feel more comfortable playing notes that are out of the key center. </p> <p>And by intelligently applying chromatic notes to your lines, such as using them as passing tones to connect chord tones that fall on the strong beats, they can become more original-sounding while still retaining harmonic logic. Of course, you can just play random chromatic lines all over the place, but that's a different, more atonal style of music.</p> <p><strong>Here are a few performance tips:</strong></p> <p>Notice that there are quite a few position changes. As such, the left-hand fingerings have to be arranged to make shifting positions as easy as possible. That's why, though the music may be the same (as in measures 1-2 and 5-6), the tablature is different on the repeat (use the tablature on the bottom the second time through). Carefully follow the left-hand fingerings provided beneath the tablature-these are the ones that I use.</p> <p>My arrangement is just for the melody line, but since this is a piano piece, it was originally written so the left hand would play chords and the right hand would play the melody. To truly appreciate the richness and depth of Chopin's melodic and harmonic style, you might want to record yourself strumming the chord changes (or have a friend play them) while you play the melody.</p> <p>Chopin was a master of melody, harmony and voice leading--the art of smoothly moving from chord to chord. Though the melody of this piece is mostly chromatic, notice how he targets a chord tone on the first 16th note of each beat. Let's look at the first measure: although it's written using an ascending chromatic scale starting on A, notice how, when the chord changes from Am to Dm, the melody lands on F, which is the third of Dm. Over the E7 chord in the third measure, Chopin targets the third of that chord (G#). If you follow along, you can see other prominent examples of this harmonic device, such as targeting the lowered fifth of F7b5 (B) and the lowered seventh of B7 (A). This is what I referred to earlier as the logic of writing chromatic lines. This should give you plenty to work with. Next time, Part 2!</p> <p><strong>This column originally appeared in <em>Guitar World</em> as part of John Petrucci's "Wild Stringdom" column.</strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/romancing-fretboard-chopin-arranged-guitar-part-1#comments Dream Theater John Petrucci Blogs News Features Lessons Magazine Mon, 06 Apr 2015 12:14:58 +0000 John Petrucci http://www.guitarworld.com/article/14929