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Epiphone unveils made-in-USA Casino

Epiphone Casino (USA Collection)
(Image credit: Epiphone)

Way back at NAMM 2020, the big story was Epiphone’s Inspired by Gibson range, which brought classic Gibson models down to Epiphone price points. But alongside that series, a number of Epiphone models were revealed to be receiving USA-made treatments, chief among them the Texan acoustic and Casino archtop.

Now, for 2021, Epiphone has officially unveiled a made-in-USA version of the hollowbody beloved by The Beatles.

As you’d expect, the USA Collection model has a number of specs that elevate it above the regular Epi version. Chief among these is a pair of dogear Gibson USA P-90s, which feature vintage, braided two-conductor wiring and wax potting to cut down on feedback. Those pickups are hand-wired to Orange Drop capacitors.

The guitar’s three-ply maple and poplar body features quarter-sawn spruce bracing and cream binding, and is finished in nitrocellulose, with a choice of Vintage Sunburst (with black P-90s) or Royal Tan (with nickel P-90s).

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Epiphone Casino (USA Collection)

Epiphone Casino (USA Collection) in Royal Tan (Image credit: Epiphone)
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Epiphone Casino (USA Collection)

Epiphone Casino (USA Collection) in Vintage Sunburst (Image credit: Epiphone)

A solid mahogany neck features a rounded C profile, topped off with a 12”-radius Indian rosewood fingerboard, equipped with a Graph Tech nut.

Finally, a Thinline Trapeze tailpiece, ABR-1 bridge and Vintage Deluxe tuning machines round off the spec, accompanied by the trademark white pickguard with Epiphone logo.

Of course, those upgrades and USA build come at a price – $2,699, to be precise. But for die-hard Beatles, Kinks and Paul Weller fans, this is as close as you're likely to get to the original '60s-era look and build – especially given a rumored Paul McCartney Casino never came to fruition.

For more info, head over to Epiphone.

Michael Astley-Brown

Mike is Digital Editor-in-Chief of Guitar World, having spent nine storied years contributing to guitar journalism and a decade-and-a-half performing in bands of variable genre (and quality). He has written and edited for MusicRadar, Total Guitar and Guitarist, and makes prog-ish instrumental rock under the nom de plume Maebe.