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Pigtronix Constellator Modulated Analog Delay review

Modestly proportioned with expansive sounds, the Constellator is out of this world

Constellator, Space Rip and Moon Pool
(Image: © Pigtronix)

Our Verdict

An excellent way to easily add real analogue delay to your ’board.

For

  • BBD-driven repeats.
  • Up to 600ms of analog delay.
  • Compact form.
  • Versatile.

Against

  • Nothing of note.

The Constellator is an analogue delay pedal with two MN3005 BBD chips (modern versions of those found in some vintage pedals) allowing up to 600ms of delay time, and it has the standard triumverate of Time, Mix and Repeats knobs but also a control for adding modulation. 

Two modulation choices are toggled by the Feel button, which adjusts parameters simultaneously for a different flavour – basically chorus or vibrato. Between the two, there’s plenty to explore whether it’s subliminal shading, tape echo-style wobble on the repeats or full-on rich modulated delay. 

Those repeats are everything you’d expect of an analogue delay, melting off and degrading into the distance and going into self-oscillation if desired. From metallic ambience through vintage slapback to Edge-style rhythmic repeats and longer spacey echoes, there’s plenty here.   

Specs

  • PRICE: $179 / £165
  • ORIGIN: China
  • TYPE: Analogue delay pedal
  • FEATURES: Buffered bypass
  • CONTROLS: Time, Mix, Mod, Repeats, Feel, Bypass footswitch
  • CONNECTIONS: Standard input, standard output
  • POWER: 9V DC adaptor (not supplied)
  • DIMENSIONS: 43 (w) x 93 (d) x 45mm (h)
  • CONTACT: Pigtronix

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Trevor Curwen has played guitar for several decades – he's also mimed it on the UK's Top of the Pops. Much of his working life, though, has been spent behind the mixing desk, during which time he has built up a solid collection of the guitars, amps and pedals needed to cover just about any studio session. He writes pedal reviews for Guitarist and has contributed to Total Guitar, MusicRadar and Future Music among others.