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This $89 cab sim pedal could be the cheapest way to get impulse responses on your pedalboard

Flamma FS07 cab sim
(Image credit: Flamma Innovation/YouTube)

Impulse responses are already de rigueur for recording electric guitars, and as live music returns, tone-savvy pedalboarders could find themselves calling upon cab sims for consistent sounds night after night. We’re seeing more IR-equipped pedal options hit the market every month, but Chinese pedal co Flamma has launched the cheapest yet.

The FS07 Cab Simulation pedal costs $88, and comes with 11 onboard cab sims. We’ve got no idea whether those are any good, but there are seven slots to fill with your favorite third-party IRs (two per slot), and that’s the clincher here.

Flamma FS07 cab sim

(Image credit: Flamma)

It’s also packing mono or stereo outputs – although neither are XLR – as well as a dual-function footswitch that can be used to switch the pedal on or off, or cycle through the seven preset slots. You can set different IRs for each output, too, which could potentially make for a massive live stereo guitar sound.

Further IR tweaking comes via onboard controls for level, low cut and high cut, as well as latency – which, surely, you’d want set to 0 at all times.

As for loading third-party IRs, Flamma offers its own Windows/Mac editor software to manage presets, accessed via a USB port on the rear of the pedal’s quite nice-looking metal chassis. A USB Micro-B cable is included.

Factory cabs range from Fender Deluxe 1x12s to Vox AC30 2x12s, and Mesa/Boogie, Diezel and EVH 4x12s. Surprisingly, there are no Marshall options here.

Mooer’s affordable IR-capable mini offerings still have the edge when it comes to pedalboard real estate, but Flamma has managed to undercut those prices by over $50, with stereo outputs thrown in.

The FS07 is available direct from Flamma and – you guessed it – Amazon.

Michael Astley-Brown

Mike is Editor-in-Chief of GuitarWorld.com, in addition to being an offset fiend and recovering pedal addict. He has a master's degree in journalism, and has spent the past decade writing and editing for guitar publications including MusicRadar, Total Guitar and Guitarist, as well as a decade-and-a-half performing in bands of variable genre (and quality). In his free time, you'll find him making progressive instrumental rock under the nom de plume Maebe.