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Ibanez extends its mini-pedal lineup with the launch of new Phaser and Booster Mini

Ibanez Phaser and Booster Mini
(Image credit: Ibanez)

NAMM 2021 isn't taking place in the physical realm this year, but you'll find all the hottest January gear launches in our guide to the biggest guitar, amp and pedal releases of 2021 so far.

Out of all the mini pedals on the market, Ibanez’s range has struck perhaps the best balance between tone, features and bang for buck, so the addition of two new pedals to the series is welcome news indeed – meet the Phaser Mini and Booster Mini.

The all-analog Phaser Mini is notable for its switchable stages, which offer traditional four-stage sounds, as well as more dramatic six-stage swirls, accessed via a small side-mounted button.

There’s a full control set onboard, too, including Depth, Feedback and Speed knobs, while Ibanez promises the pedal retains dry signal clarity even at intense settings.

The Booster Mini, meanwhile, features controls for Bass, Treble and Level – with up to 24dB of boost – but the straightforward feature set belies hidden depths.

Turning Bass and Treble all the way up delivers a wide range boost with increased volume and presence, while different combinations of the EQ dials in a range of mid boosts.

What’s more, it’s packing a Japanese-built JRC MUSES 8820 op amp that promises to retain clarity even when pushing amps into high levels of overdrive.

Ibanez Phaser and Booster Mini

(Image credit: Ibanez)

Both pedals are made in Japan, feature true bypass switching and run off 9V power supplies.

The Phaser Mini and Booster Mini are available later this year for $119 and $99 respectively.

Head on over to Ibanez for more info.

It follows a wealth of new product announcements from the revered Japanese company, including a trio of new AZ models, 15 fresh RG designs, and new signature models for Paul Gilbert, Paul Waggoner and Martin Miller.

Michael Astley-Brown

Mike is Digital Editor-in-Chief of Guitar World, having spent nine storied years contributing to guitar journalism and a decade-and-a-half performing in bands of variable genre (and quality). He has written and edited for MusicRadar, Total Guitar and Guitarist, and makes prog-ish instrumental rock under the nom de plume Maebe.