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Behringer endeavors to emulate Mu-Tron's classic octave circuit with the faithfully spec’d Octave Divider

Behringer Octave Divider
(Image credit: Behringer)

Behringer has unveiled the Octave Divider, which it claims to be a faithfully spec’d clone of Mu-Tron’s own ‘70s-era rare octave modulation pedal.

For starters, the clone is – like most of Behringer’s effects pedal lineup – impressively cheap in comparison to the Mu-Tron: it will set you back $99, while original Octave Dividers can go for upwards of four figures – that is, if you can locate one.

Suitable for electric guitars, bass guitars and keyboards, Behringer’s more affordable Octave Divider sets its sights on supplying genuine Mu-Tron-style tones in the form of “thunderous sub-octave growl”.

A quick visual appraisal will tell you all you need to know about Behringer’s neat new offering. Don’t worry, you’re not seeing double: the control layout is in fact a like-for-like replica of the original Mu-Tron, presented in an ever-so-slightly more streamlined package.

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Behringer Octave Divider

(Image credit: Behringer)
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Behringer Octave Divider

(Image credit: Behringer)
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Behringer Octave Divider

(Image credit: Behringer)

Two knobs, Mix and Tone, line up alongside three switches for Power, Ringer and Stabilize. While the Ringer function places greater emphasis on upper harmonics, the Stabilize parameter is said to improve note tracking with monophonic signal sources. And you already know what Power does.

There are two switches on the Octave Divider – Effect and Bass Only – the first of which engages the pedal. The second, meanwhile, cuts your dry sound completely, leaving you with just the saturated, sub-octave-laden signal.

So, it looks the same, but does it sound the same? Well, check out the video below to see for yourself. Our two cents is that, from the brief glimpse we get, it does a pretty darn good job for the price point.

In terms of connectivity, the pedal features a jack instrument Input, as well as Amp and Aux outputs. It should come as no surprise, either, that these three connections are also found on the original Mu-Tron.

Behringer’s Octave Divider is available now for $99.

To find out more, head over to Behringer.

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Matt is a News Writer, writing for Guitar World, Guitarist and Total Guitar. He has a Masters in the guitar, a degree in history, and has spent the last 16 years playing everything from blues and jazz to indie and pop. When he’s not combining his passion for writing and music during his day job, Matt records for a number of UK-based bands and songwriters as a session musician.