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Fender Unveils New Albert Hammond Jr. Stratocaster

Fender Albert Hammond Jr. Stratocaster

Fender Albert Hammond Jr. Stratocaster (Image credit: Fender)

Fender has unveiled its new Albert Hammond Jr. Stratocaster.

The Strokes guitarist's signature model features his own customized pickups switching: pickup switch position four activates the neck and bridge pickups in tandem, while positions one and three are reversed from the traditional layout. Hammond’s signature graces the back of the large Seventies-style headstock, while other Seventies-inspired features include a bullet truss rod nut, a 3-bolt “F”-stamped neck plate with period-correct Micro-Tilt adjustment and a Seventies-era logo.

The ceramic single-coil Stratocaster pickups are custom-designed to match Hammond’s brash, visceral playing style. The traditional master volume and two tone controls are easily at hand, one for the neck pickup and one for the middle pickup. The guitar also features a vintage-style 6-saddle synchronized tremolo bridge, a “Modern C”-shaped maple neck and a 7.25”-radius rosewood fingerboard with 21 medium-jumbo frets.

Other features include vintage-style strap buttons, dual-wing string trees, a vintage-style tremolo arm, chrome hardware, a 3-ply Parchment pickguard and a synthetic bone nut.

The Fender Albert Hammond Jr. Stratocaster will be available in October for $874.99.

For more on the guitar, head on over to fender.com (opens in new tab).

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Jackson is an Associate Editor at GuitarWorld.com. He’s been writing and editing stories about new gear, technique and guitar-driven music both old and new since 2014, and has also written extensively on the same topics for Guitar Player (opens in new tab). Elsewhere, his album reviews and essays have appeared in Louder (opens in new tab) and Unrecorded (opens in new tab). Though open to music of all kinds, his greatest love has always been indie, and everything that falls under its massive umbrella. To that end, you can find him on Twitter crowing about whatever great new guitar band you need to drop everything to hear right now.