Best pedal amps 2024: including the top amp simulator pedals

Strymon Iridium on a wooden surface
(Image credit: Future)

The ‘60s saw the dawn of the 4x12” speaker cab. The early 00’s saw lunchbox heads and Class-D-powered combos take the guitar world by storm. Guitar amplification has undoubtedly shrunk over the years, and that trend hasn’t shown any signs of slowing down.

We may look back at the 2020s as the era of the pedal amp! With so many candidates on the market, what are the best pedal amps you can buy right now?

Whilst some have been seen as niche pieces of gear or as emergency backup to a temperamental valve amp, there are now a number of genuine, full-time options for both bedroom players and professionals.

There’s no question that leading guitar pedal and amp makers all over the world have been directing a lot of energy towards this area for some time, In our round-up, you’ll see products with pedigree, from stalwarts of the amplification world spanning all budgets. And thanks to the advancements made by these companies, we’re now seeing floor amps that can finally hold their own against traditional heads. 

If you'd like to read some in-depth buying advice, click the 'buying advice' button above. If you'd rather get straight to the products, keep scrolling.

Best pedal amps: Guitar World’s choice

With an abundance of options, there is no shortage of pedal amps to suit every player and budget. For those who want a plethora of amp and cabinet options, the Strymon Iridium is still the benchmark, with its cabinet emulation struggling to be matched.

For players who might be dipping their toe into the world of pedal amps, the UAFX pedals offer a simple solution that is perfect for fans of traditional, great tube-tone and aren’t looking for too many options.

If you’re looking for an all-in-one solution that can replace both amp and pedalboard, the Hughes & Kettner Black Spirit 200 gives users a versatile and loud amplifier, with built in effects to boot. Whilst the Blackstar Dept. 10 Amped 1 provides a genuine, gig-worthy amp option for players looking to scale their rig down as much as possible.

Best pedal amps: Product guide

Best pedal amps for guitar: Strymon Idirium

(Image credit: Strymon)
The best pedal amp overall

Specifications

Type: Amp modeller and IR cab pedal
Controls: Drive, Level, Bass, Middle, Treble, Room, Amp selector switch, cab selector switch, audio input selector switch, On footswitch, Favorite footswitch
Connections: Standard input, standard outputs (L, R), EXP/MIDI, USB, stereo mini-jack headphone output
Output: N/A
Power: Supplied 9V DC adaptor, 500mA

Reasons to buy

+
Range of amp options
+
Realistic cabinet simulation
+
Includes midi inputs and outputs 

Reasons to avoid

-
You want something more niche

When it comes to finding the best pedal amp that strikes just the right balance, look no further than the Strymon Iridium Amp and IR Cab Simulator. Not only does it offer a range of amp and cab combinations with versatile EQ controls including room ambience, it’s also compact and easy to use. 

Of course, a pedal amp has to sound good, and the Iridium does a great job of modelling some classic amps and cabs. With amp settings Round, Chime and Punch you can convincingly replicate Fender Deluxe, Vox AC30 and Marshall Super Lead amplifiers. The nine speaker cabinet pairings, meanwhile, are not only realistic but highly-responsive – something many of its simulator/emulator peers have struggled with. Furthermore, you can upload your own impulse responses (IR) with the Strymon software. 

Ultimately, the Strymon Iridium Amp and IR Cab Simulator is a great all-rounder for guitarists, whether you’re looking to mobilize your live rig, to practice quietly at home, or expand your recording tools.

Universal Audio pedals

(Image credit: Future)
The best pedal amps for fans of classic amplifiers

Specifications

Type: Amp emulation pedals based on 3 vintage amps
Controls: Inst Vol, Mic Vol, Output, Room, Tone, Boost, Speaker switch, Store switch, Boost switch, Pair switch, Preset footswitch, Bypass footswitch
Connections: Standard inputs (1/Mono, 2/Stereo), standard outputs (1/Mono, 2/Stereo), USB
Output: N/A
Power: 9V DC adaptor (not supplied) 400 mA

Reasons to buy

+
Will appeal to ‘classic amp’ fans
+
Superb speaker options

Reasons to avoid

-
Only one amp emulation per pedal
-
Requires an app to switch presets

For some, the Universal Audio FX Amp Emulators might not be as flexible as some of their rivals, given their decision to strictly stick to one amp emulation per pedal, but for others – particularly those who suffer from option paralysis – having one really brilliant ‘amp in a box’ might just be the perfect solution.

The Woodrow ’55 is based on Fender tweed amps from the ’50s; the Dream ’65 Reverb Amplifier serves as the black-panel Fenders with an emulation of the Deluxe Reverb; and Ruby ’63 Top Boost Amplifier channels the legendary Vox AC30, with all three providing faithful reproductions of their classic counterparts, even down to their ability to take pedals in the front end.

Though a lack of MIDI integration feels somewhat of a shame, for technophobes the ability to take any one of the UAFX Amp Emulator pedals out of the box and achieve vintage tones, complete with tactile feel, without hassle will be hugely appealing. These are undoubtedly for the tube purists… despite there being no tubes in sight!

Read our full Universal Audio Amp Emulator Pedals review

Best pedal amps: Blackstar Dept. 10 Amped 1

(Image credit: Blackstar)
The best way to get gig volume in a tiny package?

Specifications

Type: Solid state 100-watt pedal amp
Controls: Preset and Reverb footswitches, Gain, Bass, Mid, Treble, Master Volume, Reverb level, power amp Response rotary selector, preamp Voice mini toggle, Cab Rig output line level control
Connections: MIDI in, Line in, line out / Loop, USB C, 8 and 16 ohm speaker outs, 2x 9V outputs (500mA total), XLR DI out, Cab Rig / headphone Line Out
Output: 100W
Power: 100V-240V mains

Reasons to buy

+
Packed with features
+
Loud 

Reasons to avoid

-
Requires app to change reverb

Blackstar have a really brilliant talent for coming into a saturated market and dropping something that not only sounds amazing, but also tends to undercut the competition for price, so it’s no surprise they’ve done it again with the 10 Amped 1.

The 10 Amped 1 is a genuine way of getting gig-level volume – courtesy of the 100 watt (at 8 or 16 Ohms), class D power section – in a unit that’s easily small enough to throw into your rucksack. With effects loop, built-in digital reverb and even MIDI integration, this has features that some premium amp heads/combos can’t match, plus it has its own dedicated DI output with 3 different speaker simulations to choose from, plus a headphone output. And for those who want to record at home, it can also act as an audio interface with USB connectivity.

Whilst it lacks the tube preamp section of Milkman’s The Amp or the BluGuitar Amp 1, the Amped 1 is an impressively versatile option that should be more than enough for most guitarists for just about any situation, and at a very competitive price.

Read our full Blackstar Dept. 10 Amped 1 review

Best pedal amps for guitar: BluGuitar Amp1 ME Mercury Edition 100W

(Image credit: BluGuitar)

4. BluGuitar AMP1 ME Mercury Edition 100W Pedal Amp

The best power amp pedal

Specifications

Type: Valve pedalboard amp with solid state power amp and valve pre amp
Controls: Clean Volume, Overdrive Gain, Overdrive Master, Bass, Middle, Treble, Reverb, Master, Boost, Modern Volume and Tone, Classic Volume and Tone, Clean Tone; Clean/Overdrive, Boost, Reverb, Parallel/ Serial, Noisegate
Connections: 1/4” input, 16 ohms & 8 ohms outputs, effect
Loops: series/parallel, switchable +4/-10dB, FX Send & Return (2 x 1/4” Jack), Rec/ Headphone Out (1/4” TRS Jack)
Output: 100W
Power: 100-240v

Reasons to buy

+
True tube sound
+
Highly flexible tone options 
+
Built in reverb 

Reasons to avoid

-
Increasing competition at this price

When it comes to getting realistic amp sounds from your pedalboard amp, it’s hard to look past the BluGuitar Amp1 Mercury Edition. While a number of its peers rely on digital modeling, the Amp1 is mostly analog, with a solid-state preamp driving nano designed ‘micro tubes’ into an impressive 100-watt class D amp output. So what you get is effectively a powerful four-channel tube amp packed into a stompbox.

While that’s a big win in itself, the BluGuitar Amp1 Mercury Edition is also highly responsive. Custom control can be used to enhance the best electric guitar pickups, even for single coil fans, some of whom have previously struggled to find suitable products in this market.

Featuring three drive channels and a versatile EQ setup, you can conjure up authentic tones from bluesy overdrive to full blown metal (especially when plugged into a 4x12 cabinet). And it’s in this area that the BluGuitar Amp1 Mercury Edition is truly hard to beat. Little else of this size packs such a punch, making it one of the best pedal amps out there.

Best pedal amps: Victory V1 Series Pedals

(Image credit: Future)
Premium Victory tone, in a seriously compact package

Specifications

Type: Solid-state, analog overdrive pedals
Controls: V1 The Copper: Volume, Gain, Bass, Tone and Treble; The Duchess, Jack, Kraken & Sheriff: Volume, Gain, Bass, Middle and Treble
Connections: Input & Output: ¼” mono jack socket
Power: standard 2.1mm centre pin negative DC socket
Output: N/A
Power: 9VDC from external PSU (not supplied), 15-17mA current draw depending on model. No battery option

Reasons to buy

+
Legendary Victory tone
+
British Built

Reasons to avoid

-
No DI output
-
No speaker emulation

With their V4 preamp and amplifier pedals, Victory really felt like it upped the game with pedal amps. Utilizing proper vacuum tubes, even valve-purists’ ears popped open, but as far as pedals go, they were on the large side. Working with stompbox genius Adrian Thorpe (of ThorpyFX) they’ve managed to tackle this ‘problem’ with conviction; delivering the V1 series.

The V1 series of pedals is a compact, single switch, ‘amp in a box’ range, with one amp model per pedal, based on each of Victory’s illustrious contingent. Built to the robust standard associated with ThorpyFX and with the slick design Victory have become known for, these are designed to make any clean amp sound like a proper all-valve Victory amp.

Whilst they do not have some of the features one might expect from a fully fledged pedal amp – namely a DI output, with speaker simulation – they each provide a powerful gain and EQ stage that should let players tweak their sounds to their heart’s content. Whether used as an ‘always on’ pedal at the end of your effects chain, or as a conventional stompbox, these pedals give you premium tube-style tone, in a tiny package.

Read our Victory V1 Series Pedals review

Best pedal amps: Walrus Audio Mako Series ACS1 Amp + Cab Simulator

(Image credit: Walrus Audio)
A stereo amp rig the size of a stomp box… yes please

Specifications

Type: Amp and cab simulator pedal
Controls: Bass, Mid, Treble, Volume, Gain, Room, Cab switch (A/B/C), L+R switch, Amp switch (Fullerton/London/Dartford), Boost footswitch, Bypass footswitch
Connections: Standard inputs (Left/Mono, Right), standard outputs (Left/Mono, Right), mini-jack headphone output, USB, MIDI in, MIDI out
Output: N/A
Power: 9V DC adaptor (not supplied) 300mA

Reasons to buy

+
Stereo output
+
MIDI compatible

Reasons to avoid

-
Not ideal for high-gain players
-
Small format with dual switches may be fiddly in live environment

With three choices of amp - a Fender Deluxe Reverb, a 1962 Marshall Bluesbreaker and a 1960s vintage Vox AC30 - the ACS1 ticks pretty much all the boxes for ‘classic amplifier tone’. With six integrated cabinet impulse responses, there are plenty of options already to tweak this to your own taste, and with the ability to load in your own impulse responses via USB, you can twin any one of those classic amps with your speaker of choice.

One of the absolutely standout features of the ACS1 is the stereo output, which enables you to have different amps and cabinets on each channel using the L + R switch. Having a ‘dual-amp setup’ would be the dream scenario for many players, but the reality of hauling around two amps - temperamental tube amps at that - just isn’t possible for most, so having that available to you in something that will slot seamlessly onto your pedalboard feels like a result! With MIDI integration, you can easily switch your stereo rig on the fly too.

Read our full Walrus Audio Mako Series ACS1 Amp review 

Best pedal amps for guitar: Seymour Duncan Powerstage 200

(Image credit: Seymour Duncan)

7. Seymour Duncan PowerStage 200

A powerful solid state with a lot of headroom

Specifications

Type: Pedalboard-mounted power amp with cab sim
Controls: Phones, Bass, Mid, Treble, Level, Presence, Cab Sim, EQ
Connections: ¼” input, ¼” output, ¼” phones output, 3.5 mm Aux input jack, balanced output (XLR), IEC socket
Output: 200W
Power: 100-240v

Reasons to buy

+
Huge headroom
+
An all-in-one type unit
+
Strong chassis 

Reasons to avoid

-
Better cab simulator options around 

Seymour Duncan has been making a name for itself in the pedal amp market with its PowerStage range for good reason – the company has created some of the most powerful yet simple to use products out there. The PowerStage 200 is a class D solid state amp that boasts an impressive 200-watt output. 

This is one of the reasons why many guitarists looking to downsize their rig look to the Seymour Duncan PowerStage 200, as there’s just so much headroom on offer here. While it works best when paired with a decent sized cab, the cab simulator option is pretty decent and means you can plug straight into the house PA and still get a great, full sound. 

Though comparable to the model below this, the PowerStage 170, the PowerStage 200 makes for the better pick as the cab sim and headphone output control make it a much more all-round option. 

Best pedal amps for guitar: Milkman The Amp 100W

(Image credit: Milkman Sound)

8. Milkman Sound The Amp 50W Tube Hybrid

The best power amp pedal for authentic built-in effects

Specifications

Type: Valve pedalboard amp with cab sim
Controls: Volume, Treble, Bass, Reverb, Depth, Rate, Master, Tremolo, Reverb
Connections: Speakon, ¼” jack, pedal out, XLR with cab sim, headphone out
Output: 25-100W (16 - 4 Ohms)
Power: 100-240v / 50-60hz

Reasons to buy

+
Respectable headroom
+
Warm tube sounds
+
Great built-in effects

Reasons to avoid

-
Solid state element may divide tube purists 

If our list of the best pedal amps was based on appearances alone, this would easily take the top spot. And while that is one of the best things about it, Milkman Sound’s The Amp has more to offer than just good looks. A class-D, solid-state power amp with a proper 12AX7 preamp tube, it offers between 25 and 100 watts of power.

As a result, it offers a respectable amount of headroom – though if you are looking for more, its bigger brother, The Amp 100, gives up to double the output power – as well as some great, warm tube tones, making it a good choice for players who have struggled to find that in purely digital options. Milkman Sound’s The Amp also runs on variable power, making it a much more user friendly option for those looking for a road-friendly power amp.

In terms of functionality, this pedal amp can be plugged straight into a passive cab as an amp head, as a tube preamp, as a practice amp through your headphones or as a DI amp for your DAW. In fact, this might be one of the best uses for The Amp, as it offers a lot more natural, nuanced tones than most plugin amp emulations. 

The icing on the cake is the excellent built-in tremolo and spring-style reverb effects that help give this already unique piece of equipment a bit more vibe and personality.

Best pedal amps: Orange The Guitar Butler

(Image credit: Orange)
The best preamp for pure analog dirt!

Specifications

Type: 2-channel preamp
Controls: Clean Channel: Gain, 3-band EQ; Dirty Channel: Gain, 3-band EQ, Volume 1, Volume 2, Presence
Connections: ¼” input jack socket, buffered FX loop. Amp out: ¼” output jack socket with no cab sim, XLR balanced out with cab sim
Power: 18V DC adaptor (supplied)

Reasons to buy

+
Low noise is ideal for recording
+
Dual channel for easy tone switching

Reasons to avoid

-
Only one cab sim

Orange aren’t newbies when it comes to putting amps on pedalboards – as you will see later in this list – however they have kept things relatively rudimental until now. Enter The Guitar Butler. Bass players may be familiar with the ‘Butler’ name, with the Bass Butler a serious contender in the bass preamp game and now Orange have made it their mission to offer the same level of pre-amp flexibility for guitarists. With two switchable channels – clean and overdrive – featuring the full range of authentic Orange tone, this is a comprehensive tonal workhorse that gives bags of options to suit almost any playing style.

This would be a great solution for those with a valve amp which errs more on the cleaner side, and opens up a totally new dimension of classic Orange dirt, courtesy of the JFET driven overdrive channel, providing valve-like feel and delicious harmonic distortion! The balanced DI output with cab simulation and buffered effects loop on the back makes it a dream for both live and home recording.

Read our full Orange The Guitar Butler review

Best pedal amps for guitar: Hughes & Kettner Black Spirit 200

(Image credit: Hughes & Kettner)
A versatile pedal amp for guitar that could replace your pedalboard

Specifications

Type: Analogue solid-state preamp with programmable digital controls and effects, Class D power amp
Controls: Channel select, gain, volume, bass, mid and treble. Noise gate, sagging, resonance, presence, master volume, pre loop select x2, boost select, fx access, loop select, store preset, monitor in level, cab type select, output power select, Red Box on/off, line/mic select, foot controller mode select, MIDI in, out/thru
Connections: Standard input, standard outputs (L, R), EXP/MIDI, USB, stereo mini-jack headphone output
Output: 200W
Power: 100-240v

Reasons to buy

+
Versatile tone options
+
Onboard effects and cab simulation
+
Can replace your amp and pedalboard 

Reasons to avoid

-
One of the more expensive units around 

The Hughes & Kettner's Black Spirit 200 Floor sets out to create a transportable version of the acclaimed Black Spirit 200 Head and Combo, and it does this relatively well while also offering a host of benefits unique to this unit. Featuring a digitally controlled analogue solid state preamp, the Black Spirit 200 Floor offers four channels: Clean, Crunch, Lead and Ultra. It’s also packed with high-quality digital effects, meaning this unit doubles as a multi-channel amp and cab simulator, as well as a multi-effects pedal.

The list of controls and features is too long to dissect for this best pedal amps guide, but the Red Box cabinet simulation is one of the clear standouts and makes it a perfect choice for recording direct or going straight to a PA. Another great feature is sagging control, which enables the Black Spirit 200 Floor to mimic valve amplifier dynamics. It’s those sorts of details that put this unit in the top tier of power pedal amps. 

While it is on the larger size in terms of dimensions, and not exactly ’board friendly, the Black Spirit 200 Floor is incredibly lightweight all things considered (8.9lbs/4.1kg) and could effectively replace a lot of equipment in your existing rig. 

Best pedal amps for guitar: Orange Terror Stamp

(Image credit: Orange)
A micro version of an iconic amp by a top-rated brand

Specifications

Type: Tube Hybrid guitar pedal amplifier
Controls: Volume 1, Volume 2, Shape, Gain
Connections: ¼” guitar input, buffered effects loop, cab sim output, speaker output (8/16 ohms)
Output: 20W
Power: 15V DC

Reasons to buy

+
Simple to use
+
Authentic Orange sound
+
Great value for money 

Reasons to avoid

-
Look elsewhere for high-gain tones 

One of the newcomers to the scene (released in the latter part of 2020), the Orange Terror Stamp could be seen as both the most portable and affordable way to get that renowned Orange sound. Bearing in mind Orange seems to have made this a mission of sorts since releasing the hugely popular Micro and Tiny Terror ranges, it’s about time they made their mark on the best pedal amp market. 

Thankfully, the Terror Stamp delivers in style and is based on the Micro Dark, with a single shape knob responsible for your overall tone. While that may be limiting for a lot of guitarists who prefer to have more control over their bass and treble, those used to this simple setup will know the range of voices that can be found here. 

The real star of the Orange Terror Stamp, as you might expect, is the gain control, and users can expect this to cover pretty well the full spectrum. While it might not fulfil those with ultra high gain needs, it does take pedals well. 

There’s also a switchable master volume that can effectively work as a boost if you need to take it up another level, though we think this feature could have been spared in place of a more versatile EQ setup. Still, this is a hard pedal amp to beat in this price range. 

Read our full Orange Terror Stamp review 

Best pedal amps for guitar: NUX Solid Studio

(Image credit: NUX)

12. NUX Solid Studio IR & Power Amp Simulator

The best power amp pedal for home studio use

Specifications

Type: Pedalboard power amp, mic and cabinet sim
Controls: Cab, Mic, Master, Drive, Presence
Connections: ¼” input, ¼” stereo outputs, DI output (XLR), USB
Output: N/A
Power: 9V DC

Reasons to buy

+
Affordable
+
Great simulations
+
Plenty of tone sculpting potential 

Reasons to avoid

-
Simulator not a true power amp 

For something containing a wide range of classic amp/cabinet combos (eight cabinets, eight microphones and three power amp tube simulations), the NUX Solid Studio IR & Power Amp Simulator is actually simple to use. NUX has really tried to cram as much into this box as possible, leading it to look complex and sophisticated. That said, you should find it fairly straightforward once you get your head around the layout. 

Featuring simulations of all the big name cabs, including AC30, Twin and Deluxe Reverbs, and Bassman, and so on, as well as all the key mics and placement options, there is so much scope for tone sculpting here. The NUX Solid Studio IR & Power Amp Simulator also features USB inputs to enable users to import their own impulse log in case any of the other options weren’t enough. 

As far as amp simulators go, it’s certainly realistic enough to gig with. But given the amount of cab and mic sim options here, it’s no wonder the IR & Power Amp Simulator found its best use as a studio tool, helping guitarists record realistic mic’d up cabinet sounds without needing a seasoned engineer on call. 

Best pedal amps for guitar: Tech 21 SansAmp GT2

(Image credit: Tech 21)

13. Tech 21 SansAmp GT2 Amp Emulator Pedal

One of the original and all-time best pedal amps

Specifications

Type: Analog Tube Amp Modeler
Controls: Level, High, Low, Drive
Connections: 1/4" input, 1/4" output
Output: 15W
Power: 9V DC

Reasons to buy

+
Well priced
+
Compact and easy to use 

Reasons to avoid

-
Dated in terms of tech 

One of the legends and without question one of the all-time greats in the pedal amp market, the Tech 21 SansAmp GT2 Amp Emulator Pedal’s popularity is well-deserved. Not only is this an affordable and easy fit for your pedalboard, it offers a heap of tone options for its size.

With three different tube amp sounds (modelled on Fender, Marshall and Mesa Boogie), multiple mic placements, and a plethora of gain settings, you can cover a range of styles and sounds with just this box. While many players talk the GT2 down to a glorified distortion, it’s still an effective amp modeler and does an admirable job of getting aforementioned amp sounds down.

The Tech 21 SansAmp GT2 Amp Emulator Pedal is, however, the oldest product on this list and the tech used is a bit dated. That’s especially true when you look at something like the Strymon Iridium, which makes the somewhat limited functionality of the SansAmp feel ancient. Regardless of that, the GT-2 is a great option for those looking for a simple pedal amp that packs a punch.

Best pedal amps: Buying advice

Best pedal amps: Orange Terror Stamp

(Image credit: Future / Olly Curtis)

What is a pedal amp?

The name ‘pedal amplifier’ can mean many things. From a guitar pedal that sounds like an amp; models the speaker output of an amp; or is essentially an amplifier head, in a pedal format. Every one of these has their place, but also have very specific jobs.

What to consider when choosing a pedal amp

When choosing a pedal amp, it’s important to know what you’re looking for. Do you need something to create volume, tone, or both? That will decide whether you need a pedal that acts as a preamp or power amp. A preamp is the tonal shaping stage of any amplifier, where many of the sonic characteristics are added and tweaked, and you will often find a gain and sculpture (EQ) stage. 

The volume of an amp is determined by the power amp, which is required to bring the preamp to life, and vice versa. The benefit of a power amp in a pedal, is that you (often) reduce the size of your rig immensely, making it super easy and lightweight to transport.

If volume isn’t on your agenda many of the best preamp pedals have dedicated line-outs on the back with speaker emulation, allowing the user to plug straight into their recording system or a PA system and get an authentic, amplifier sound, without the need for their own power amp.

Find out more about how we make our recommendations and how we test each of the products in our buyer's guides.

How we choose products

You can trust Guitar World Our expert reviewers spend hours testing and comparing guitar products so you can choose the best for you. Find out more about how we test.

Here at Guitar World, we are experts in our field, with many years of playing and product testing between us. We live and breathe everything guitar and bass related, and we draw on this knowledge and experience of using products in live, recording and rehearsal scenarios when selecting the products for our guides.

When choosing what we believe to be the best pedal amps available right now, we combine our hands-on experience, user reviews and testimonies and engage in lengthy discussions with our editorial colleagues to reach a consensus about the top products in any given category.

First and foremost, we are guitarists, and we want other players to find the right product for them. So we take into careful consideration everything from budget to feature set, ease of use and durability to come up with a list of what we can safely say are the best pedal amp on the market right now.

First and foremost, we are guitarists, and we want other players to find the right product for them. So we take into careful consideration everything from budget to feature set, ease of use and durability to come up with a list of what we can safely say are the best pedal amps on the market right now.

Read more about our rating system, how we choose the gear we feature, and exactly how we test each product.  

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