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Jimmy Brown

Articles about Jimmy Brown

Adding Tension to the Minor Jazz-Blues Progression

Continuing our exploration of the minor jazz-blues progression I introduced last month, I’d like to now show you some cool variations on it that are sometimes used by jazz musicians and feature added chord changes and spicier harmony and voice-leading. ... …

The Minor Jazz-Blues Progression

A favorite progression of mine, and many jazz musicians, to solo over is what’s known as the minor jazz-blues progression, featured on such jazz classics as John Coltrane’s “Mr. PC.” and “Equinox,” “Stolen Moments” by Oliver Nelson and “Footprints” by Wayne Shorter, as well as, for those old enough to remember, the original “Spiderman Theme Song” from the late-Sixties animated TV series and, in... …

Double-Time Soloing Over a Laid-Back Groove 

Continuing our exploration of jazz-blues, in this lesson, I present an example of how to craft a solo over a swing-eighths feel played at a moderately slow, laid-back tempo and tastefully shift into a higher rhythmic gear, using what jazz musicians refer to as a “double-time groove,” meaning predominantly 16th-note rhythms, as if you were playing eighth notes at twice the tempo. ... …

Colorful Jazz-Blues Chord Substitutions

Last month, I introduced the 12-bar jazz-blues progression, which is a more musically sophisticated cousin of the simpler “one-four-five” blues chord changes that most people are familiar with and serves as a more harmonically ambitious framework that jazz musicians almost universally prefer to solo over and use as a vehicle for improvising rich, colorful melodies that allude to interesting... …

How to Tune Your Guitar Using the "Fifth Fret Method"

Every guitarist should know how to tune his instrument the old-fashioned way—by ear—using unisons. In this Guitar Basics video, Guitar World Music Editor shows you how to do exactly that, using the "fifth fret method." For more of Jimmy's Guitar Basics videos, head here. …

The Intriguingly Exotic Sound of the C Lydian Hexatonic Scale

In the previous two String Theory columns (March and April 2015 issues), I introduced a pair of hexatonic (six-note) scales that are comprised of the same six notes and may be thought of as opposing sides of the same musical coin—the dark, serious-sounding E minor hexatonic (E F# G A B D) and its one useful mode, the beautifully bright D major hexatonic (D E F# G A B). ... …

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