Skip to main content

Best DIY guitar kits 2022: self-assembly project guitars for every budget

Man building an electric guitar
(Image credit: Getty/RyanJLane)

What can make the bond between player and guitar even stronger? By building it yourself of course! Gone are the days where you’d have to source every individual part of the instrument yourself to craft your own axe – the market is now flush with some of the best DIY guitar kits that we’ve ever seen.

DIY guitar kits contain everything you need to build your own guitar from scratch, meaning that your new pride and joy was put together from your own blood, sweat and tears (hopefully not literally). Building your own instrument gives a massive sense of pride and achievement, making it even more fun to play once it’s completed. At a time when we're all feeling the cost of living, building your own guitar can represent a significant saving on buying a ready-built branded guitar.

You’ve also got the chance to really make it your own – from cutting the headstock shape how you want, to finishing it in your own colorway, there are loads of options when it comes to personalization of your new DIY axe. You also don’t need to be an expert luthier to put these DIY guitar kits together – there are various different build difficulties. Many of them come with the electronics already soldered so you can have more fun assembling it all.

You will need some tools, and a bit of know-how with a screwdriver won’t go amiss, but most of these kits will come with instructions, plus there are loads of helpful tutorial videos on YouTube.

For more guidance and our tips on building your own guitar, scroll to the bottom of this page. Some kits are only available in certain territories, so we've split the product round-up into US and UK section to help you find the best options where you live. 

Best DIY guitar kits: Guitar World Recommends

For budding luthiers in the US and Canada, we really like the Stew Mac 335 (opens in new tab). It might not be the easiest build, but the look of the wood and the finish of the body helps make for a really beautiful guitar that sounds great too.

For those across the pond in the UK and Europe, we’d have to go with the Wilkinson Modern S DIY guitar kit (opens in new tab). With some fantastic parts made by Trev Wilkinson, you can put together a guitar that will resonate, intonate and play well, plus the combination of a humbucker and two single coils makes for a really versatile set-up.

Best DIY guitar kits: Product guide (US)

Best DIY guitar kits: Stew Mac 335

(Image credit: Stew Mac)

1. Stew Mac 335

One of the best semi-hollow body DIY guitar kits around

Specifications

Price: $329
Difficulty level: Medium
Body wood: Maple top, mahogany back and sides
Pickups: HH

Reasons to buy

+
Test yourself with a semi-hollowbody
+
Great wood
+
Binding adds a touch of class

Reasons to avoid

-
Some might prefer a less fiddly build

Featuring a flame maple veneer top, which will look great – especially if you decide to add a burst finish – and mahogany back and sides, this DIY kit showcases some great electric guitar tonewoods that put it up there with some high quality semi-hollowbody guitars on the market. The body even has some really nice looking binding, and the F-holes are cut well. The center block is already in place in the body, and the routing for the pickups has been done.

The neck seems well made, with the frets seated properly and without many rough edges (how consistent they are from unit to unit, we can’t say). The nut is already in place, though replacing that is one thing that many players will opt to do afterwards. Once the neck is installed, it plays well, and the pickups sound great, delivering everything you’d want from a pair of humbuckers. 

The Stew Mac 335 offers a great building experience; it’s not the easiest, but the really hard parts have already been done, allowing you to focus on the more fun parts!

Best DIY guitar kits: BexGears Singlecut

(Image credit: BexGears )

2. BexGears Singlecut

Get stuck into your very own version of the timeless singlecut electric guitar

Specifications

Price: $160
Difficulty level: Easy
Body wood: Okoume with mahogany veneer
Pickups: HH

Reasons to buy

+
Nice and easy to build
+
Mahogany veneer looks great
+
Well priced

Reasons to avoid

-
Quality not as high as some others

This BexGears Les Paul-style guitar offers budding luthiers a traditional singlecut look and a fairly easy build. An okoume body and curved mahogany veneer top is a little different to the wood pairing we’re used to seeing on this style of guitar but it still looks and sounds just like it should, plus it helps keep costs down. 

All the tricky soldering has already been done with this DIY guitar kit, so you’re left with the job of clipping together all the pickups and pots etc. It’s still enough for you to feel like you’re really getting involved, but it does make it a touch easier. 

Once assembled, you’ve got yourself a great looking LP-style guitar fitted with a pair of beefy sounding humbuckers.  

Best DIY guitar kits: Martin Dreadnought Kit

(Image credit: Martin)

3. Martin Dreadnought Kit

Take on the iconic dreadnought with some help from Martin

Specifications

Price: $546
Difficulty level: Difficult
Body wood: East Indian rosewood back and sides, solid spruce top
Pickups: N/A

Reasons to buy

+
Makes for a great project
+
Premium tonewoods
+
Made by the biggest name in acoustic guitars

Reasons to avoid

-
Requires some skill and specialist tools

So this DIY acoustic guitar kit is a little trickier. All the parts of the classic and timeless Martin dreadnought guitar are shipped unassembled, meaning you’re responsible for glueing the body together, and the fretboard to the neck, though of course with this one you haven’t got any electronics to worry about. 

The body features premium tonewoods – an East Indian rosewood back and sides paired with a solid spruce top for that classic Martin sound. The dreadnought body shape lends a lovely, deep low end, as well as crisp, detailed highs. 

While this one might be a little more involved than other DIY kits, at the end of it, you’ll essentially have an unbranded Martin dreadnought guitar. 

Best DIY guitar kits: Solo EXK-1

(Image credit: Solo )

4. Solo EXK-1

Stand out from the crowd by exploring a different style of DIY guitar kit

Specifications

Price: $230
Difficulty level: Medium
Body wood: Mahogany
Pickups: HH

Reasons to buy

+
Undeniably cool body shape
+
Headstock cut to match
+
Decent pickups

Reasons to avoid

-
Too much for some?

Want to turn heads with your homemade guitar? Then check out this hard rock machine from Solo. It’s got a mahogany body and a mahogany neck with rosewood fingerboard, like most of the finished guitars you’d see with this body shape.

All the wood cutting and routing has already been done, and the headstock is already in the shape that you might normally associate with this style of guitar. All the wiring and electronics are included and will require some basic soldering to get it all up and running, but that’s all part of the fun!

Once assembled, you’ve got yourself a rock solid electric guitar fitted with a pair of humbuckers that will help match your tone to your look.

Best DIY guitar kits: Product guide (UK)

Best DIY guitar kits: Wilkinson Modern S

(Image credit: Wilkinson)

1. Wilkinson Modern S

A relatively easy DIY build, resulting in a quality and versatile guitar

Specifications

Price: £370
Difficulty level: Fairly easy
Body wood: 2-piece alder
Pickups: HSS

Reasons to buy

+
Quality parts and wood
+
Versatile pickup configuration 
+
Reliable name

Reasons to avoid

-
Pricier than others

Trevor Wilkinson is a pretty big name in the guitar world; his company makes a range of great hardware (a lot of which is featured on some premium guitars). They also make great sounding pickups and are one of the main forces behind Fret King and Vintage guitars. So off the bat you’ve got good quality parts included in this DIY guitar kit.

The body has been well carved, with all the curves and contours perfectly executed in the right place. The already fretted neck fits in the pocket of the body nicely making it a relatively easy build. 

The Modern S offers players the classic S-type guitar with a twist. An HSS pickup configuration offers more versatility, giving you the option of flicking from glassy and chimey tones, to bigger, chunkier humbucker sounds at the flick of a switch.

Best DIY guitar kits: Guitarworks Solo Cutaway

(Image credit: Guitarworks )

2. Guitarworks Solo Cutaway

Build your own classic T-style electric guitar without spending a fortune

Specifications

Price: £110
Difficulty level: Easy
Body wood: Ash with maple top
Pickups: SS

Reasons to buy

+
Solderless electronics
+
Iconic guitar
+
Nice maple top

Reasons to avoid

-
You’ll probably want to cut the headstock to shape

This T-style DIY guitar kit features solderless electronics, making it easier than ever to get the pickups and wiring installed in your newly built guitar. The neck pickup is already fitted into the body as well, saving you another fiddly job. The guitar is fairly easy to put together, the neck fits well into the body and the electronics clip into one another without any fuss. 

The body is lightweight and fairly resonant – not bad considering the price tag. The pickups deliver what you’d expect from this type of guitar. They might not be as detailed or dynamic as more expensive T-style pickups, but you wouldn’t really expect that at just over £100. Once put together, it holds its tuning well, and it’s possible to get the neck playing really nicely. 

All in all, whilst it might not be the most refined of instruments, the Guitarworks Solo Cutaway is definitely one of the best DIY guitar kits at the lower end of the price spectrum. 

Best DIY guitar kits: Harley Benton JA

(Image credit: Harley Benton)

3. Harley Benton JA

A cool offset DIY guitar kit with pair of punchy P-90s

Specifications

Price: £75
Difficulty level: Easy
Body wood: Rengas
Pickups: P-90s

Reasons to buy

+
Stand out with an offset
+
Affordable 
+
Tortoise scratchplate
+
No soldering required

Reasons to avoid

-
Tuners not the best 

Offsets are increasingly popular amongst a variety of guitar players, so it’s only right we include one on our list of the best DIY guitar kits. 

This is an affordable kit that includes a primed body and neck (though a quick sanding wouldn’t go amiss), all the necessary hardware and a decent set of P-90 pickups. Most of the electronics are already done, so there’s no soldering involved; just clip your pickups in. The frets might benefit from a polish when you’re assembling, and the tuners aren’t the best we’ve seen – but then again that’s reflected in the price, and everything else makes up for it. 

Unlike other guitars in this style, this kit doesn’t have a tremolo arm, instead going for a hardtail tune-o-matic style bridge. That’s no bad thing, as trem units around this price don’t always work particularly well.

Best DIY guitar kits: Guitar Fabric Ricky Kit

(Image credit: Guitar Fabric )

4. Guitar Fabric Ricky Kit

An indie icon that you can build at home, for a fraction of the cost of the real thing

Specifications

Price: £175
Difficulty level: Medium
Body wood: Mahogany
Pickups: HH

Reasons to buy

+
A lot cheaper than a real one
+
Plenty to go at build-wise 
+
Cool design

Reasons to avoid

-
Not for everyone

With prices for the real thing sitting around the £2k mark, you can build your own in a similar style for about 10% of the price with this DIY kit. There’s no mistaking which guitar this is trying to be, and is sure to be a big hit with indie rockers, with the likes of Paul Weller, Johnny Marr, Pete Townshend and The Beatles playing very similar instruments.

The guitar’s body is made from mahogany and has already been routed for the wiring and pickups. The neck is a lovely Canadian maple, with a 24 fret jatoba fingerboard and is ready to be set into the body’s perfectly cut neck pocket. This guitar kit also features solderless wiring, so once all your electronics are in place, all you have to do is clip them together – no dodgy soldering jobs required here.

The included humbuckers won’t give you quite the same jangle you’d get from the original pickups, but they’re certainly not bad sounding. The hardware also completes the ’50s style look that you’ve seen grace so many stages around the world over the years. 

Best DIY guitar kits: Coban Guitars PR8M Mahogany

(Image credit: Coban Guitars)

5. Coban Guitars PR8M Mahogany

Try building your own modern twin humbucker guitar

Specifications

Price: £160
Difficulty level: Fairly easy
Body wood: Mahogany
Pickups: HH

Reasons to buy

+
Nice chunky mahogany body
+
Decent set of humbuckers
+
Set neck

Reasons to avoid

-
Not much

A mahogany body paired with a mahogany neck and ebony fingerboard makes for a timeless combo with this C22 style guitar. A dual humbucker design means you can get a range of powerful and chunky tones, suitable for everything from metal to pop, country and beyond.

It’s a relatively easy build, with all the soldering having been done for you, though rest assured there’s still plenty for you to get stuck into. The body has been routed for all the wiring too, so there’s no tricky drilling or incredibly specialist equipment required. This DIY guitar kit also features a set neck construction, which many players claim leads to increased sustain. 

Best DIY guitar kits: Buying advice

Tele-style DIY guitar kit on a workbench

(Image credit: Getty/cirano83)

Assembling your own DIY guitar kit

How easy it is to assemble should be a big consideration when choosing the best DIY guitar kit for you. If you’re completely new to it all, look for something that’s easy to put together. You’ll ideally want pre-soldered electronics, and as few parts as possible – so look for something without a tremolo unit, as a hardtail guitar is less fuss. If you’re not a stranger to handyman jobs or a bit of tinkering here and there, then you can look for something a little more advanced, with a few more parts for you to get your teeth into.

DIY guitar kits vary in terms of quality too. Some of the cheaper kits might not be as premium as others, but they might be the best option for someone just wanting to try building their own guitar for the first time. Lesser quality hardware will likely affect tuning stability and resonance, but they’re a fairly easy part to upgrade should you wish. Finding an after-market set of decent tuners, whilst it might be an additional cost, could work wonders for your finished product. 

You’ll want to consider that finished product too. Look carefully at what pickups are included; if you’ve always hankered after the jangle and bite of single coils, then you don’t want to be going for a Les Paul style kit; even if it's easier to build. Also, if you don’t want a particularly heavy guitar at the end of it, then pay attention to the woods that are included as these will have an effect on the weight of it. Things like fingerboard radius can have an impact on how the guitar will play when it’s all finished too, so check that out, if it’s likely to affect how you’ll react to it.

DIY guitar building tips

Having a decent set of tools is going to make the job of building your guitar easier. They say a poor workman blames his tools, but in this case, you’re not going to get far if your screwdrivers don’t fit. On that point, a comprehensive set of screwdrivers is going to help make sure that everything is screwed in tightly so you’ll get a guitar that resonates better, and is less likely to come loose.

The best DIY guitar kits will usually come already sanded, but giving it another go-over yourself will result in a better finished guitar. You could even sand the neck profile down to suit your own playing style. The frets will usually benefit from a quick check too. Filing down or trimming any slightly problematic frets will help notes ring out properly and play better. 

Also, it might be an obvious one, but with these DIY guitar kits, we’d always recommend sticking to the instructions. Read them carefully and follow what they say so that you get the best possible result. Throw in your personal style where possible, but rest assured that the manufacturers probably know best!

Thank you for reading 5 articles this month*

Join now for unlimited access

US pricing $3.99 per month or $39.00 per year

UK pricing £2.99 per month or £29.00 per year 

Europe pricing €3.49 per month or €34.00 per year

*Read 5 free articles per month without a subscription

Join now for unlimited access

Prices from £2.99/$3.99/€3.49

Richard Blenkinsop
Richard Blenkinsop

After spending a decade in music retail, I’m now a freelance writer for Guitar World, MusicRadar, Guitar Player and Reverb, specialising in electric and acoustic guitars bass, and almost anything else you can make a tune with. When my head’s not buried in the best of modern and vintage gear, I run a small company helping musicians with songwriting, production and performance, and I play bass in an alt-rock band.