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ElectroPhonic Model One Guitar Has Built-In Eight-Watt Stereo Amp and Effects

Electric guitars with built-in amps have been around for decades, offering buskers and on-the-go guitarists an all-in-one playing experience.

Typically, tone has not been a huge consideration in their creation. It’s more about convenience.

ElectroPhonic wants to put the focus where it really belongs by creating a self-amplified guitar that sounds great.

The company’s Model One combines an electric guitar made from traditional hardwoods with an eight-watt amp featuring stereophonic sound from dual paper-cone speakers. ElectroPhonic promises the guitar will offer “real amp tone—anytime, anywhere.”

In addition, the Model One features onboard effects, including delay and modulation, and a gain control for overdriven tones. The built-in amp even offers both U.S. and British high-gain tones.

The entire guitar is powered by lithium-ion batteries, making the Model One truly portable.

For more information, check out the video below and visit ElectroPhonicInnovations.com.

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Christopher Scapelliti
Christopher Scapelliti

Christopher Scapelliti is editor-in-chief of Guitar Player (opens in new tab) magazine, the world’s longest-running guitar magazine, founded in 1967. In his extensive career, he has authored in-depth interviews with such guitarists as Pete Townshend, Slash, Billy Corgan, Jack White, Elvis Costello and Todd Rundgren, and audio professionals including Beatles engineers Geoff Emerick and Ken Scott. He is the co-author of Guitar Aficionado: The Collections: The Most Famous, Rare, and Valuable Guitars in the World (opens in new tab), a founding editor of Guitar Aficionado magazine, and a former editor with Guitar WorldGuitar for the Practicing Musician and Maximum Guitar. Apart from guitars, he maintains a collection of more than 30 vintage analog synthesizers.