Firebird meets Jazzmaster with Fender’s new Spark-O-Matic model mashup

Fender Parallel Universe Volume II Spark-O-Matic Jazzmaster
(Image credit: Fender)

Fender is no stranger to injecting a little Les Paul DNA into its Parallel Universe Volume II models – just take a look at the Troublemaker Tele Deluxe and Uptown Strat – but its latest release looks to another Gibson model, the Firebird VII, for inspiration.

The Spark-O-Matic Jazzmaster teams classic Jazz appointments with a number of features derived from Gibson’s iconic ’bird.

For starters, it’s built using a three-piece body, composed of a mahogany core and chambered ash wings, rather than the one-piece alder body you’d usually find on a Jazzmaster. Here, it’s decked out in a 3-Color Sunburst – with no pickguard.

But it’s the pickups that really draw deep from the Gibson well: three chrome-covered Seymour Duncan SM-1N and SM-3B mini-humbuckers are onboard, adjusted via a five-way switch. Fender promises everything from “smooth growl to full-throttle roar” from the arrangement.

More typical Fender appointments come in the form of an American Pro Jazzmaster bridge and tailpiece, 18:1-ratio ClassicGear tuners, and a 9.5”-radius, 22-fret rosewood fingerboard on 25.5”-scale Deep C maple neck.

The Parallel Universe Volume II Spark-O-Matic Jazzmaster is available now for $1,999. Check out Fender.com (opens in new tab) for more info.

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Mike is Editor-in-Chief of GuitarWorld.com, in addition to being an offset fiend and recovering pedal addict. He has a master's degree in journalism, and has spent the past decade writing and editing for guitar publications including MusicRadar (opens in new tab), Total Guitar and Guitarist, as well as the best part of 20 years performing in bands of variable genre (and quality). In his free time, you'll find him making progressive instrumental rock under the nom de plume Maebe (opens in new tab).