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Add some trippiness to your tone with Death By Audio's new Speed Tripper delay pedal

Death by Audio's new Speed Tripper pedal
(Image credit: Death by Audio)

New York City-based pedal maker Death by Audio has unveiled its latest delay pedal, a decidedly trippy, innovative creation called the Speed Tripper.

Made in collaboration with Austin, Texas's Levitation festival – the company's second collaboration with Levitation, following 2019's Phosphene Scream pedal – the Speed Tripper is a delay with an optical phaser that users can feed into the feedback path of the delay circuit for ultra-psychedelic sounds.

A slim, pedalboard-friendly unit, the Speed Tripper boasts a control layout featuring Delay Time, Feedback, Tripper Speed and Intensity knobs.

The Delay Time knob, of course, controls the length of the delay, which ranges from from 30ms to 1100ms. Longer delay times, according to Death by Audio, will degrade the quality of the repeats, and introduce noise and "other hellish accompaniment" into your signal. Perfect for spooky season, eh?

The Tripper Speed knob adjusts the speed of the LFO and controls the phase shifting. Keeping it down is said to give users "oceanic movement," while turning it up will produce more warbly sounds. 

The Feedback knob, naturally, controls the amount of feedback from the delay output back to the input, and is highly interactive with the Intensity knob, which adjusts the level of delay being sent through the phase network. 

Keeping the Intensity knob down will leave your signal unphased, so to speak, while turning it to the right will bring full phase into the signal. In addition to feedback, adjusting the Intensity can also affect oscillation.

Finally, an internal Blend control sets the volume of the delayed signal relative to the clean signal.

The Death By Audio Speed Tripper pedal runs on 9VDC power, and is available for pre-order now – in a limited run of, what else, 666 units – for $269.

For more info, stop by Death by Audio.

Jackson Maxwell

Jackson is an Associate Editor at guitarworld.com. He’s been writing and editing stories about new gear, technique and guitar-driven music both old and new since 2014, and has also written extensively on the same topics for Guitar Player. Elsewhere, his album reviews and essays have appeared in Louder and Unrecorded. Though open to music of all kinds, his greatest love has always been indie, and everything that falls under its massive umbrella. To that end, you can find him on Twitter crowing about whatever great new guitar band you need to drop everything to hear right now.