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Stephen Carpenter dons pirate face paint for new playthrough of Deftones’ Minerva

Minerva is one of Deftones' most memorable tracks, partly because of Stephen Carpenter's stellar seven-string guitar work and also the fact its accompanying music video was shot in an actual sandstorm.

Despite the killer visual results, late bassist Chi Cheng said in a 2005 interview with Blabbermouth that the shoot lasted “almost 24 hours”, and resulted in sand being blown into “just about every orifice you can imagine”. Drummer Abe Cunningham added that “it sucked”.

Yet 18 years on from the shoot, you'd think Carpenter still had some leftover sand in his eye, given the surprise patch and bandana face paint he dons for a new playthrough of the classic track, posted to Deftones' YouTube channel.

Naturally though, performing in the middle of a sandstorm tends to be a one-time thing, so Stef opts to forgo the elements and play the track indoors. The setting is far from tranquil sonically, however, when he starts digging into its abundance of enormous shoegazey seven-string passages.

Perhaps even more impressive than his playing is his monstrous rig, which, fueled by his signature ESP STEF-B7 baritone guitar, includes a wall of Sound City SC412 and SC212 cabs, and a plethora of rack units, including a Fractal Axe-Fx II, Marshall JMP-1, Rocktron Intellifex Multi-FX, a tray of stompboxes – including a Strymon BigSky and Timeline – and two Fryette Two/Fifty/Two power amps.

This is the latest in a string of recent playthroughs by Carpenter showcasing Deftones' back catalog. So far this year, the guitarist has offered up new performances of Ceremony, Needles and Pins and Be Quiet and Drive (Far Away), among many others over at Deftones' YouTube channel.

Sam Roche

Sam is a Staff Writer at Guitar World, also creating content for Total Guitar, Guitarist and Guitar Player. He has well over 15 years of guitar playing under his belt, as well as a degree in Music Technology (Mixing and Mastering). He's a metalhead through and through, but has a thorough appreciation for all genres of music. In his spare time, Sam creates point-of-view guitar lesson videos on YouTube under the name Sightline Guitar.