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Marty Friedman

Guitar World Member For: 2 years 35 weeks
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Full Shred with Marty Friedman: How to Develop Melodic Ideas with Interesting Twists

If I had to pick one thing I place highest in importance when it comes to guitar playing, it would be originality. I am not a fan of the tried-and-true cliché licks that have been used forever by so many guitarists. To me, it’s simply a cop out to mimic fast phrases or standard rock licks that we’ve all heard a million times before. I think it’s much more interesting and appealing to strive for originality through spontaneity and invention.

Full Shred with Marty Friedman: Relocating Familiar Melodic Ideas and Patterns Up and Down the Fretboard

These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the December 2014 issue of Guitar World. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the Guitar World Online Store.

Full Shred with Marty Friedman: Using String-Bending and Vibrato to Personalize a Melody

Two of the most essential techniques for all aspiring guitarists to master are string bending and vibrato. The electric guitar affords us the opportunity to express musical statements that can evoke and rival the sound and qualities of the human voice, with string-bending and vibrato techniques as the primary elements necessary to achieve vocal-like sounds and phrasing.

Full Shred with Marty Friedman: Using Various Articulation Techniques to Expressively Interpret a Melody — Video

These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the September 2014 issue of Guitar World. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the Guitar World Online Store.

Full Shred with Marty Friedman: Finding Your Path to Musical Individuality — Video

Though it may be easier to learn other people’s solos—which is fine if that’s the goal you’re pursuing—I believe it’s much more rewarding to go out on a limb and take some musical chances, just to see what new and different sounds you can discover in the pursuit of forming a style that you can eventually call your own.

Full Shred with Marty Friedman: How to Play Fast and Musical Arpeggio-Based Licks Without Sweep Picking

I’ve often been associated with players that use specific picking techniques, such as sweep picking, economy picking, hybrid picking and so on. In truth, I have no idea what any of these terms mean. Sweep picking does not appeal to me at all.

To my ears, it’s very unmusical. In my music, you will hear some insane, fast arpeggio-based lines, but it’s never simply straight up and down through the arpeggios, the way sweep picking usually is performed. This month, I’d like to demonstrate some cool ways you can achieve the effect of fast arpeggio-based sounds while avoiding the predictability of standard sweep-picking licks.

Full Shred with Marty Friedman: Taking Licks You’ve Learned from Others and Making Them Your Own

Hello, and welcome to my new GW instructional column. It’s good to be back! I hope the ideas and concepts I present here in the coming months will give you inspiration and insight into your own path to musical creativity. The most important thing I can say is that you should always strive to make your own distinct musical statement with what you play on the guitar.

Betcha Can't Play This: Marty Friedman Explores the Phrygian-Dominant Mode

I start with a C power chord as a pickup to the first bar. Sometimes I like to include another fifth below the chord itself. This brings out overtones that give the illusion of a lower root note, especially when you’re using heavy distortion. Even though the tempo marking is shown as "Freely," the lick is meant to be played as fast as you can.

Full Shred: No Pain, No Strain — Warming Up to Avoid Hand Injuries

Whenever you're going to do any form of strenuous exercise, you should always warm up first if you want to avoid possibly hurting yourself. If you were playing baseball you wouldn't just get up there and start hitting balls with all your strength -- you'd swing the bat a few times before you tried to hit a home run. So I believe it's important to warm up before you do pretty much anything on the guitar, be it recording, playing a gig or rehearsing.