Skip navigation
Help

Lessons

Betcha Can't Play This: Ethan Brosh's Minor and Major Add-ons

This lick is in the key of C# minor and starts off with a C#m(add9) arpeggio [C# D# E G#]. The arpeggio in the first beat is actually just a straight C#m triad [C# E G#] played across all six strings in two octaves, although landing on the high D# note [first string, 11th fret] provides the ninth degree.

This lick is in the key of C# minor and starts off with a C#m(add9) arpeggio [C# D# E G#].

The arpeggio in the first beat is actually just a straight C#m triad [C# E G#] played across all six strings in two octaves, although landing on the high D# note [first string, 11th fret] provides the ninth degree.

Bent Out of Shape: Guitar Workout 2014 — Symmetrical Scales

Last year, I gave you a 30-minute guitar workout designed for guitarists with limited practice time. The goal of the workout was to give you an intense 30 minutes of practice. The positive response to this workout inspired me make a new version for 2014. As with my previous workout the goal is the same: 30 minutes of intense practice.

Last year, I gave you a 30-minute guitar workout designed for guitarists with limited practice time.

The goal of the workout was to give you an intense 30 minutes of practice. The positive response to this workout inspired me make a new version for 2014. As with my previous workout the goal is the same: 30 minutes of intense practice.

Chaos Theory with Chris Broderick: Getting a Handle on Essential Pick-Hand Techniques

The exercises in this month’s column emphasize pick-hand techniques that are intrinsic to my style: sweep picking, alternate picking and multiple-finger fretboard tapping. Specifically, I wanted to create a convergence of these different playing techniques within a musical-sounding piece.

Hello and welcome to my new Guitar World instructional column, Chaos Theory.

Over the next several months I’m going to show you a variety of the techniques that I consider essential to my approach to the
electric guitar.

Metal For Life with Metal Mike: How to Fortify Power-Chord Ideas with Single-Note Lines and Diads

I call this month’s column “The Riff Welder” because in it I demonstrate a variety of ways you can bring more melodic content to your power-chord-driven ideas through the use of single-note lines and small two-note chord voicings, often referred to as “diads.” I will take a few fairly “stock” chord progressions and, by moving a few notes and voicings around, show you how to devise much more interesting and effective rhythm parts.

I call this month’s column “The Riff Welder” because in it I demonstrate a variety of ways you can bring more melodic content to your power-chord-driven ideas through the use of single-note lines and small two-note chord voicings, often referred to as “diads.”

I will take a few fairly “stock” chord progressions and, by moving a few notes and voicings around, show you how to devise much more interesting and effective rhythm parts.

A Clean Sweep: Mastering Sweep-Picked Arpeggios with Yngwie Malmsteen

When I was first getting into the guitar, I played it incessantly. I lived it, breathed it, ate it and slept it. I was also extremely self-critical, so from early on, I made sure to develop good playing habits—I constantly strove to sound in tune and have a great tone, and to play cleanly and in time. But I was also very hard on myself. If I played something incorrectly, I whipped myself mercilessly. Whenever I made a mistake, I made sure that I would never allow myself to repeat it.

The following is a classic Guitar World column by Yngwie Malmsteen.

When I was first getting into the guitar, I played it incessantly. I lived it, breathed it, ate it and slept it. I was also extremely self-critical, so from early on, I made sure to develop good playing habits — I constantly strove to sound in tune and have a great tone, and to play cleanly and in time.

But I was also very hard on myself. If I played something incorrectly, I whipped myself mercilessly. Whenever I made a mistake, I made sure that I would never allow myself to repeat it.

Full Shred with Marty Friedman: Taking Licks You’ve Learned from Others and Making Them Your Own

Hello, and welcome to my new GW instructional column. It’s good to be back! I hope the ideas and concepts I present here in the coming months will give you inspiration and insight into your own path to musical creativity. The most important thing I can say is that you should always strive to make your own distinct musical statement with what you play on the guitar.

Hello, and welcome to my new GW instructional column. It’s good to be back! I hope the ideas and concepts I present here in the coming months will give you inspiration and insight into your own path to musical creativity.

The most important thing I can say is that you should always strive to make your own distinct musical statement with what you play on the guitar.

Once you’ve learned from the examples I present in this column, I would like you to completely disregard the examples themselves and retain only the techniques contained within them.

Man of Steel with Steel Panther's Satchel: The Benefits of Simplicity, and How to Play “Community Property”

For this month’s column, we’re going to focus on a Steel Panther song that is so great and so hooky, it’s pretty much impossible to imagine that it even exists. “Community Property,” from our 2009 album, Feel the Steel, contains a grand total of four chords, which, to me, is a good thing. Simplicity can be great.

For this month’s column, we’re going to focus on a Steel Panther song that is so great and so hooky, it’s pretty much impossible to imagine that it even exists. “Community Property,” from our 2009 album, Feel the Steel, contains a grand total of four chords, which, to me, is a good thing. Simplicity can be great.

For example, I want all of my girlfriends to only have one vagina. That’s enough for me.

LessonFace with Steve Stine: Absolute Fretboard Mastery, Part 6: Chord Progressions — Video

Today we’re going to simplify and understand an extremely important part of music theory: chord progressions. Like all the knowledge areas we’ve covered so far in this series, I’m going to explain this in the simplest of terms so you can achieve a thorough understanding and absolute mastery of this concept.

Steve Stine, highly sought-after guitar educator, teaches live online group and private classes at Lessonface.com. His live online advanced guitar course, "Soloing Mastery," starts Saturday, June 21. It's a great Father’s Day gift! For more info, head here.

Hey, guys! Welcome back to the sixth installment of my current series, Absolute Fretboard Mastery!

Guitar Chalk Sessions: Methods for Targeting Problem Areas in Your Guitar Solos

I’ve noticed something about my soloing in the last couple of weeks. First, I’m not what you would consider a “lead guitarist.” I can hang, sure. But it’s not my area and I’ve never really been comfortable playing at higher speeds. That’s alright, because I make my musical living on the rhythm and layering side of the business. But I also noticed that I had some consistent problem areas as I moved across the fretboard.

I’ve noticed something about my soloing in the last couple of weeks.

First, I’m not what you would consider a “lead guitarist.” I can hang, sure. But it’s not my area and I’ve never really been comfortable playing at higher speeds.

That’s OK, because I make my musical living on the rhythm and layering side of the business. But I also noticed I had some consistent problem areas as I moved across the fretboard. I was messing up in the same spots over and over again.

What are “problem areas?”

United Stringdom with Jacky Vincent: More on Ascending and Descending Legato Runs and Developing "Fret-Hand" Traction

As I’ve mentioned in previous columns, when I’m soloing I like to combine a variety of flashy techniques—such as sweep picking, fretboard tapping and legato articulations—that allow me to play very fast lines. These techniques can be heard in my solos to the songs “Good Girls, Bad Guys” and “Don’t Mess with Ouija Boards” from the Falling in Reverse album The Drug in Me Is You. For this month’s lesson, I’d like to go over portions of those solos.

As I’ve mentioned in previous columns, when I’m soloing, I like to combine a variety of flashy techniques—such as sweep picking, fretboard tapping and legato articulations—that allow me to play very fast lines.

These techniques can be heard in my solos to the songs “Good Girls, Bad Guys” and “Don’t Mess with Ouija Boards” from the Falling in Reverse album The Drug in Me Is You. For this month’s lesson, I’d like to go over portions of those solos.