Discounts on Yamaha's excellent THRII desktop amps are super rare, but Amazon just started slashing prices across the range for Black Friday

Yamaha TH
(Image credit: Yamaha)

Yamaha’s hugely popular THR series amps were a game-changer when they first launched, hanging around fulfilling the purpose of the Yamaha-coined term as your ‘third amp’. That is, the guitar amp that fills the gap between the limited, sometimes ugly black box in the corner of your room and the impractical overpowered nature of your on-stage amp  –  and luckily various models are now on sale in the Amazon Black Friday sale

With stylish looks and plenty of features, including amp modelling, effects, USB audio, Bluetooth and mobile connectivity, the latest Yamaha THRII series offers a lot of bang for its buck – plus they won’t look out of place in your front room. 

It doesn’t end there though, because Yamaha also makes the THRII Wireless, which has a built-in receiver for a Line 6 Relay G10II - the wireless transmitter produced by Yamaha’s sister company.

As you might expect, these amps don’t get discounted very often, mainly because they don’t need to be. But, that’s not stopping online retail giant Amazon from applying some savings. The THRII and THR Wireless models are both included in Black Friday guitar deals, with multiple versions on offer. Here’s what you can get!

Yamaha THR10II: Was $329.99, now $309.99

Yamaha THR10II: Was $329.99, now $309.99
The perfect home amp, the 20-watt THR10II has got 15 amp models, 3 bass amps, 3 mic models for your electro-acoustic, four modulation effects and four reverb types. There’s Bluetooth and wired connections for hooking up your music playback devices, as well as USB audio for computer recording, and you can edit the sounds via your phone with the THR Editor app for iOS and Android. 

iOS users can also benefit from Yamaha’s Rec’N’Share app, which puts the THR tone into your phone videos, making it an easy, convenient way to capture your playing on camera!

Yamaha THR10II WL: Was $469.99, now $429.99

Yamaha THR10II WL: Was $469.99, now $429.99
The THRII10 WL gives you everything the regular THR10II does, except it’s wireless and can run from a rechargeable internal battery! Inside there’s a receiver for a Line 6 Relay wireless transmitter, so, you can find the perfect spot for your amp regardless of power sockets (it can run off mains power too though). Connect to your guitar with the Relay and control your amp via your phone over Bluetooth without having to touch the amp or worry about cables.

Yamaha THR30II WL: Was $469.99, now $429.99

Yamaha THR30II WL: Was $469.99, now $429.99
The THR10II WL is excellent, but if you’ve got a bigger room and want a bit more power, step toward the THR30II. It has exactly the same features as the THRII10 models, but you’ll get a boost in volume and tone from its 30-watt output. It’s still battery-powered, it’s still wireless, just bigger and louder. Amazon is offering the same discount on the regular colour, plus Black and White models.

Line 6 Relay G10II: Was $139, now $99

Line 6 Relay G10II: Was $139, now $99
Of course, to make the most of that wireless connectivity, you’ll need the Line 6 Relay G10II transmitter. This little dongle plugs into your electric or electro-acoustic jack socket and digitally beams your signal directly to the THRII Wireless receiver. There’s no interference, and no delay, just cable-free playing. Get a hefty reduction of nearly a third off the list price.

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Stuart Williams

Stuart is a freelancer for Guitar World and heads up Total Guitar magazine's gear section. He formerly edited Total Guitar and Rhythm magazines in the UK and has been playing guitar and drums for over two decades (his arms are very tired). When he's not working on the site, he can be found gigging and depping in function bands and the odd original project.