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jimmybrown11

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Guitar 101: Learning Harmony Through Six-Note Hexatonic Scales, Part 1

Anyone who’s ever made an effort to learn some music theory knows that one of the biggest turn-offs is the sound of the major scale harmonized in triads (three-note chords). But before you dismiss the intellectual approach to learning music as being hopelessly tedious and uninspiring, realize that it doesn’t have to be that way.

Guitar 101 - Mastering Rhythm & Syncopation, Part 5: Quintuplets and Nightmare Licks

In part 4 we covered quarter-note triplets, 16th-note triplets and sextuplets and learned how to create tricked-out hemiola licks by taking a repeating note pattern and changing its rhythm so that the pattern begins, or "pops," on a different part of the beat each time it's repeated (rhythmic displacement). Now we're going to dive deeper into the rhythmic realm and explore a new subdivision, quintuplets-five evenly spaced notes per beat-and learn how to create psychedelic "nightmare" licks.

Guitar 101 - Mastering Rhythm & Syncopation, Part 4: More Fun with Triplets and Hemiola

In this lesson I'm going to show you more slick hemiola tricks that will help expand your phrasing vocabulary.

Guitar 101 - Mastering Rhythm & Syncopation, Part 3: Triplets and Hemiola

As promised at the end of our last lesson, we're now going to learn how to count, read and play triplets.

Quick Lick: Megadeth - "Hangar 18"

In the following video, Guitar World's Jimmy Brown shows you how to play the intro riff to "Hangar 18" from Megadeth's 1990 album, Rust In Peace.

Quick Lick: Slayer - "South of Heaven"

In the following video, Guitar World's Jimmy Brown shows you how to play the main riff to "South of Heaven," the title track to Slayer's 1988 classic.

Quick Lick: Metallica - "Sad But True"

In the following video, Guitar World's Jimmy Brown shows you how to play the main riff to "Sad But True" from Metallica's multi-platinum self-titled album from 1991.

Guitar 101: How To Play Fast, Part 3

Another relatively easy way to play fast is to use sweep picking, a technique in which the pick is dragged or "raked" across the strings, playing only one note per string. Sweep picking can be very useful for playing open-voiced arpeggios, as in FIGURE 16, and weird wide-interval licks, as in FIGURE 17, quickly and with minimal effort. When sweep-picking, be sure to mute each string with the left hand immediately after picking it to prevent the notes from ringing together and sounding like a strummed chord.

Guitar 101: How To Play Fast, Part 2

Now that you have some cool ideas for creating your own single-string licks, let’s look at some easy-to-execute speed licks that use two adjacent strings. FIGURE 8 is a Steve Morse-style ascending sextuplet run that climbs up the B and high E strings and finishes with a screaming bend. There are two good ways to play this lick: you can either pick every note for a machine gun-like staccato effect, or, for a "creamier," more legato sound, pick only the first and fourth notes of each sextuplet and use double hammer-ons to sound the remaining notes.