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An enterprising Lego fan has built a pedalboard to go with the Lego Fender Stratocaster

Lego pedalboard
(Image credit: rubbermaker_lego/Instagram)

Back in September, Fender launched the eagerly anticipated Lego Stratocaster, a 1,074-piece guitar and amp kit that replicates the iconic electric guitar in exhaustive detail. Yet although the set comes with a two-button footswitch for its included Princeton Reverb, some Lego fans were left wanting more – enter the Lego pedalboard.

Masterminded by kit designer Steve Marsh (aka rubblemaker_lego), the Lego pedalboard is composed of 399 parts, and features an Electro-Harmonix Big Muff Pi, Boss PH-1 Phaser, CE-2 Chorus, TU-3 Chromatic Tuner, Pro Co RAT and Dunlop Cry Baby.

Thankfully, 164-page PDF instructions are available from Rebrickable to guide you through the build. Oh, and for anyone wondering what to use for patch cables, minifigure whips work nicely, apparently.

On his inspiration for the build, Marsh commented on Instagram, “I recently bought the LEGO Fender Strat set. It’s a great set but it was sorely lacking something. It came with just one footswitch and, having played guitar and bass in about 25 different bands, I wasn’t going to settle for that.”

Exemplary work. And, of course, the beauty of Lego’s endlessly reconfigurable format means that if you’re not a fan of the effects placement, you can change that over in a flash, no Velcro required.

The build has won plenty of plaudits from across the web, most notably from Boss, who commented, “You are a legend! Great selection of pedals. @built_with_lego @lego - we’re ready when you are…”

Could we see a fully loaded Boss BCB-90X Lego pedalboard this time next year? Here’s hoping…

Michael Astley-Brown

Mike is Editor-in-Chief of GuitarWorld.com, in addition to being an offset fiend and recovering pedal addict. He has a master's degree in journalism, and has spent the past decade writing and editing for guitar publications including MusicRadar, Total Guitar and Guitarist, as well as a decade-and-a-half performing in bands of variable genre (and quality). In his free time, you'll find him making progressive instrumental rock under the nom de plume Maebe.