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Professor Shred: Big Jumps — Using String Skipping to Create Multi-Octave Tapped Arpeggios

For these licks, I employ fretboard tapping in conjunction with string skipping to achieve a very smooth and even sound throughout. I know many guitarists prefer to use sweep picking when playing arpeggios, but to me, the sound of dragging the pick up and down across the strings is a little too abrasive and percussive.

This month I’d like to talk about the technique I use to perform the fast arpeggiated phrases on the song “A Wonderful Slippery Thing,” from my Erotic Cakes album.

For these licks, I employ fretboard tapping in conjunction with string skipping to achieve a very smooth and even sound throughout.

I know many guitarists prefer to use sweep picking when playing arpeggios, but to me, the sound of dragging the pick up and down across the strings is a little too abrasive and percussive.

Bent Out of Shape: A Beginner's Guide to Quintuplets

Recently, I've been experimenting with five-note patterns, or quintuplets. A quintuplet is when you fit five notes where usually you'd fit four. For example, you can fit 20 16th-note quintuplets in a normal bar where you'd play five evenly spaced notes for each beat. These rhythms can be challenging, so I wanted to give you some simple exercises and licks that will help you develop a "feel" for them.

Recently, I've been experimenting with five-note patterns, or quintuplets.

A quintuplet is when you fit five notes where you'd usually fit four. For example, you can fit 20 16th-note quintuplets in a normal bar where you'd play five evenly spaced notes for each beat.

These rhythms can be challenging, so I wanted to give you some exercises and licks that will help you develop a "feel" for them.

Professor Shred: 12-Step Program — Using Chromatic Passing Tones to Add Color to Your Soloing Ideas

I am often asked how I incorporate chromatic notes into my solos and how I approach playing “outside” the given key center of a
song. If you have ever used the blues scale, then you have already employed chromatic notes in some of the most musical ways possible.

I am often asked how I incorporate chromatic notes into my solos and how I approach playing “outside” the given key center of a song.

If you have ever used the blues scale, then you have already employed chromatic notes in some of the most musical ways possible.

FIGURE 1 shows the A minor pentatonic scale. To get the A blues scale, we simply add Eb, the flatted fifth (f5), as shown in FIGURE 2.

LessonFace with Steve Stine: Achieving Absolute Fretboard Mastery, Part 3

Today we’re going to pick things up where we left off by tackling the notes on the fourth string. And remember, we’re going to be focusing on the prime pitches — that is A, B, C, D, E, F, G — like we did with the fifth and sixth strings. I do this because I’ve learned that simplifying the notes across the fretboard can make things easier for students to master them.

Steve Stine, highly sought-after guitar educator, teaches live group and private classes at LessonFace.com.

In the last installment of my "Absolute Fretboard Mastery" series, we touched on mastering your open chords, your barre chords and the notes along your fifth string.

It’s been about a month since then, so I hope you’ve practiced hard and that you’re ready for this month’s installment.

Metal For Life with Metal Mike: Variations on Metal-Style Power Chord Formations

These videos are bonus content related to the April 2014 issue of Guitar World. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at our online store.

These videos are bonus content related to the April 2014 issue of Guitar World. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at our online store.
A time-honored element found in some of the heaviest of metal guitar riffs is the use of two-note power-chord forms played against open-string pedal tones.

Using Natural Harmonics to Surprise Listeners

I often think of a “tough love” quote from an old teacher of mine: “People at venues have their food to eat, drink to drink, friends to talk to and every other venue in town to go to. Can you keep their attention?” While that seems a tad harsh, it is good to some extent, as long as you use it to challenge yourself and surprise yourself with the music and guitar parts you come up with.

This week, we're going to take some normal chord progressions and turn them into quirky/surprising/pretty guitar parts.

I often think of a “tough love” quote from an old teacher of mine: “People at venues have their food to eat, drink to drink, friends to talk to and every other venue in town to go to. Can you keep their attention?”

While that seems a tad harsh, it is good to some extent, as long as you use it to challenge yourself and surprise yourself with the music and guitar parts you come up with.

What in the World: Fourth-Finger Warmups/Strengthening Exercises

The fourth finger is often neglected when it comes to playing guitar. Well, rock/blues guitar, at least. I notice players opt to do wide stretches between their second and third fingers rather than using the fourth. As a result, the fourth finger is very underused and gets weak. This generally begins when someone first starts playing guitar.

The fourth finger is often neglected when it comes to playing guitar. Well, rock/blues guitar, at least.

I notice players opt to do wide stretches between their second and third fingers rather than using the fourth.

As a result, the fourth finger is very underused and gets weak.

This generally begins when someone first starts playing guitar. They gravitate to the stronger fingers so they can begin playing right away, so they use their fourth finger very infrequently and develop a style that excludes it.

Adapting Keyboard-Style Arpeggios to Fretboard Tapping, Part 1

This month’s column focuses on an original composition of mine that acknowledges the influence of classical pianists on my playing style, specifically the way in which pianists will play arpeggios across several octaves very quickly (see FIGURE 1). In order to emulate that sound on the guitar, I’ve devised a few fretboard tapping techniques. In fact, much of my two-hand tapping technique is based on that goal and approach.

This lesson is taken from the July 2010 edition of Chris Broderick's Guitar World column, "Chaos Theory."

This month’s column focuses on an original composition of mine that acknowledges the influence of classical pianists on my playing style, specifically the way in which pianists will play arpeggios across several octaves very quickly (see FIGURE 1).

In order to emulate that sound on the guitar, I’ve devised a few fretboard tapping techniques. In fact, much of my two-hand tapping technique is based on that goal and approach.

Guitar Strength: The Other “Hendrix Chord”

Of the myriad contributions Jimi Hendrix has made to the lexicon of modern guitar, one of the most enduring is the legendary “Hendrix chord." The chord, an E7#9, was definitely nothing new when Hendrix famously used it in “Purple Haze” (Jazz and R&B guitarists used it extensively, and the Beatles featured it years earlier on “Taxman”), but its use by Jimi inspired its use by generations of guitarists in a wide range of styles.

Of the myriad contributions Jimi Hendrix has made to the lexicon of modern guitar, one of the most enduring is the legendary “Hendrix chord."

The chord, an E7#9, was definitely nothing new when Hendrix famously used it in “Purple Haze” (Jazz and R&B guitarists used it extensively, and the Beatles featured it years earlier on “Taxman”), but its use by Hendrix inspired its use by generations of guitarists in a wide range of styles.

Exclusive Video Lesson: "Bohemian Rhapsody" Tutorial by Daryl Kellie

This video is bonus content related to the April 2014 issue of Guitar World. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at our online store.

This video is bonus content related to the April 2014 issue of Guitar World. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at our online store.