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ESP adds electrifying Rainbow Crackle finish to its shred-ready LTD '87 Series models

All five of ESP's new Rainbow Crackle LTD '87 models
(Image credit: ESP Guitars)

Last January, ESP kicked off its 45th birthday celebration in style with the unveiling of its LTD '87 series of electric guitars.

Boasting era-correct designs and hot-rod electronics, the line aimed to serve as a shred-friendly celebration of ESP's significant role in the development of hard rock and metal guitar tone in the late '80s and early '90s.

Now, the company has further souped up the models in the LTD '87 series – the Eclipse ’87, Eclipse ’87 NT, Mirage Deluxe ‘87, M-1 Custom ‘87 and Surveyor ’87 bass guitar – by re-introducing the head-turning, eye-catching Rainbow Crackle finish that was offered in the company's 1987 catalog.

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ESP's new LTD Eclipse ’87 Rainbow Crackle model

ESP's new LTD Eclipse ’87 Rainbow Crackle model (Image credit: ESP Guitars)
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ESP's new LTD Eclipse ’87 NT Rainbow Crackle model

ESP's new LTD Eclipse ’87 NT Rainbow Crackle model (Image credit: ESP Guitars)

Based on the original ESP Eclipse TE shape, the LTD Eclipse ’87 – available with or without (on the NT model) a Floyd Rose – comes in both the new Rainbow Crackle finish, or Pearl White, Turquoise (NT model only) and Black (Floyd Rose-sporting model only) colorways.

The guitar features a mahogany body and a three-piece maple neck with a Macassar Ebony fingerboard boasting 24 extra jumbo frets.

Sonically, it sports a set of Seymour Duncan JB/’59 pickups with original style bobbins, individual volume and tone knobs, and a push-pull control for coil-splitting operation.

The LTD Eclipse ’87 Rainbow Crackle goes for $1,199, while its NT counterpart rings up at $1,099.

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ESP's new LTD M-1 Custom ‘87 Rainbow Crackle

ESP's new LTD M-1 Custom ‘87 Rainbow Crackle model (Image credit: ESP Guitars)
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ESP's new LTD Mirage Deluxe ‘87 Rainbow Crackle model

ESP's new LTD Mirage Deluxe ‘87 Rainbow Crackle model (Image credit: ESP Guitars)

Based on the original ESP M-1 model, the LTD M-1 Custom ‘87 – aside from the Rainbow Crackle look – comes in Black, Dark Metallic Blue and Candy Apple Red finishes.

Its single Seymour Duncan Distortion TB-6 pickup can be split via a push-pull control, while its sole volume knob is complimented by an EMG PA-2 active boost switch.

The guitar has an alder body, a Floyd Rose 1000 tremolo and a three-piece maple neck with a Macassar Ebony fingerboard boasting 24 extra jumbo frets. The Rainbow Crackle version of the guitar is available now for $1,099.

The LTD Mirage Deluxe ‘87, meanwhile, is available in Pearl Pink and Turquoise finishes, aside from the Rainbow Crackle paint job. 

Electronically, it's loaded with a Seymour Duncan Distortion TB-6 pickup in the bridge and a Seymour Duncan Hot Rail in the neck, with individual volume and tone knobs and a three-way switch. Coil-splitting is available once again via a push-pull control.

The LTD Mirage Deluxe ‘87 has an alder body, a Floyd Rose 1000 tremolo and a three-piece maple neck with a Macassar Ebony fingerboard boasting 22 extra jumbo frets. The Rainbow Crackle version of the guitar is available now for $1,099.

ESP's new LTD Surveyor '87 Rainbow Crackle bass

ESP's new LTD Surveyor '87 Rainbow Crackle bass (Image credit: ESP Guitars)

To finish things off, there's the LTD Surveyor '87 four-string bass, which is – aside from the Rainbow Crackle look – also available in Black and Pearl White finishes.

The low-end machine features an alder body and a maple neck with a Macassar Ebony fingerboard featuring 21 extra jumbo frets. There's also a Gotoh bridge, and Seymour Duncan Vintage Jazz (bridge) and Seymour Duncan Vintage P (neck) pickups, with individual volume, Balance and tone knobs.

The Rainbow Crackle version of the bass is available now for $999.

Quantities of these Rainbow Crackle models are reportedly somewhat limited, so act quickly and head on over to ESP if you wanna snatch one up.

Jackson Maxwell

Jackson is an Associate Editor at guitarworld.com. He’s been writing and editing stories about new gear, technique and guitar-driven music both old and new since 2014, and has also written extensively on the same topics for Guitar Player. Elsewhere, his album reviews and essays have appeared in Louder and Unrecorded. Though open to music of all kinds, his greatest love has always been indie, and everything that falls under its massive umbrella. To that end, you can find him on Twitter crowing about whatever great new guitar band you need to drop everything to hear right now.