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TWA slims down and adds more sonic versatility to an old favorite with the Triskelion Mk. III Harmonic Energizer pedal

When TWA first introduced the Triskelion pedal – the company's recreation of the legendary (and extremely expensive) '70s-era Systech Harmonic Energizer – in 2010, it immediately became a favorite of the likes of Dweezil Zappa, who used it to replicate some of the Systech-aided tones of his father, Frank.

Five years later, TWA – on top of a handful of other tweaks – trimmed the pedal down in size, and the Triskelion Mk. II was born.

Now, the company has further slimmed down the pedal, and combined what it sees as the best aspects of the first two Triskelions to create the Triskelion Mk. III Harmonic Energizer.

Housed in a Hammond 1590B chassis, the pedal – a parametric midrange filter with tweakable peaks and an "obscene" amount of gain – aims to capture the aggressive sounds of the original Systech, with a greater range of high frequencies and expression control over the filter sweep.

On the Mk. III, the original Triskelion's Variant Mass Boost switch – which adds a piercing upper range – has been reinstated, as have some of the lower frequencies that could be found on the original but not on the Mk. II version. The Mk. III, however, does retain the Mk. II pedal's improved noise floor.

TWA's new Triskellion Mk. III Harmonic Energizer

(Image credit: Godlyke)

A top-mounted, on/off mini-switch, meanwhile, is one of two ways to dial in gain, with the other method being via an external footswitch connected to the pedal's side-mounted mini-phone jack. 

The pedal also boasts another mini-phone jack for those who want to connect an expression pedal to control the frequency sweep of the filter.

The Triskelion Mk. III Harmonic Energizer can be preordered now for $229, with a release scheduled for late July. 

Visit TWA for more info on the pedal.

Jackson Maxwell

Jackson is an Associate Editor at guitarworld.com. He’s been writing and editing stories about new gear, technique and guitar-driven music both old and new since 2014, and has also written extensively on the same topics for Guitar Player. Elsewhere, his album reviews and essays have appeared in Louder and Unrecorded. Though open to music of all kinds, his greatest love has always been indie, and everything that falls under its massive umbrella. To that end, you can find him on Twitter crowing about whatever great new guitar band you need to drop everything to hear right now.