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The War on Drugs' heartland rock influences shine on their shimmering new single, I Don't Live Here Anymore

The War on Drugs performing "I Don't Live Here Anymore" on an LA rooftop
(Image credit: The War On Drugs/YouTube)

Philly indie favorites The War on Drugs have released I Don't Live Here Anymore, the second single from their forthcoming album of the same name, following Living Proof.

A meticulous windswept epic, I Don't Live Here Anymore is a perfect primer for those new to the band. The heartland rock influences that permeate the rest of the group's catalog loom large in the song's bubbling synth undertones, booming drums, triumphant electric guitar leads, and the reach-for-the-nosebleeds chorus, which features some vocal assistance from special guests Lucius.

Armed with a couple of his favorite Fender offset guitars, the band's frontman and guitarist, Adam Granduciel, vividly explores anxiety, nostalgia and romantic longing in the song's lyrics, while referencing both passively and literally one of his other major influences, Bob Dylan. 

You can check out the song's beautifully-shot music video, directed by Emmett Malloy, below.

I Don't Live Here Anymore follows 2017's A Deeper Understanding, which netted the group Best Rock Album at the 2018 Grammy Awards, and 2020's Live Drugs.

Out October 29 on Atlantic Records, the album was co-produced by Granduciel with Shawn Everett, and took three years of recording in seven studios to make. You can check out the record's cover art and track list below.

To preorder I Don't Live Here Anymore, stop by The War on Drugs' website.

The War On Drugs I Don't Live Here Anymore album cover

(Image credit: Press)

The War On Drugs – I Don't Live Here Anymore:

  1. Living Proof
  2. Harmonia's Dream
  3. Change
  4. I Don't Wanna Wait
  5. Victim
  6. I Don't Live Here Anymore
  7. Old Skin
  8. Wasted
  9. Rings Around My Father's Eyes
  10. Occasional Rain
Jackson Maxwell

Jackson is an Associate Editor at guitarworld.com. He’s been writing and editing stories about new gear, technique and guitar-driven music both old and new since 2014, and has also written extensively on the same topics for Guitar Player. Elsewhere, his album reviews and essays have appeared in Louder and Unrecorded. Though open to music of all kinds, his greatest love has always been indie, and everything that falls under its massive umbrella. To that end, you can find him on Twitter crowing about whatever great new guitar band you need to drop everything to hear right now.