Skip to main content

Ernie Ball Music Man updates the Mariposa model with stunning new finishes

Ernie Ball Music Man's newly updated Mariposa models
(Image credit: Ernie Ball Music Man)

Back in January, Ernie Ball Music Man released an affordable, Sterling by Music Man version of its Omar Rodríguez-López signature electric guitar, the Mariposa.

This doesn't mean, however, that the company has lost sight of the more upscale, US-made version – not by a long shot. EBMM has now debuted an updated version of the luxurious signature guitar, complete with two beautiful new finishes.

When bought with one of the new Galaxy Pearl and Sahara Sunset finishes, the Mariposa will come with an ornate pickguard color-coordinated to match the finish, with gold hardware and gold hat knobs to boot.

Intriguingly, the tonewood for the 2021 version of the guitar has also been changed – from the original's lightweight African mahogany to lightweight Okoume.

Image 1 of 2

Ernie Ball Music Man Mariposa Sahara Sunset

Ernie Ball Music Man Mariposa Sahara Sunset (Image credit: Ernie Ball Music Man)
Image 2 of 2

Ernie Ball Music Man Mariposa Galaxy Pearl

Ernie Ball Music Man Mariposa Galaxy Pearl (Image credit: Ernie Ball Music Man)

Otherwise, the enhanced Mariposa features the same roasted maple neck with an ebony fingerboard boasting pearlescent style block inlays, and the same pair of custom-designed, distortion-friendly Ernie Ball Music Man Modern humbuckers – each with its own individual volume knob.  

Elsewhere, the Music Man Modern tremolo and Schaller M6-IND locking tuners remain as well.

The Ernie Ball Music Man Mariposa Deluxe is available now – in the two new finishes or an Imperial White colorway – for $3,099, while the standard Mariposa, which comes with a Dorado Green finish and chrome, rather than gold, hardware, rings up at $2,999.

For more on the guitar, stop by Ernie Ball Music Man.

Jackson Maxwell

Jackson is an Associate Editor at guitarworld.com. He’s been writing and editing stories about new gear, technique and guitar-driven music both old and new since 2014, and has also written extensively on the same topics for Guitar Player. Elsewhere, his album reviews and essays have appeared in Louder and Unrecorded. Though open to music of all kinds, his greatest love has always been indie, and everything that falls under its massive umbrella. To that end, you can find him on Twitter crowing about whatever great new guitar band you need to drop everything to hear right now.