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Line 6 reveals the DL4 MkII, a reboot of its legendary multi-function delay/looper pedal

Line 6 DL4 MkII
(Image credit: Line 6)

Line 6 has introduced the DL4 MkII – a revamped iteration of its iconic DL4 delay pedal that hauls the 1999-dated original into the modern era by way of some neat aesthetic and tonal modifications.

When the original unit debuted over two decades ago, it marked a significant leap forward in the effects world, and was one of the very first multi-function digital effects processors to be released.

It developed something of a cult following, and has been a pedalboard stalwart for whole legions of players ever since it first burst onto the scene.

Now, Line 6 has issued a timely reboot, which, with the help of its celebrated HX technology, equips the much-loved unit with some seriously impressive updates.

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Line 6 DL4 MkII

(Image credit: Line 6)
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Line 6 DL4 MkII

(Image credit: Line 6)
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Line 6 DL4 MkII

(Image credit: Line 6)
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Line 6 DL4 MkII

(Image credit: Line 6)
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Line 6 DL4 MkII

(Image credit: Line 6)

Under the hood, the DL4 MkII features 15 new delay types all drawn from the HX family of effects processors, as well as the 15 original delay models that can be found on the flagship DL4 – so, 30 delay types in all.

Such delays include Harmony Delay, Pitch Echo, Glitch Delay, Euclidian Delay and ADT tape delay, all of which line up alongside 15 unmarked “secret” reverbs accessed by holding down the new Legacy button.

Examples of the reverbs include Room, Double Tank, Plateaux, Plate, Cave, Ganymede and Glitz.

In practice, the Model Selector rotary switch is responsible for choosing the delay type, while the remaining five knobs – Time, Repeats, Tweak, Tweez and Mix – are in charge of tweaking the delay to your desire. So far, that’s identical to the original DL4.

However, the presence of the Alt/Legacy button means users can access all the classic DL4 delays, as well as a range of other alternate functions. These include selecting specific subdivisions via the Time/Subdivision knob, setting the mix of the reverb-effected signal via Mix and adjusting reverb decay times.

Other updates include an improved looper, which now offers either a four- or one-switch looper option that can record up to 240 seconds of mono or 120 seconds of stereo time. This can further be extended with an additional microSD card.

The looper works in lieu of the four footswitches, three of which also function as preset recall buttons. There’s also the Tap Tempo function, which, again, was found on the original.

As for connectivity, the DL4 MkII sports an XLR dynamic microphone input and MIDI capabilities, as well as a Y-cable adapter-compatible external footswitch input for “increased creative control”.

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Line 6 DL4 MkII

(Image credit: Line 6)
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Line 6 DL4 MkII

(Image credit: Line 6)

Of the new-and-improved DL4 MkII, Line 6 Chief Product Design Architect Eric Klein said, “Certain circles have touted DL4 as arguably the most important pedal of the last 20 years, and even after 23 years – an eternity in this industry – we couldn’t imagine messing with a good thing.

"So,” he continued, “despite its new delays, modern capabilities, and increased fidelity, a single button press literally turns the DL4 MkII into a DL4 – so you can still party like it’s 1999."

The Line 6 DL4 MkII is available now for $419.

For more information, head over to Line 6.

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Matt is a News Writer, writing for Guitar World, Guitarist and Total Guitar. He has a Masters in the guitar, a degree in history, and has spent the last 16 years playing everything from blues and jazz to indie and pop. When he’s not combining his passion for writing and music during his day job, Matt records for a number of UK-based bands and songwriters as a session musician.