Skip to main content

Paul McCartney reveals his teenage guitar amp in studio tour

Photo of LIVE 8 and Paul McCARTNEY, performing live onstage at Live 8.
(Image credit: Mick Hutson/Redferns)

Paul McCartney’s 1997 album, Flaming Pie, has just received the deluxe reissue treatment, and among the gems included with the new edition is an hour-long studio tour, in which Macca shows you round his home studio – and some very important gear.

Most notable among his collection is his very first guitar amp, the Elpico A55.

“This is my very first amp I ever had when I was 14, it was called an Elpico,” he says at 19:31 in the video below. “As you can see it is very ’50s – the design looks like a piece of ’50s furniture.

“Instead of putting guitars into it, it says Mic1, Mic2, Gramophone – anything but guitars, really.”

As a result, the amp produces a fuzzy tonality when used with electric guitars, which is best heard on The Kinks’ You Really Got Me – although Dave Davies cut his amp’s speaker with a razor blade for extra distortion.

The studio tour also showcases McCartney soloing on his custom Ernie Ball Music Man Silhouette models, which were equipped with custom pickups and produced for Macca and fellow guitarist Robbie McIntosh.

During a recent interview, McCartney revealed how Jimi Hendrix inspired him to buy his favorite electric guitar.

The Super Deluxe edition of Flaming Pie is out now in a number of physical formats.

Paul McCartney

(Image credit: Linda McCartney)

Thank you for reading 5 articles this month*

Join now for unlimited access

US pricing $3.99 per month or $39.00 per year

UK pricing £2.99 per month or £29.00 per year 

Europe pricing €3.49 per month or €34.00 per year

*Read 5 free articles per month without a subscription

Join now for unlimited access

Prices from £2.99/$3.99/€3.49

Mike is Editor-in-Chief of GuitarWorld.com, in addition to being an offset fiend and recovering pedal addict. He has a master's degree in journalism, and has spent the past decade writing and editing for guitar publications including MusicRadar, Total Guitar and Guitarist, as well as the best part of 20 years performing in bands of variable genre (and quality). In his free time, you'll find him making progressive instrumental rock under the nom de plume Maebe.