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Adrian Galysh

Articles from Adrian Galysh

Increase Picking-Hand Strength and Produce Great-Sounding Sequences

I love playing guitar. I love practicing guitar. Some people find practicing scales and exercises boring; I find it meditative.However, it’s good to mix things up a bit.In this lesson, I’m going to show you a pentatonic scale workout that helps you get the five positions of the pentatonic scale memorized and under your fingers, increases left-hand strength, delivers some great-sounding... …

How to Seamlessly Play 7th Chord Arpeggios Over Three Octaves

In this lesson, we are going to expand on my previous lesson—"How to Seamlessly Play Arpeggios Over Three Octaves"—and add the chord’s 7th degree to the arpeggios. Not only will this lesson help expand your musical vocabulary, but it may also change how you visualize and navigate the fretboard.The six strings of the guitar can be looked at as three pairs of strings. The first pair being the low... …

How to Seamlessly Play Arpeggios Over Three Octaves

In this lesson we are going to take simple three note arpeggios and learn how to play them seamlessly over three octaves. Not only will this lesson help expand your musical vocabulary, but it may also change how you understand, visualize, and navigate the fretboard.The six strings of the guitar can be looked at as three pairs of strings. The first pair being the low E and A strings. The second... …

Cooking with the Blues: How to Spice Up Your Solos

The blues' most common variation is the 12-bar variety. A basic 12-bar blues includes three chords, often referred to by number, which describes where the chord is found by scale degree. These three chords are the I, IV and V. While it is common to "play over the changes" of these chords, in this lesson we'll discuss some basic scales that inform my vocabulary when simply playing over the key... …

How to Get More Mileage Out of Your Scales

If you've become comfortable with my previous lesson, "Diatonic Scale Workout: Increase Picking Strength and Produce Great-Sounding Sequences," and feel like you have all seven three-note-per-string positions under your fingers, we'll take it a step further. Here are some interesting but simple single-string three-note patterns you can apply to those same sequences. ... …

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