Lessons http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/8/0 en Wild Stringdom with John Petrucci: Moving Across the Fretboard in Unusual Ways to Produce Unique Runs http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-moving-across-fretboard-unusual-ways-produce-unique-runs <!--paging_filter--><p>Over the years, people have noticed that when I play certain runs, my fingers move in the opposite direction of the notes that they hear.</p> <p>For example, as my fret hand moves up the fretboard, the sequence of notes that is heard descends (and vice versa). For this month’s column, I’ve put together a few runs that demonstrate this unusual approach as applied to both ascending and descending patterns.</p> <p>This kind of “positional wizardry” can be used to generate interesting melodic patterns that can be used in a variety of ways. </p> <p> In <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, I begin on the low E string in a high fretboard position and end on a high string in a lower position. The run is based on the A Aeolian mode (A B C D E F G), which is also known as the A natural minor scale and is intervallically spelled 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7. </p> <p> The overall concept behind this line is a consistent progression of six-note groups, or “cells,” that move to different areas of the fretboard while remaining diatonic to (within the scale structure of) A Aeolian. The run is played in a rhythm of even 16th notes, which, due to its inherent four-note grouping, results in a more unusual melodic “shape” than if I had played the pattern in a triplet or sextuplet rhythm. </p> <p> I begin by ascending through the first six notes—E F G A B C—then “backpedal” slightly and descend to the previous two notes, B and A, in alternating fashion. The next six-note phrase begins on G, two scale degrees higher than the previous starting note, and consists of the notes G A B C D E, played in ascending form. </p> <p>Once again, I alternate between the last two notes in the same way, which sets up the beginning of the next six-note phrase, starting on B on the fourth string’s ninth fret, which is two scale degrees higher than the previous starting point. This “up-six, back-two” pattern then repeats three more times, culminating on a high A root note. Be sure to use consistent alternate (down-up-down-up) picking throughout this figure, and, as always, strive for crystal-clear articulation.</p> <p> In <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, I begin on the high E string and work my way up the fretboard while descending gradually on each lower string, pitch-wise. Like <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, this run is also based on A Aeolian/natural minor and six-note “cells” played in a 16th-note rhythm. </p> <p> After descending through the first six notes—F E D C B A—I quickly shift up the fretboard to a note that is three scale degrees higher in the scale, D, and then repeat the descending six-note pattern. This second sequence ends on F (third string, 10th fret), so I begin the next six-note sequence three scale degrees higher, on B (third string, 16th fret). </p> <p>This process repeats three more times, culminating in a low A root note (sixth string, 17th fret). Again, alternate picking is utilized throughout, so strive for even and precise execution.</p> <p> <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> provides a clearer picture of the shapes used in <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> by illustrating them as eighth-note triplets. Here, one can more easily see how the six-note pattern descends through the notes of A natural minor across two beats at a time. When playing the run in a straight 16th-note rhythm (rather than in an eighth- or 16th-note-triplet rhythm), be cognizant of the difference in feel and where the downbeats fall.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2979782854001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2979782854001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-15%20at%202.25.01%20PM.png" width="620" height="644" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-15 at 2.25.01 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-moving-across-fretboard-unusual-ways-produce-unique-runs#comments Dream Theater February 2014 John Petrucci Wild Stringdom Artist Lessons Videos News Lessons Magazine Tue, 15 Apr 2014 18:32:35 +0000 John Petrucci http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20105 Betcha Can't Play This: Phrygian-Dominant Male — Sylvain Coudret of Soilwork http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-phrygian-dominant-male-sylvain-coudret-soilwork <!--paging_filter--><p> This is a single-note run based on the D Phrygian dominant mode [D Eb F# G A Bb C] that incorporates several different playing techniques to create an interesting, rolling contour. </p> <p> I tune my guitar to drop-B, which is drop-D tuning down one and one half steps [low to high, B F# B E G# C#], so while I’m thinking of the run as being in D, it actually sounds in B [Phrygian dominant].</p> <p> Bars 1–3 are played entirely on the G string and feature sextuplet phrasing [six-note groupings], with an extra two 16th notes tagged onto the end of each bar, which makes it an odd-meter lick [13/8 instead of 12/8]. I alternate pick the first three notes of each sextuplet with palm muting [P.M.], followed by an un-muted double pull-off, which creates a nice contrast, going back and forth from staccato to legato articulation. </p> <p> There’s a four-fret stretch required in these first three bars, so make sure your fingers and wrist are thoroughly warmed up before playing the lick, to avoid uncomfortable cramping or possible injury. Be sure to palm mute the bottom three strings throughout these first three bars, even when doing the pull-offs on the G string, in order to keep them from ringing.</p> <p> Bar 4 is built on diminished-seven arpeggio shapes and introduces some string skipping between the G and high E strings and ascending and descending legato finger slides, which I use to shift positions. </p> <p> The run winds up in bar 5 with some unbroken alternate picking as I ascend the D Phrygian-dominant mode across the top four strings, leading to a high D note at the 10th fret, which I shake then slide down from. Notice that I add a couple of chromatic passing tones on the top two strings during this final ascent. </p> <p>These extra notes serve to smooth out the contour of the line and make for an even number of notes per string [four], which works well with this kind of alternate-picked run.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience818756776001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="818756776001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-14%20at%204.57.43%20PM.png" width="620" height="509" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-14 at 4.57.43 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-phrygian-dominant-male-sylvain-coudret-soilwork#comments Betcha Can't Play This December 2010 Soilwork Sylvain Coudret Videos Lessons Magazine Mon, 14 Apr 2014 21:16:25 +0000 Sylvain Coudret http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21012 Betcha Can't Play This: Luis Carlos Maldonado's Add9 Roller Coaster http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-luis-carlos-maldonados-add9-roller-coaster <!--paging_filter--><p> This is an alternate-picking run based on an add9 arpeggio shape on the top three strings that’s moved up and down the neck to four different positions and tonal centers, with a slight variation in bar 2. </p> <p>It begins in E, moves down to C with a little twist—more on that in a moment—then up to D and finally A.</p> <p> The first thing you’ll notice is that the pinkie is the lead-off finger in each bar and that a five-fret stretch is required between it and the index finger for the first two notes. [Fret-hand fingerings are indicated throughout the run.] </p> <p>Be sure to ease into these stretches and warm up with them in the upper area of the fretboard before attempting them in the lower positions.</p> <p> For bar 2, I felt it sounded more colorful and interesting to alter the basic Cadd9 arpeggio [C D E G] by incorporating the #11, or #4, F#, into it, and in so doing the notes on the B and G strings are played two frets higher than where they would be if I would have simply applied the initial add9 shape from bar 1 to this position. In bar 3, the pinkie does a quick slide up to D, and the initial cell from bar 1 is used again, only a whole step lower.</p> <p> Notice the common tones on the B and G strings in bars 2 and 3. The run concludes with a long pinkie slide up to A at the 17th fret—be careful not to overshoot it—and an Aadd9 arpeggio.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/FVUgmYFhH7Q" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-14%20at%204.32.24%20PM.png" width="620" height="238" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-14 at 4.32.24 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-luis-carlos-maldonados-add9-roller-coaster#comments Betcha Can't Play This Luis Carlos Maldonado May 2010 Videos Blogs News Lessons Magazine Mon, 14 Apr 2014 21:03:09 +0000 Luis Carlos Maldonado http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21011 Merchant of Menace with Jeff Loomis: Incorporating Sweep Arpeggios with Fast-Moving Position Shifts http://www.guitarworld.com/merchant-menace-jeff-loomis-incorporating-sweep-arpeggios-fast-moving-position-shifts <!--paging_filter--><p> This month, I ’d like to finish our analysis of the guitar solo from the title track of Nevermore’s latest release, <em>The Obsidian Conspiracy</em>, with a look at the last four bars of the solo, which carry into the first bar of the subsequent verse.</p> <p> The majority of what I play during this section is built from sweep arpeggios of B minor triads (B D F#) that shift through a variety of positions. There’s a lot happening in this little four-bar section, so let’s get to it.</p> <p> For this last section of the solo, illustrated in <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, I’m playing over the same rhythm part that was illustrated in last month’s column. </p> <p>As this rhythm part sits on the B minor “home” tonality for two full bars, it gives me plenty of room to explore fast-moving sweeps based on B minor triads: I begin in 10th position on the top three strings, quickly descending as I pull off with the pinkie on F#, first string/14th fret, to the index finger on D, first string/10th fret, followed by the middle finger on B, second string/12th fret. </p> <p>The index finger then moves down to F#, third string/11th fret to complete the first descent, after which I ascend through the same series of notes, and then carry the subsequent descent back through the same note series all the way down to the fifth string in one long upstroke sweep. </p> <p> <strong>FIGURE 2a</strong> illustrates this sweep in isolation; notice that the arpeggio covers three octaves, starting from a high F# (the fifth of B) and carrying through to F# two octaves lower. The nice thing about playing a seven-string is that it allows me to expand this downward sweeping pattern all the way down through another complete octave, culminating on a low F#, seventh string/ninth fret, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 2b</strong>. </p> <p>If you put the pieces of both sweeps together, you get the complete 9th/10th position sweep shown in <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>. I recommend that you practice each of these elements with both upstroke and downstroke sweeps, starting slowly and concentrating on clear articulation when either dragging the pick across the strings.</p> <p> Looking back at <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, you can see that I like to “cycle” smaller pieces of the arpeggios before expanding them across the majority of the strings. For example, I begin by repeating the small four-note/three-string sweep on the top three strings, and then, on beat three, I “cycle” the four-note/three-string sweep across the bottom three strings.</p> <p> Then on beat four, I sweep back across all of the strings, from low to high. Bar 2 begins in a similar fashion to bar 1, but starting on the upbeat of beat two, with the index finger on F#, fifth string/ninth fret, I change positions by sliding the index finger up to B at the 14th fret, allowing me to initiate upward and downward sweeps across 14th position B minor triads, which I then “cycle” up and down across the top five strings.</p> <p> On the upbeat of beat four in bar 2, I use the index finger once again for a quick position shift, sliding from F# at the 14th fret to the B root note at the 19th fret. Now situated in 19th position in bar 4, I wrap up the solo with more conventional B Aeolian type riffs, utilizing hammer-ons, pulloffs and bends for a legato sound, emphasizing very wide vibratos on each sustained note. </p> <p> I tried to articulate a feeling of rhythmic freedom while executing all of these sweeps, thus the odd groupings of decuplets (10 notes played over one beat) and nonuplets (nine notes played over one beat) as well as pairs of 32nd note sextuplets (six notes) played over one beat.</p> <p> The rhythmic precision of these groupings is less important than the effect created by crossing the strings in alternating sweeps very quickly, which takes a lot of practice to master. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience919847812001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="919847812001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-14%20at%203.43.41%20PM_0.png" width="620" height="498" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-14 at 3.43.41 PM_0.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-14%20at%203.43.54%20PM.png" width="620" height="152" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-14 at 3.43.54 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jeff-loomis">Jeff Loomis</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/merchant-menace-jeff-loomis-incorporating-sweep-arpeggios-fast-moving-position-shifts#comments 2011 February 2011 Jeff Loomis The Merchant of Menace Blogs Lessons Magazine Mon, 14 Apr 2014 19:50:37 +0000 Jeff Loomis http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21010 Betcha Can't Play This: Bill Hudson's Lydian Cascade http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-bill-hudsons-lydian-cascade <!--paging_filter--><p>This is a scalar run based on the F Lydian mode [F G A B C D E], which is the fifth mode of C major. It incorporates several different lead-playing techniques and sounds cool when played over an F or F5 chord.</p> <p>I start off with an ascending F major triad [F A C] sweep across the top four strings, played in a rhythm of 16th-note triplets. </p> <p>Once I hit the high E string, I switch to legato phrasing, continuing the triplet rhythm and using all four fret-hand fingers, spread out wide, to perform "stacked" hammer-ons and pull-offs, capped off by a pick-hand tap with the middle finger.</p> <p> Once I come back down to the F note at the 13th fret, I skip over to the G string, where I play another legato sequence, this time incorporating a descending finger slide followed by two hammer-ons and three consecutive taps with the pick hand, using the first, second and fourth fingers.</p> <p> When performing this tapping sequence, I temporarily clamp the pick between my thumb and the top side of the fretboard. I then jump back up to the high E string and perform another ascending legato sequence, incorporating taps with the first and third fingers. </p> <p> After the last tapped note, I switch to straight alternate picking and play a descending sequence of cascading 16th notes and 16th-note triplets across the top four strings, followed by an ascending climb that finishes with a high bend. When practicing this lick, be mindful of the different rhythmic subdivisions used.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/9Btp369CEsg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-14%20at%201.08.38%20PM.png" width="620" height="379" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-14 at 1.08.38 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-bill-hudsons-lydian-cascade#comments Betcha Can't Play This Bill Hudson February 2011 Videos Blogs News Lessons Magazine Mon, 14 Apr 2014 17:22:24 +0000 Bill Hudson http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21007 Metal For Life with Metal Mike: Combining Various Techniques to Form Powerful Rhythm Parts http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-combining-various-techniques-form-powerful-rhythm-parts <!--paging_filter--><p><em>This video is bonus content related to the May 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-14-zakk-wylde-joe-satriani/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=MayVideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>Last month, I demonstrated ways that you can combine metal-style rhythm-guitar techniques and devices, such as two-note power chords and single-note riffs, to form powerfully hooky rhythm parts. </p> <p>When doing this, my goal is to maintain a melodic sensibility within rhythm figures that also serve to propel and drive a song’s groove. This month, I’ll expand on this approach by including full-voiced chords along with droning open strings, fast palm-muted single-note lines, dyads and triads. </p> <p>In doing so, I’ll demonstrate a range of useful metal techniques that you can focus on within one self-contained and intrinsically melodic rhythm part. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3373838774001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3373838774001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-combining-various-techniques-form-powerful-rhythm-parts#comments May 2014 Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak Videos News Lessons Magazine Fri, 11 Apr 2014 15:19:15 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20790 String Theory with Jimmy Brown: Hillbilly Shred — How to Sound Like a Bluegrass Mandolin Player http://www.guitarworld.com/string-theory-jimmy-brown-hillbilly-shred-how-sound-bluegrass-mandolin-player <!--paging_filter--><p><em>This video is bonus content related to the May 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-14-zakk-wylde-joe-satriani/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=MayVideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>A while back, I came across a book of traditional bluegrass and old-timey fiddle tunes, which intrigued and inspired me. </p> <p>I had always enjoyed the sound of those upbeat, “honest” folk melodies, with their sprightly contours and swinging eighth-note rhythms, despite their harmonic simplicity—the vast majority of the tunes are based on “one-four-five”-type major-key chord progressions. </p> <p>As the book was written for violinists (the violin and fiddle are the same instrument), the tunes were notated in standard sheet music, without tablature. Being a sightreader, however, I was able to cop the notes, and I began studying some of the tunes and attempting to adapt them to the guitar, pick-style, just as a bluegrass acoustic guitarist or mandolin player would. </p> <p>This month, I’d like to show you how I’ve arranged one of these fiddle tune for guitar and demonstrate a neat trick I came up with to make the guitar sound like a mandolin.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3386706530001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3386706530001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmy-brown">Jimmy Brown</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/string-theory-jimmy-brown-hillbilly-shred-how-sound-bluegrass-mandolin-player#comments Jimmy Brown May 2014 String Theory Videos News Lessons Magazine Thu, 10 Apr 2014 19:50:05 +0000 Jimmy Brown http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20789 Wild Stringdom with John Petrucci: Visualizing Melodic Shapes on the Fretboard http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-visualizing-melodic-shapes-fretboard <!--paging_filter--><p>This month, I’d like to delve deeper into concepts for expanding scalar ideas across the fretboard. </p> <p>As in the previous columns, I’ll demonstrate how to move diagonally across the fretboard to connect scale positions, an approach that I employ to a great extent to play melodic phrases and solos. </p> <p>Let’s start with a series of phrases that are all based on the E Aeolian mode, or E natural minor scale (E F# G A B C D). <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> details a series of three different three-note phrases, each played in a three-notes-per-string pattern and starting with the index finger. I begin in seventh position and play through the first six notes of E Aeolian. </p> <p>In bar 2, I shift up to ninth position and play a six-note pattern that begins on the fifth degree of E Aeolian, B, sounding the notes B C D E F# G. Finally, I move up to 11th position to play a six-note pattern beginning on the second, or ninth, F#, sounding the notes F# G A B C D. </p> <p> The high D at the end of the phrase is useful, because it can easily be bent up one whole step to the E root. By connecting all three patterns this way, I am moving up the fretboard in a diagonal path that covers a lot of range. </p> <p> A great way to practice this pattern is within a steady series of eighth-note triplets, as seen in <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>. Use alternate (down-up) picking throughout, and strive to make the position shifts seamless. Once you have these “shapes” for each six-note group under your fingers, you should be able to move freely from the A string to the D and G and back, using just your ear to guide the melodic phrases you create.</p> <p> Within the first six-note phrase, we have the notes of an E minor triad: E G B. Now let’s look at how we can apply notes from this series to create different chord types. In <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, I demonstrate voicings of Em, Esus2 and another “wide-stretch” Em voicing from the notes found in this pattern. I can then play melodic fills based on it. </p> <p> <strong>FIGURE 4 </strong> offers a more expanded example of this concept. I’ll often use this approach to create chordmelody-type ideas, such as that shown in <strong>FIGURE 5</strong>. Here, I’m using the open low E note as a pedal tone played against various two-note chords. I also like incorporating the ninth, F#, into Em voicings, resulting in the wide-stretch Em(add9) shapes shown in <strong>FIGURE 6.</strong> </p> <p> <strong>FIGURE 7</strong> puts a twist on this idea by adding the second, also F#, to an E minor triad, E G B. Lastly, I use note combinations from the pattern to create a series of two-note chords that live in E Aeolian, as demonstrated in <strong>FIGURE 8.</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2888611424001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2888611424001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-10%20at%202.09.53%20PM.png" width="580" height="604" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-10 at 2.09.53 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-10%20at%202.10.09%20PM.png" width="580" height="334" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-10 at 2.10.09 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-visualizing-melodic-shapes-fretboard#comments Dream Theater January 2014 John Petrucci Wild Stringdom Artist Lessons Videos Blogs News Lessons Magazine Thu, 10 Apr 2014 18:18:16 +0000 John Petrucci http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19912 Man of Steel with Steel Panther's Satchel: Utilizing Drop-D Tuning, and How to Play “Glory Hole” http://www.guitarworld.com/man-steel-steel-panthers-satchel-utilizing-drop-d-tuning-and-how-play-glory-hole <!--paging_filter--><p> This month I’d like to talk about a song from our forthcoming album, which will most likely be out by the time you read this, called… well, I have no idea what it’ll be called. </p> <p> But since it’s out now (I mean, by the time you are reading this) you will know the title, because you have it. I wish you could reach back from the future into the past and tell me the title, but I guess you can’t. Regardless of the title, it will no doubt be the all-time heaviest heavy metal album ever made…by us.</p> <p> The song I’d like to focus on here is a little ditty I call “Glory Hole.” It’s played in drop-D tuning down one half step (low to high, Db Ab Db Gb Bb Eb). If you are in standard tuning, simply tune your entire guitar down one half step, and then tune the sixth string down an additional whole step.</p> <p> The song’s primarily lick, shown in <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, is played almost entirely on the bottom three strings, the exception being the chromatically ascending (one fret at a time) root-fifth power chords that appear in bar 8. </p> <p> The riff is based on the D minor pentatonic scale (D F G A C), and I begin with a double pull-off on the fourth string, from G at the fifth fret to F at the third fret, and then to the open D string. I then pull off from D to C on the fifth and third frets of the fifth string, followed by the last two notes, F and D, on the sixth string.</p> <p> In bar 4 I play a tricky riff built from repeated pull-offs to the open fifth and fourth strings. Moving up chromatically, I begin by fretting a note on the fifth string, pull off to the open string and then repeat the process one fret higher as I gradually move up the fretboard. At the end of the bar, I move over to the fourth string to set up the return to G, the first note of the lick (bar 1). </p> <p> During the verse section, I switch to a low D pedal tone under the vocal part and then move back into the main lick. This is shown in bars 1–8 of <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>. I then switch to the power-chord-driven pre-chorus, followed by the equally power-chord-fueled chorus. Good song!</p> <p> This record sounds much better if you turn it up loud, have a couple of shots of Jack Daniels, and hang out in the hot tub with a few of your lady friends. I know that’s how most of you nine-year-olds out there are going to be listening to the new record, which I think is pretty badass!</p> <p><strong>PART ONE</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2719597180001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2719597180001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <strong>PART TWO</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2719593528001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2719593528001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-09%20at%2012.47.05%20PM.png" width="620" height="721" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-09 at 12.47.05 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-09%20at%2012.47.29%20PM.png" width="620" height="232" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-09 at 12.47.29 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/man-steel-steel-panthers-satchel-utilizing-drop-d-tuning-and-how-play-glory-hole#comments December 2013 Man of Steel Satchel Steel Panther News Lessons Magazine Wed, 09 Apr 2014 16:49:31 +0000 Steel Panther&#039;s Satchel http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19401 Betcha Can't Play This: Dave Reffett's Symmetrical Spider http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-dave-reffetts-symmetrical-spider <!--paging_filter--><p> This is a wide-stretch, legato string-skipping idea that’s based on a symmetrical fretboard shape that moves across the neck in a single position. </p> <p> It’s articulated entirely with fret-hand hammer-ons and pull-offs and, as demonstrated in the video below, I use my pick hand as a string damper by reaching over behind the fret hand and lightly grabbing the neck to mute the idle strings and prevent them from ringing.</p> <p> This lick requires quite a wide stretch, so make sure your fret hand is warmed and limbered up. All the notes except for the very last one fall on the 12th, 15th and 19th frets, fingered with the index finger, middle finger and pinkie, respectively. </p> <p> The first note on each string is initiated with a tap, or "hammer-on from nowhere," at either the 12th or 19th fret, followed by conventional hammer-ons or pull-offs. The goal here is even note volume, so make sure each hammer-on is quick and firm, and when pulling off, be sure to yank the string in toward the palm as you let go of it.</p> <p> I stay on the top three strings for the first two bars, then make my way over to the lower strings in bars 3 and 4. When I get to the low E, I go 19, 12, 15, then slide the middle finger from the 15th fret up to the 21st and perform a wide pull-down bend, decorating it with some fierce vibrato. Be sure to reinforce the bend and vibrato with the index finger.</p> <p> The lick sounds pretty cool and dissonant when played over Em or E5. You could also try playing it conventionally, attacking the first note on each string with the pick.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Px59CFAicnE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-09%20at%2010.49.09%20AM.png" width="620" height="223" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-09 at 10.49.09 AM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-dave-reffetts-symmetrical-spider#comments Betcha Can't Play This Dave Reffett October 2010 Videos Blogs News Lessons Magazine Wed, 09 Apr 2014 14:54:20 +0000 Dave Reffett http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20974 Exclusive: Steve Howe Video Lesson http://www.guitarworld.com/exclusive-steve-howe-video-lesson <!--paging_filter--><p>In the following video, legendary Yes guitarist Steve Howe shows you how to play the key riffs to several Yes classics, including "Starship Trooper," "Siberian Khatru" and "Mood for a Day."</p> <p>Howe recently stopped by <em>Guitar World</em> HQ once again, this time to answer readers' questions. </p> <p>To find out more about his vintage guitar collection, the first song he learned to play and much more, head <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-steve-howe-yes-and-asia-answers-guitar-world-readers-questions">here</a>.</p> <p>Yes released their first studio album in 10 years, <em>Fly From Here</em>, in 2011. Their next album, <em>Heaven And Earth</em>, will be released July 8. It will be the first Yes album to feature new vocalist Jon Davison.</p> <p>Enjoy!</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1729299002001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1729299002001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/steve-howe">Steve Howe</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/yes">Yes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/exclusive-steve-howe-video-lesson#comments Steve Howe Yes Artist Lessons Videos News Lessons Magazine Tue, 08 Apr 2014 16:57:55 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/3225 Betcha Can't Play This: Tapping and Skipping with Andy Wood http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-tapping-and-skipping-andy-wood <!--paging_filter--><p>This is a tapping run that incorporates string skipping and a couple of fret-hand finger slides.</p> <p> It’s based on the A natural minor scale [A B C D E F G], but the notes are organized into arpeggios, which imply some interesting "tall" chord sounds. </p> <p>Although it is played in steady 16th notes, it sounds and feels out of time because of the unusual melodic contour.</p> <p> When skipping to another string, often the first note is hammered on "from nowhere" by one of the fret-hand fingers [indicated by "H"]. Strive for an even attack and volume note to note, making each hammer-on quick and firm. When pulling off, flick the string slightly sideways, in toward the palm. </p> <p>I tap a couple of the notes on the high E string with my ring finger, which makes the jumps across the strings a little easier. Mute the strings you’re not playing on with your pick-hand palm to keep them from ringing.</p> <p> The lick ends with a big bend on the B string, which I perform by tapping the string then bending it upward with both hands, using the fret hand’s fingers to help the tapping finger bend the string.</p> <p> For more on Wood and his band, Down from Up, visit <a href="http://www.andywoodmusic.com/">andywoodmusic.com</a> and <a href="http://www.downfromup.com/">downfromup.com</a>. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/uvyxn2kkEVY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-07%20at%203.43.33%20PM.png" width="620" height="393" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-07 at 3.43.33 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-tapping-and-skipping-andy-wood#comments Andy Wood Betcha Can't Play This Down From Up June 2010 Betcha Can't Play This Blogs News Lessons Magazine Mon, 07 Apr 2014 20:16:23 +0000 Andy Wood http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20956 Jazz Guitar Corner: One Quick Trick to Solo Over 7b9 Chords http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-one-quick-trick-solo-over-7b9-chords <!--paging_filter--><p>One of the questions I get asked the most is, “How can I spice up my diminished-scale soloing ideas beyond just playing the scale or the arpeggio?”</p> <p>To help answer this question, in this lesson we’ll be looking into one of my favorite ways to expand your 7b9 diminished soloing ideas using various arpeggios built from the underlying harmony of the scale. </p> <p>By looking into the four dim7 and four 7th chords that are built from this scale, you can quickly expand your 7b9 diminished soloing ideas without having to study anything beyond these two common arpeggio shapes. </p> <p>Let’s dig in and check out how you can use harmonic arpeggios to build interesting lines when using a 7b9 diminished scale in your soloing ideas. </p> <p><strong>What is the 7b9 Diminished Scale?</strong></p> <p>To begin, let’s take a quick look at the 7b9 diminished scale, otherwise known as the half whole diminished scale, before moving on to looking at the harmony built from the notes in this scale. </p> <p>This eight-note scale has the following interval pattern:</p> <p>Root-m2-m3-M3-D5-P5-6-b7</p> <p>You can think of some of these notes as several intervals depending on how you see the fretboard, such as seeing the M3 as a D4, or the D5 as an A4, but I find that the above intervals are the easiest way for me to visualize them quickly on the fretboard. </p> <p>This scale, as the name suggests, is used to solo over a 7b9 chords, and you can see a sample two-octave fingering for this scale over an A7b9 chord below. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Diminished%20Harmony%201.jpg" width="620" height="157" alt="Diminished Harmony 1.jpg" /></p> <p>If this scale is new to you, try working it in 12 keys across the fretboard, as well as finding at least two or three fingerings you can use to play this scale in different parts of the fretboard, such as sixth-, fifth- and fourth-string root fingerings. </p> <p><strong>7b9 Diminished Scale Harmony</strong></p> <p>One of the coolest musical concepts that comes from the 7b9 diminished scale, again otherwise known as the half-whole diminished scale, is the arpeggio patterns that are derived from this scale. </p> <p>Along with the four dim7 chords that come from this scale, from the b9, 3, 5 and b7 of the underlying chord, you can also derive four 7th chords from the same scale, built from the root, b3, b5 and dim7 of the scale. </p> <p>When applied to an A7b9 chord, you can build four dim7 and four 7th chords from the underlying diminished scale that you can then use to solo over this chord type in your jazz guitar improvisations. </p> <p>7ths – A7, C7, Eb7, Gb7<br /> dim7 – Bbdim7, Dbdim7, Edim7, Gdim7</p> <p>You can see these arpeggios with a sample fingering below that you can use as a starting point when taking these arpeggios to your jazz guitar practice routine. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Diminished%20Harmony%202-png.jpg" width="620" height="313" alt="Diminished Harmony 2-png.jpg" /></p> <p>When you have worked out this arpeggio pattern over A7b9, make sure to practice it in other positions on the fretboard for this chord, as well as apply this concept to all 12 keys of 7b9 chords around the fretboard as you expand upon these arps in the woodshed. </p> <p>As well, try putting on a 7b9 backing track and play these arpeggios, one at a time or several combined at once, over this track in order to hear how they sound when applied to a harmonic situation. </p> <p><strong>7b9 Diminished Scale Lick</strong></p> <p>To help you take this idea to a musical situation in your practicing, here is a sample lick that uses the arpeggios from the previous section to outline the V7b9 chord in a ii V I progression in the key of D minor. </p> <p>Once you have memorized this lick in the key of D minor, practice running it through all 12 keys at different tempos around the fretboard, as well as apply it to tunes that you are shedding in your practice routine. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/143545608&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Diminished%20Harmony%203.jpg" width="620" height="163" alt="Diminished Harmony 3.jpg" /></p> <p>When this lick is comfortable in your playing, try writing out three to five similar licks of your own that use the concepts from this lesson to create those jazz guitar 7b9 phrases. </p> <p><strong>Practicing 7b9 Diminished Scale Harmony</strong></p> <p>Once you have checked out the arpeggios and lick in the above lesson, you can move forward with this material in your own jazz guitar practice routine. Here are five exercises you can do to expand upon these ideas. </p> <p><strong>01.</strong> Put on an A7b9 backing track and solo over that chord using the A7 half-whole diminished scale as the basis for your lines.<br /> <strong>02.</strong> Solo over the same A7b9 backing track using only the four 7th chords from the HW dim scale to build your lines, A7-C7-Eb7-Gb7.<br /> <strong>03.</strong> Solo over the same A7b9 backing track using only the four dim7 chords from the HW dim scale to build your lines, Bbdim7-Dbdim7-Edim7-Gdim7.<br /> <strong>04.</strong> Repeat exercises 1 to 3 over all 12 keys for 7b9 chords.<br /> <strong>05.</strong> Put on a tune such as "Tune Up" by Miles Davis and treat every 7th chord as a 7b9 chord in order to use the scale and arps from this lesson to build your lines over those changes. </p> <p>From there, try taking this diminished scale harmony material to other tunes that you know or are working on in the woodshed as you take these concepts further in the practice room. </p> <p>Do you have a question about 7b9 diminished scale harmony? Share your thoughts in the comments section below. </p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a lecturer in Popular Music Performance at the University of Chester and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-one-quick-trick-solo-over-7b9-chords#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Mon, 07 Apr 2014 17:29:28 +0000 Matt Warnock http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20951 Working Toward Extreme Hybrid Picking http://www.guitarworld.com/working-toward-extreme-hybrid-picking <!--paging_filter--><p>Usually you hear hybrid picking associated with country guitar or all things Eric Johnson. </p> <p>It's not a particularly aggressive technique, so it's rare in hard rock and metal. </p> <p>Hybrid picking in a Metallica song? Probably not. But Metallica is Metallica — and you're you. </p> <p>People might have said slap guitar isn't metal, but the riff from 1:30 to 2:00 in <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g68hQ4zJ3t0#aid=P8lM-cypxoA">"The Woven Web" by Animals As Leaders</a> says otherwise. </p> <p>So let's dive into hybrid picking and see if we can get a nice riff from it.</p> <p><strong>Example 1</strong> is a good start. This is a D major spread triad in the root position. Use your pick for the fifth fret, your middle finger for the next string and your ring finger for the highest one. The order should be pick-middle-ring-middle. </p> <p>If hybrid picking is new to you, I'd say start the metronome (which you should be using throughout all of this) at 70 and work your way up. If it's not new, start around 115. <strong>Example 1</strong> is really just to get the right hand familiar and has little to do with melody.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/ex.1_1.jpg" width="321" height="174" alt="ex.1_1.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Example 2</strong> adds the challenge of switching the strings you're plucking and the chord voicing. Switching over strings at high speeds can be tricky and sometimes results in the fingers sort of tripping over each other. To me, this is sort of starting to sound musical, the way a piano player might try to make D sound pretty. Throughout this entire lesson, we'll be dealing with spread triads anyway, which sound more piano-like.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/ex.2_2.jpg" width="258" height="210" alt="ex.2_2.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Example 3</strong> is a harder version of <strong>Example 2</strong> in that the plucking hand completely moves from one set of strings to another. Melodically, it adds a larger leap in the top notes of the voicings, which can create a similar effect to tapping a octave above wherever you're playing. </p> <p>The hardest part here will be for the left hand. Switching between two voicings so different quickly and cleanly will really help you get your left hand get familiar with chord shapes as there won't be enough time to think about where your fingers are headed.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/ex.3_2.jpg" width="260" height="187" alt="ex.3_2.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Example 4</strong> is the big toughie I came up with one night. It almost sounds like tapping because of the spread triads moving high and low so quickly, but it has a distinct hybrid picking vibe. </p> <p>This will definitely get your left hand working hard to get to each chord cleanly and in time, especially going from the high A major chord back down to D major. You're probably going to have to slide back down. This also introduces the first minor chord, F# minor. This idea is more melodic, rhythmic and harmonically interesting than the previous ones, and (to me) sounds like it could be an interesting verse riff. </p> <p>If the technique is new to you, I'd suggest starting this one at 60 bpm or so, as it is rather extreme for both hands. If it's not new, more like 120bpm. Try to get it to 140 and it'll be insane. Also at the end is a fun muted 16th-note triplet leading to a high E natural harmonic. It's tough to keep in time, but the harmonic allows your hand a second to get back to D. </p> <p>Hope you have fun with this one!</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/ex.4_2.jpg" width="620" height="227" alt="ex.4_2.jpg" /></p> <p>If you have questions, feel free to leave them in the comments section or reach out to me at <a href="http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzm5WT7pRIT9QRRp3VRyaIA">my YouTube channel here</a>, and I'll get back to you. </p> <p><em>Elliott Klein is a New York City-based guitarist/singer/songwriter who plays in <a href="http://brightandloud.bandcamp.com">Bright and Loud</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/partylightsband">Party Lights</a> and many more.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/working-toward-extreme-hybrid-picking#comments Elliott Klein Blogs Lessons Mon, 07 Apr 2014 17:27:30 +0000 Elliott Klein http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20952 In Deep with Andy Aledort: A Further Exploration of Playing Slide in Open G Tuning http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-further-exploration-playing-slide-open-g-tuning <!--paging_filter--><p><em>This video is bonus content related to the May 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-14-zakk-wylde-joe-satriani/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=MayVideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p><strong>Be sure to check out my brand-new website, <a href="http://www.andyaledort.com/">andyaledort.com</a>, which has all of the latest gig info, gear, lesson (private and Skype), session availability and more!</strong></p> <p>Last month, I presented some techniques, chord forms and licks that are commonly used for playing slide in open G tuning, which is sometimes referred to as “Spanish tuning” or “happy tuning.” </p> <p>This month, I’d like to offer a further investigation into the musical possibilities that open G tuning offers for slide playing. </p> <p>All of the licks and riffs will work great whether you are playing them on a resonator, acoustic or electric guitar, and whether you prefer a glass, metal or ceramic slide. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3385576323001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3385576323001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-further-exploration-playing-slide-open-g-tuning#comments Andy Aledort In Deep May 2014 In Deep with Andy Aledort News Lessons Magazine Mon, 07 Apr 2014 15:06:50 +0000 Andy Aledort http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20793