Jim Dunlop Effect Pedal Throwdown, Round 1: CGB95 Cry Baby Wah Wah Vs. GCB95F Cry Baby Classic Wah Wah

It's time to compare the mettle of Jim Dunlop pedals!

In GuitarWorld.com's latest readers poll — the first annual Jim Dunlop Effect Pedal Throwdown — we're pitting Dunlop, MXR and Way Huge pedals against each other in a no-holds-barred shootout.

Yes, we're pulling out all the stomps! Thirty-two stompboxes will go head to head — or toe to toe, if you prefer — culminating with the crowning of the king of Dunlop pedals.

You can check out the beginning bracket — with all 32 competing pedals — in the Scribd.com (opens in new tab) window below (Be sure to click on the "full screen" button in the lower-right-hand corner to expand the bracket).

The bracket will be updated after (almost) every matchup, and matchups will take place pretty much every day, excluding weekends. Each competing pedal will accompanied by a demo video created by the Jim Dunlop company, and you'll always find a photo gallery of the competing pedals at the bottom of each matchup.

Today's Matchup

In today's matchup (which happens to be the final Round 1 matchup), the Dunlop CGB95 Cry Baby Wah Wah goes foot to foot against the Dunlop GCB95F Cry Baby Classic Wah Wah. Start voting below!

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS: Yesterday, the MXR Phase 90 (68.11 percent) defeated the MXR Phase 100 (31.89 percent) to advance to the next round! To see all the matchups that have taken place so far, head HERE. Thanks for voting!

Meet the Combatants

Dunlop CGB95 Cry Baby Wah Wah

When people talk about wah-wah pedals, they’re talking about the Cry Baby Wahs. This is the one that created some of the most timeless sounds in rock. The pedal that would eventually become the Cry Baby was first created in 1966 by engineers at the Thomas Organ Company.

This new and expressive effect was an instant hit with players like Jimi Hendrix and Eric Clapton, who have contributed to the Cry Baby Wah’s huge popularity to this day. While other effects have come and gone, the Cry Baby Wah just keeps getting better with age.
Dunlop GCB95F Cry Baby Classic Wah Wah

The heart and soul of the original wah pedals was the legendary Fasel inductor, and the Cry Baby Classic has it. Why is that important? Because the Fasel inductor was the key to the gorgeous tone, voice, and sweep of those first wahs. Plus, these inductors have been unavailable for decades. Now you can get that magic tone again. Go back in time with the Cry Baby Classic with Fasel Inside. Hear what you've been missing.

NOTE: For today's matchup, we have only one demo video. Both pedals are demoed in the same clip. We'll go back to our two-video format tomorrow. Enjoy!

Voting Closed!

The Dunlop GCB95F Cry Baby Classic Wah Wah (62.56 percent) crushed the Dunlop CGB95 Cry Baby Wah Wah (37.44 percent) to advance to the next round! To see the current matchup and all the matchups that have taken place so far, head HERE. Thanks for voting!

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Damian Fanelli
Editor-in-Chief, Guitar World

Damian is Editor-in-Chief of Guitar World magazine. In past lives, he was GW’s managing editor and online managing editor. He's written liner notes for major-label releases, including Stevie Ray Vaughan's 'The Complete Epic Recordings Collection' (Sony Legacy) and has interviewed everyone from Yngwie Malmsteen to Kevin Bacon (with a few memorable Eric Clapton chats thrown into the mix). Damian, a former member of Brooklyn's The Gas House Gorillas (opens in new tab), was the sole guitarist in Mister Neutron (opens in new tab), a trio that toured the U.S. and released three albums (opens in new tab). He now plays in two NYC-area bands.