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Watch Stephen Carpenter tear through Deftones’ Ceremony in new guitar playthrough video

Deftones recently released the creepy, Leigh ’Saw’ Whannell-directed video for Ceremony, but the choice Ohms cut has also received a surprise guitar playthrough from Stephen Carpenter.

The newly posted, close-shot clip showcases Carpenter’s tight down-picked attack on a shell pink ESP signature guitar, which is equipped with Fishman Fluence humbuckers, a Floyd Rose locking tremolo and even a matching scrunchie fret wrap to mute noise above the nut.

While the model itself is an eight-string, much of the action takes place on the guitar’s seventh string, so the track isn’t out of bounds for baritone players and seven-stringers.

We also get a closer look into Stef’s current rig, including a Line 6 Helix – which is presumably providing the tones for the playthrough – while a mini-stack from Arizona company Foppstar Amplification sits in the corner, alongside a rack of guitars that features Carpenter’s latest nine-string squeeze.

And in case you were wondering what else Stef’s been using to conjure his wrecking-ball tones, the video’s credits give a shoutout to ESP Guitars, Fishman, Dunlop, Ernie Ball, Orange, Fryette Amplification, Line 6, ENGL, Rivera Amplification, & SYNERGY.

Ceremony was officially released last week, and follows Ohms and Genesis as singles from Deftones’ ninth record, Ohms, released in September 2020. You can watch the track’s full – and very unsettling – video below.

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Michael Astley-Brown
Michael Astley-Brown

Mike is Editor-in-Chief of GuitarWorld.com, in addition to being an offset fiend and recovering pedal addict. He has a master's degree in journalism, and has spent the past decade writing and editing for guitar publications including MusicRadar (opens in new tab), Total Guitar and Guitarist, as well as the best part of 20 years performing in bands of variable genre (and quality). In his free time, you'll find him making progressive instrumental rock under the nom de plume Maebe (opens in new tab).