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Dave Davidson

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Thrash Course with Dave Davidson: Moving Freely Throughout Different Tonal Centers

Last month, I discussed a few of the ways in which I like to utilize odd and mixed meters, as well as alternating between straight 4/4 time and odd meters, as compositional tools in writing music with Revocation.

Thrash Course with Dave Davidson: Exploiting Odd-Time Meters, and How I Play “Madness Opus” and “Witch Trials”

A favorite compositional technique of mine in the songs I record and perform with Revocation is to incorporate the use of odd and shifting meters in the writing of primary riffs. Another cool approach I often take is to combine straight 4/4 time with odd meters to create some interesting and unique amalgamations.

Thrash Course with Dave Davidson: Using Mixed Meters, and How to Play “Labyrinth of Eyes,” Part 2 — Video

Last month, I detailed several of the primary riffs in the Revocation song “Labyrinth of Eyes,” from our 2014 album, Deathless. Those riffs, as you recall, are played in 12/8 meter.

This month, I’d like to show you the song’s remaining primary riffs, which introduce an unexpected twist by shifting to two bars of 3/4 followed by a bar of 2/4.

Thrash Course with Dave Davidson: How I Employ Dissonance in "Labyrinth of Eyes" — Video

This month, I’d like to demonstrate the primary riffs in the Revocation song “Labyrinth of Eyes,” from our 2014 album, Deathless.

Thrash Course with Dave Davidson: More Melodic Options for Combining Sweeping and Tapping Techniques — Video

Last month, I demonstrated some effective ways to incorporate the techniques of sweep picking and fretboard tapping into a single arpeggio-based run.

As you recall, we started out using minor seven arpeggios and then mutated them into minor seven flat-five.

This month, I’d like to apply these same concepts to other arpeggio types, or qualities, namely major seven, major seven sharp 11 and major seven sharp five.

Thrash Course with Dave Davidson: Combining Two Popular Arpeggio-Playing Techniques to Create Fluid Phrases

Two techniques most rock lead guitarists are familiar with are sweep picking and fretboard tapping, both of which are often employed to perform arpeggios.

Sweeping, like strumming, involves quickly dragging the pick across several adjacent strings in a single downward or upward motion, except when sweeping you try to mute and silence each string with the fret hand immediately after picking it, as opposed to holding down a shape and allowing the notes to ring together like a chord.

Tapping entails using either a pick-hand fingertip or the edge of a pick to hammer-on a note on a single string at a specific fret. In this column, I’d like to demonstrate ways to combine the two techniques to create great sounding licks that can easily be moved around the fretboard.

Thrash Course with Dave Davidson: Applying the Diminished Scale to the Pre-Chorus and Chorus of “Deathless”

Last month, I introduced the two different primary forms of the diminished scale, which I use as the basis for the riffs heard on the title track of the latest Revocation release, Deathless. This month, I’d like to go over the song’s pre-chorus and chorus sections.`

Thrash Course with Dave Davidson: Investigating Two Forms of the Diminished Scale

These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the Holiday 2014 issue of Guitar World. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the Guitar World Online Store.

Thrash Course with Dave Davidson: Using Minor-Seven Flat-Five Chords in Metal, Part 2

These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the September 2014 issue of Guitar World. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the Guitar World Online Store.

Thrash Course with Dave Davidson: Using Minor-Seven Flat-Five Chords in Metal

One of my prime objectives when writing music for my band Revocation is to try to push the envelope and come up with sounds, ideas, chord patterns, progressions and riffs that have been rarely explored within the thrash metal genre.

A good way to do this is to use seventh chords, which are rarely heard in metal. This month, I’d like to demonstrate a few cool ways one can use one particularly cool- and tense-sounding seventh chord in heavy, thrash-style riffs.