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Best budget bass guitars 2022: our top pick of basses under $500/£500

Gretsch G2220 Electromatic Jet Bass guitar on a black background
(Image credit: Future)

The bass guitar is crucial to any band’s sound. Without it, you wouldn’t have the low end power that drives so much of the music we love. If you’re thinking of taking up this crucial instrument, or you fancy adding another piece to your existing collection, but you’re keeping an eye on the price tag, then you might want to consider one of the best budget bass guitars.

While often overlooked in favor of the seemingly more glamorous electric guitar, the bass is the glue that holds a band together, merging the rhythm of the drums with the melody of the guitars, keys and vocals. Arm yourself with one of the best bass guitars under $500 and you’ll have a tool that will allow you to do this confidently, without having to spend a fortune.

The best budget bass guitars will be reliable, and sound good. Luckily, we’re seeing some really good stuff, mostly from the Far East, that doesn’t cost the earth and ticks all of these boxes. Whilst dropping a load of cash on a pricier bass will undoubtedly get you some killer tones and features, these aren’t always necessary. If you’re on the road playing in bars and clubs, then usually a good sun-$500 bass will serve you just as well. 

We’ve looked at what’s on offer right now and compiled a list of the best budget bass guitars, catering for different types of player and styles of music.

We've included some expert buying advice at the end of this guide, so if you'd like to read more about what to look for in a budget bass, then click the link. If you'd rather get to the products, then keep scrolling.

Best budget bass guitars: Guitar World Recommends

There are a few really stand-out models out there at the moment. For its sheer versatility and quality of tones, the Ibanez SR300E (opens in new tab) really is one of the best cheap basses around. With pickups that cover humbucking and single coil tones (including an enhanced low-end single coil option), you’ve got loads of tones at your fingertips.

The Sub Ray4 (opens in new tab) from Sterling by Music Man is also a great budget bass for everything from pop to heavy metal. If you’re seeking an old-school classic, then we can’t recommend the Squier Classic Vibe ’60s Precision Bass enough! 

Best budget bass guitars: Product guide

Best budget bass guitars: Ibanez SR300E

(Image credit: Ibanez )

1. Ibanez SR300E

One of the most versatile basses for under $500/£500

Specifications

Body: Nyatoh
Neck: 5pc Maple/Walnut
Fingerboard: Jatoba
Pickups: PowerSpan Dual Coil (passive)
Scale: 34”

Reasons to buy

+
Clear and dynamic pickups
+
Clever pickup switching
+
Covers everything
+
Affordable

Reasons to avoid

-
Not everyone’s style

This bass can cover so much ground in terms of musical styles. If you want a modern rock or metal sound, then the high output PowerSpan Dual Coil humbuckers can dish out powerful, thunderous tones whilst retaining note clarity nicely. However, at the push of a button you can switch these pickups into single coil mode for more traditional, old-school tones. There’s even a low-end enhanced single coil mode for beefing up those bass frequencies. Add to this an active EQ and you’ve got a pickup system with which you can really nail any tone.

The body is nice and sleek and lightweight too, making playing comfortable, whether you’re stood up or sat down. The cutouts also make access to any fret on the fingerboard really easy. The hardware is of a decent quality too, so tuning stability, intonation and resonance won’t prove to be an issue. 

It’s more of a modern looking instrument, so it might not be right for someone wanting a classic looking bass, but don’t let that put you off – there really isn’t much it can’t do in terms of tones.

Best budget bass guitars: Sterling SUB Ray4

(Image credit: Sterling by Music Man)

2. Sterling SUB Ray4

Great tones, superb playability and a great look, all for under $500

Specifications

Body: Basswood
Neck: Maple
Fingerboard: Hard Maple
Pickups: Ceramic Humbucker
Scale: 34”

Reasons to buy

+
Great playability
+
Lovely, rounded tone
+
Versatile
+
Responsive active EQ

Reasons to avoid

-
Not much

This is a cheaper version of the famed Music Man Sterling bass. Fitted with a single humbucker, it’s capable of summoning some great, rumbly bass tones suitable for everything from rock and metal to jazz and funk. The on-board active EQ is great for tone shaping as well, allowing you to cut or boost both treble and bass frequencies so that you can be heard better in a mix. Even though it’s a single pickup bass, you can get a really wide range of tones. 

These things play great straight out of the box too, with a slim neck profile to suit any playing style. Fingerstyle players can pluck, slap and pop with ease, and for those who feel more comfortable with a guitar pick, the layout makes that a piece of cake too. 

For the money, this is hard to beat – definitely one of the best budget bass guitars in our price range. If you need an extended lower range, it’s also available in a 5-string format too.

Best budget bass guitars: Squier Classic Vibe ’60s P-Bass

(Image credit: Squier )

3. Squier Classic Vibe ’60s P-Bass

A budget version of the classic ’60s Fender Precision bass

Specifications

Body: Poplar
Neck: Maple
Fingerboard: Indian Laurel
Pickups: Fender Designed Alnico Split Single-Coil
Scale: 34”

Reasons to buy

+
Can’t go wrong with a P-Bass
+
Great budget version of a ’60s model
+
Simple
+
Does pretty much everything

Reasons to avoid

-
Nothing

Few basses are as iconic as the Precision. It was one of the earliest solidbody bass guitars and it can be heard on countless classic recordings from over the last 70 years or so. Now, you can get that classic P sound in the form of the Squier Classic Vibe ’60s Precision Bass.

The Squier Classic Vibe Precision gives you that luscious deep, warm tone, with a nice little mid-range bump. It’s a key part of the soul and Motown sound, though classic rock, punk, pop and country bassists love them too – basically, there’s not much they can’t do. It has a single pickup, with a volume and tone knob – the latter of which, when moved around, can have a massive impact on the sound. 

Squier’s build quality is fantastic and the Classic Vibe models are some of their best. The ’60s P Bass serves up some old-school vibes for players on a budget, though to be honest, it’s a great bass for anyone to have in their arsenal. 

Best budget bass guitars: Yamaha TRBX 305

(Image credit: Yamaha)

4. Yamaha TRBX 305

A modern, versatile workhorse with an extended low-end

Specifications

Body: Mahogany
Neck: 5-Piece Maple / Mahogany
Fingerboard: Rosewood
Pickups: Yamaha Ceramic HU
Scale: 34”

Reasons to buy

+
Great punchy pickups
+
Modern yet versatile
+
Active EQ

Reasons to avoid

-
Look is not for traditionalists

Available in both 4 or 5 string formats, the Yamaha TRBX 300 bass guitars are powerful beasts. Fitted with ceramic magnet-equipped pickups that help deliver a strong, deep, clear tone, they’re great for everything from jazz to metal. Whether you need a dynamic clean tone, or a full-on, overdriven rock bass sound, these hum-cancelling pickups, along with an active EQ, have you covered. 

The mahogany body has curves in the right places making it really comfortable to play for long periods both sat down and stood up, and the fairly slim neck profile is great for a range of playing styles. The pickups even have a slight contour cut out of the edge for you to rest your thumb, which makes playing fingerstyle that bit more comfortable.

The Yamaha TRBX 305 (and its four-string counterpart) covers a lot of ground. If you need a bass to cater for various genres, then this could well be it, though it really excels as a rock and metal bass.

Best budget bass guitars: Gretsch G2220 Electromatic Junior Jet II

(Image credit: Gretsch)

5. Gretsch G2220 Electromatic Junior Jet II

This short-scale bass doesn’t come up short when comes to chunky bass tones

Specifications

Body: Basswood
Neck: Maple
Fingerboard: Laurel
Pickups: Single-Coil Bass
Scale: 30.3”

Reasons to buy

+
Nice sounding single coils
+
Three-way pickup selector
+
Great playability
+
Beautiful finishes

Reasons to avoid

-
Short-scale only

Gretsch make some incredibly stylish instruments, and their short-scale G2220 is a prime example of this. Coming in at well under our $500 budget, it offers some serious bang for buck and will provide indie rockers, country players and metalheads alike with the low end rumble they so desire. 

It’s fitted with a pair of single-coil pickups that deliver a range of vintage-inspired tones. The three-way pickup selector allows for a variety of sounds too, from super warm and mellow in the neck position, to a brighter sound with a snappier attack in the bridge position. You’ve also got a tone control alongside the volume for further tweaking. 

The short scale offers a slightly different feel which some bassists love. Guitarists moving on to bass also sometimes opt for a short scale bass too, as the scale length feels a little more familiar. The single cut body shape and comfortable neck profile further add to the playability of this bass.

Best budget bass guitars: Epiphone Thunderbird E1

(Image credit: Epiphone )

6. Epiphone Thunderbird E1

If it’s good enough for some of the biggest names in rock…

Specifications

Body: Mahogany
Neck: Maple
Fingerboard: Rosewood
Pickups: TB Plus Humbucker
Scale: 34”

Reasons to buy

+
Visually stunning
+
Big sounding pickups

Reasons to avoid

-
Not exactly subtle

The Epiphone Thunderbird is an absolute rock machine for players on a budget. Thunderbirds have been the bass of choice for players such as Nikki Sixx, Gene Simmons, John Entwistle and many more. The pair of humbuckers help deliver some low end growl that sounds great either clean or with overdrive. Having the second pickup placed more in the middle, as opposed to nearer the neck, also eliminates some of the dark, muddy tone that you can sometimes get, instead giving you a nice clear punch that might surprise you with its versatility.

Epiphone Thunderbirds sound great, but they also look incredible too. Their offset body shape renders them instantly recognizable and helps you stand out from the crowd too. Plus, with Epiphone’s amazing build quality, you’ll have a bass that’s built to last, whether you’re in the studio or on the road. 

Best budget bass guitars: Hofner Ignition Bass

(Image credit: Hofner)

7. Hofner Ignition Bass

This short scale violin bass will keep you rocking eight days a week

Specifications

Body: Maple/Spruce
Neck: Maple
Fingerboard: Rosewood
Pickups: Hofner Ignition Staple Nickel
Scale: 30”

Reasons to buy

+
Beatles bass on a budget
+
Nails that ’60s bass sound
+
Compact body

Reasons to avoid

-
Lacks top end
-
Look not for everyone

Now this might not be for everyone, but for fans of the Fab Four, it’s one of the best bass guitars that you can get for under $500. Of course, it’s not the same model as the one McCartney used, but it will certainly get you in the right ballpark. 

The Hofner Ignition isn’t just a ‘Beatles bass’ though – it’s actually great for all sorts of different styles of music: classic rock, soul, jazz and more. You don’t get much sustain, but that’s part of its charm. It’s nice and thumpy, without much top end but plenty of rounded, warm, bottom end and a nice attack. These are actually great recording basses, provided you don’t need sustain or much rumble, as they can sit really nicely in the mix before even touching an EQ. It’s also a short scale bass, so it’s ideal for younger or smaller bassists. 

Best budget bass guitars: Squier Affinity Jazz Bass

(Image credit: Squier)

8. Squier Affinity Jazz Bass

One of the best cheap bass guitars for newcomers

Specifications

Body: Poplar
Neck: Maple
Fingerboard: Indian Laurel/Maple
Pickups: Ceramic Single-Coil Jazz Bass
Scale: 34”

Reasons to buy

+
Classic Jazz Bass sound
+
Affordable
+
Great starting point

Reasons to avoid

-
Too basic for more experienced players

This is a no-frills Jazz bass made by Squier, the sister company of Fender. The Jazz bass has been the choice of loads of bassists over the years including Flea, John Paul Jones, Geddy Lee and plenty more. Whether it’s funk, rock or pretty much anything else you’re playing, you can’t go wrong with a Jazz bass. 

Squier’s Affinity range aims to provide players with high quality instruments at an affordable price. If you’re just starting out and you want a reliable bass that doesn’t cost too much, then this is one of the best options out there. The hardware, pickups and build quality are all up to a good standard so you’ll get decent tones, it’s going to stay in tune well, and it will be comfortable to play. Whilst you might not get the same sort of definition and clarity as some more expensive basses, it’s a great piece of kit for the money.  

Best budget bass guitars: Buying advice

Closeup of the headstock of the Gretsch G2220 Electromatic

(Image credit: Future)

So, you’re ready to spend your cash on a great bass guitar. You’ve already set your max budget as $500/£500, so what else do you need to consider?

Vintage vs modern style

The first thing is sound. Do you want a classic bass sound, as heard on some of your favorite old-school records? If so, then check out a bass with a vintage style spec. Squier’s versions of the Fender P and Jazz basses haven’t altered too much over time so will get you in the right ball park. 

If you’re after something a little more contemporary, then you might want to look at a bass with a few more features. An active EQ can go a long way in helping you shape your tone, and higher output pickups will allow you to get bigger, chunkier and dirtier tones that are much more suited to today’s heavier styles of music. 

Basses with more than one pickup will also allow you to change or blend between them too, which can be great if you need a variety of tones to hand. Of course, so much of the sound is in your fingers, so if you feel more comfortable with a particular style of bass, then you’ll almost certainly be able to make whatever you’ve got for work for you.

What body size/shape do I need?

This brings us on to your next consideration – comfort. There are a number of different factors that can make a bass guitar comfortable for you. The different body shapes and sizes will suit different people, as will the neck profile – certain players prefer thinner, ‘faster’ neck shapes, whereas others get on better with a chunkier neck. 

Closeup of the bridge and bridge pickup of the Gretsch G2220 Electromatic Junior Jet Bass II

(Image credit: Future)

Does the scale length make a difference?

The scale length can also play a big part in how comfortable you find the bass. The scale length is the distance between the nut at the top of the neck and the string saddles that sit on the bridge. A shorter scale length means that the neck isn’t quite as long, so reaching down to the bottom frets is less of a stretch, and this can be ideal for younger beginners with a smaller arm span. Some adult bassists also find a short scale more comfortable too; it’s down to personal preference. 

What brands make the best budget bass guitars?

There are some good reliable brands to keep an eye out for too when shopping for the best cheap basses. The likes of Squier, Sterling and Epiphone are all overseen by their big-sister companies – Fender, Music Man and Gibson respectively – who are all major players in the bass world. The likes of Yamaha, Ibanez and Gretsch are also synonymous with making high quality musical instruments, so you’re in good hands with any of those, too. 

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After spending a decade in music retail, I’m now a freelance writer for Guitar World, MusicRadar, Guitar Player and Reverb, specialising in electric and acoustic guitars bass, and almost anything else you can make a tune with. When my head’s not buried in the best of modern and vintage gear, I run a small company helping musicians with songwriting, production and performance, and I play bass in an alt-rock band.