The Smashing Pumpkins Streaming New Album Via iTunes

With only a week remaining until the official release of their new album, the Smashing Pumpkins are now streaming Oceania in its entirety via iTunes. You can listen here.

The band purposely opted to debut the album as a whole — to both fans and press — rather than releasing a single or music video in advance.

According to mainman Billy Corgan, the band "was dead set on making an album where every song was just as valuable as any other, ignoring the typical claptrap you hear about needing a single. The only way to make the case that every song on Oceania is worth hearing is to put your heart into the sequence as a cohesive whole."

Oceania was recorded in Chicago and marks the band's seventh full-length album — their first with guitarist Jeff Schroeder, drummer Mike Byrne and bassist/vocalist Nicole Florentino.

"I've been adamant in stressing that as a group, first and foremost, we are here to make new music together," Corgan said. "I'm proud to say that on Oceania I feel we've cut our own path forward. Jeff, Mike and Nicole have all made significant contributions to the tone and texture of Oceania, which is an album that is unlike any I've ever made. Yet at the same time I believe it upholds the same musical values I've always pushed for with The Pumpkins, be they progressive, emotional, epic, or restless."

The band's current lineup has recorded before together as part of the ongoing work-in-progress Teargarden By Kaleidoscope, a 44-song project of which Oceania is a part.

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Josh Hart is a former web producer and staff writer for Guitar World and Guitar Aficionado magazines (2010–2012). He has since pursued writing fiction under various pseudonyms while exploring the technical underpinnings of journalism, now serving as a senior software engineer for The Seattle Times.