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You'll never be as metal as the sound of this harp run through a distortion pedal

Playing word association with a harp is fairly easy: angels, beauty, serenity, heavenliness... You certainly don't think of the sonic grit, grime and nastiness produced by your average distortion pedal.

Don't mention that to harpist Emily Hopkins, though, for she recently decided to find the grimiest, heaviest distortion pedal she could get her hands on – which, according to Hopkins, was the Electrofoods Nepenthes – and run two of her harps through it, because why not?

We know what you're thinking, and the answer is yes, it absolutely djents. 

Hopkins first runs a smaller, lever harp through the Nepenthes, producing titanic doom tones that might even leave Tony Iommi jealous. Next, she couples the lever harp and Nepenthes with the superb Walrus Fathom reverb pedal, producing some spooky post-rock-esque sounds that'll be sure to send shivers down your spine.

After producing some more post-apocalyptic eeriness with the lever harp, the Nepenthes and the Flower Pedals Dandelion tremolo, Hopkins finishes the proceedings by using the Nepenthes with her massive pedal harp, and a Fairfield Circuitry Shallow Water K-Field Modulator, creating a piece that would feel right at home in any horror movie soundtrack.

In the mood for falling down a YouTube rabbit hole, after that then? Well, you're in luck. Hopkins has an entire playlist of more than 85 harp pedal demos on her YouTube channel. Aside from their novelty, Hopkins' creativity on this ancient instrument brings out unique quirks in each pedal that you may not hear on your average guitar-based pedal demo.

Check out Hopkins' YouTube channel for more.

Jackson Maxwell

Jackson is an Associate Editor at guitarworld.com. He’s been writing and editing stories about new gear, technique and guitar-driven music both old and new since 2014, and has also written extensively on the same topics for Guitar Player. Elsewhere, his album reviews and essays have appeared in Louder and Unrecorded. Though open to music of all kinds, his greatest love has always been indie, and everything that falls under its massive umbrella. To that end, you can find him on Twitter crowing about whatever great new guitar band you need to drop everything to hear right now.