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kwyatt

Guitar World Member For: 3 years 30 weeks
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Lesson: Country-Funk - What Hank Williams and James Brown have in Common

Most of you are probably familiar with the two-beat “boom-chick” style of rhythm playing so prevalent in classic country music. You may be surprised to learn that the groove that drives, say, Hank Williams’s “Your Cheatin’ Heart” is not that far removed from the one that drives a funk song like the James Brown instrumental “Night Train.”

Fill ‘Er Up: Creating Guitar Melodies Between Vocal Lines

Fills, those brief instrumental runs that occupy the spaces between vocal lines, no doubt have their origin in the call-and-response vocal tradition associated with country blues, gospel, work songs and field hollers. On records, guitar fills can be overdubbed, but you can enhance both your rhythm playing and soloing by learning to alternate seamlessly between steady chord patterns and well-placed melodic phrases.

Lesson: Creating Harmonies Within the Major Scale

Certain memorable themes, like those of Bill Wither’s “Lean on Me” and Gustavo Santaolalla’s "Brokeback Mountain," to name just two, artfully derive melodies and chordal accompaniment from an extraordinarily useful system called scale harmony.

Talkin’ Blues with Keith Wyatt: Cliff Gallup’s Smooth, Lyrical Ballad-Playing Style

These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the October 2014 issue of Guitar World. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the Guitar World Online Store.

Talkin’ Blues with Keith Wyatt: A Tribute to Cliff Gallup’s Legendary Flash

These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the September 2014 issue of Guitar World. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the Guitar World Online Store.

Talkin’ Blues with Keith Wyatt: Electric Soul — Snooks Eaglin, Part 2

Last month, we examined the acoustic mastery of New Orleans guitarist Snooks Eaglin, which was captured on the acclaimed 1959 album New Orleans Street Singer.

Ironically, solo acoustic performance was only a sideline for Eaglin, who mainly played electric guitar and sang with full bands. Between 1960 and 1963, a series of Dave Bartholomew–produced contemporary New Orleans–style R&B recordings for Imperial Records explored that aspect of his talent.

Talkin' Blues with Keith Wyatt: The “Unplugged” Artistry of Snooks Eaglin, New Orleans’ Best Kept Secret

These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the July 2014 issue of Guitar World. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the Guitar World Online Store.

Talkin' Blues: Little Walter's Exciting Up-Tempo Jump-Blues Soloing Style

Little Walter served his musical apprenticeship in Delta roadhouses during the early Forties and intently studied the style and techniques of down-home blues harmonica masters such as John Lee “Sonny Boy” Williamson, but he also took the instrument into new territory by emulating the jazz-tinged phrasing of jump-blues saxophonists.

Talkin' Blues with Keith Wyatt: Harmonizing the Drums

These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the June 2014 issue of Guitar World. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the Guitar World Online Store.

Lesson: Harmonizing With Fourths

As the interval between the fifth scale degree and the octave, the fourth is basic to the structure of most chords. When used melodically, however, fourths are not nearly as versatile as thirds and sixths. As you’ll see, though, fourths have found a home within, of all places, R&B, soul, and funk. Check out this lesson with audio and tab...