Dean expands its Exile X line of guitars with new, Satin White-finished model

Dean Exile X Floyd Satin White
(Image credit: Dean Guitars)

Dean has expanded its Exile X line of electric guitars with a new, Satin White-finished model.   

A twin to the Exile X Floyd Black Satin, the Exile X Floyd Satin White was designed as a shred-friendly machine for the budget-minded guitarist.

The guitar features an eastern mahogany body and a bolt-on, C-shaped maple neck that sports a 25 1/2", 16" radius Indian rosewood fretboard with 24 jumbo frets and pearloid dot inlays, plus a dual-action truss rod. A high-access neck-through-heel joint, meanwhile, makes for easier upper-fret access.

Sounds on the axe, meanwhile, come by way of a pair of DMT Design Zebra pickups, controlled by individual volume and tone knobs, and a three-way blade pickup switch.

As for hardware, the Satin White Exile X features a Floyd Rose FR20 Tremolo system, 1 11/16-inch wide Floyd Rose R3 nut, and black sealed die-cast tuners. Hardware is finished in black all around, providing a nice contrast to the snow-white finish.

The Dean Exile X Floyd Satin White is built in India, and is available now for $429.

It's the first new electric model from the company since August, when – after a years-long legal battle with Gibson – a court ruled that Dean must cease production and marketing of its Luna Athena 501, Gran Sport, V and Z models, and any guitars using or advertised with the word “Hummingbird."

For more info on the guitar, visit Dean (opens in new tab).

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Jackson is an Associate Editor at GuitarWorld.com. He’s been writing and editing stories about new gear, technique and guitar-driven music both old and new since 2014, and has also written extensively on the same topics for Guitar Player (opens in new tab). Elsewhere, his album reviews and essays have appeared in Louder (opens in new tab) and Unrecorded (opens in new tab). Though open to music of all kinds, his greatest love has always been indie, and everything that falls under its massive umbrella. To that end, you can find him on Twitter crowing about whatever great new guitar band you need to drop everything to hear right now.